Beaglebone Black 1 Ghz computer with many interfaces for $45

BeagleBone Black is a ready-to-use 1-GHz computer that retails for $45.

BeagleBone Black was announced last week by BeagleBoard.org, a small group of engineers interested in creating powerful, open and embedded devices. The credit card sized computer runs on Linux and is designed to be an open hardware and software development platform that makes it quick and easy to build systems.

BeagleBone Black includes all the necessary components to connect a display, keyboard and network. It’s based on production-ready hardware and software. All of the components—including TI’s 1-GHz Sitara AM335x processor—are commercially available right now.

BeagleBone Black includes 2 GB of on-board storage to run pre-loaded Linux software. It also offers the Cloud9 integrated development environment to kickstart development and keep the microSD slot available for additional storage.

Raspberry Pi has a 700MHz processor and 512 MB of memory and costs $25 and $35

Here is a comparison of the older Beaglebone and Raspberry Pi

A comparison of Beaglebone Black and Raspberry Pi

Beaglebone black is a Linux computer with a powerful 1GHz ARM Cortex-A8 processor from Texas Instrument (SitaraTM AM335x), 512MB RAM, and 2GB of on-board storage.

Unlike the Raspberry Pi which relies on its SD Card slot to load software (including its operating system), Linux and Cloud9 IDE are preloaded onto this BeagleBoard so it frees up its microSD Card slot for whatever you need. It even offers an upgraded Web interface for Arduino-like controls. The mini-computer also supports other flavors of Linux like Ubuntu and Fedora, as well as Android for users who need a development device for the mobile platform.

Other connectors and ports that are baked onto the BeagleBone Black board include Ethernet, USB, micro-HDMI to plug into your HDTV, and two 46-pin headers that are compatible with over 30 plug-in boards called “capes.

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Beaglebone Black 1 Ghz computer with many interfaces for $45

BeagleBone Black is a ready-to-use 1-GHz computer that retails for $45.

BeagleBone Black was announced last week by BeagleBoard.org, a small group of engineers interested in creating powerful, open and embedded devices. The credit card sized computer runs on Linux and is designed to be an open hardware and software development platform that makes it quick and easy to build systems.

BeagleBone Black includes all the necessary components to connect a display, keyboard and network. It’s based on production-ready hardware and software. All of the components—including TI’s 1-GHz Sitara AM335x processor—are commercially available right now.

BeagleBone Black includes 2 GB of on-board storage to run pre-loaded Linux software. It also offers the Cloud9 integrated development environment to kickstart development and keep the microSD slot available for additional storage.

Raspberry Pi has a 700MHz processor and 512 MB of memory and costs $25 and $35

Here is a comparison of the older Beaglebone and Raspberry Pi

A comparison of Beaglebone Black and Raspberry Pi

Beaglebone black is a Linux computer with a powerful 1GHz ARM Cortex-A8 processor from Texas Instrument (SitaraTM AM335x), 512MB RAM, and 2GB of on-board storage.

Unlike the Raspberry Pi which relies on its SD Card slot to load software (including its operating system), Linux and Cloud9 IDE are preloaded onto this BeagleBoard so it frees up its microSD Card slot for whatever you need. It even offers an upgraded Web interface for Arduino-like controls. The mini-computer also supports other flavors of Linux like Ubuntu and Fedora, as well as Android for users who need a development device for the mobile platform.

Other connectors and ports that are baked onto the BeagleBone Black board include Ethernet, USB, micro-HDMI to plug into your HDTV, and two 46-pin headers that are compatible with over 30 plug-in boards called “capes.

video platformvideo managementvideo solutionsvideo player If you liked this article, please give it a quick review on ycombinator or StumbleUpon. Thanks

About The Author