DARPA project for device to clean blood to prevent Sepsis

Up to $22.83M in funds to be allocated for the Battelle, NxStage and Aethlon collaboration to develop an advanced portable medical device for DARPA—and ultimately civilian—use. The device will clean blood similar to how dialysis works but instead will prevent Sepsis.

DARPA created the Dialysis-Like Therapeutics (DLT) program to develop a portable device that creates a holistic treatment for sepsis. The device is intended to remove blood from the body, separate harmful “dirty” agents from the blood and return “cleaned” blood to the body in a manner similar to dialysis treatment for kidney failure.

This funding does not include human clinical trials that may be required prior to military use and/or United States Food and Drug Administration clearance for sepsis-treatment technologies.

The problem to be confronted is more severe than is commonly known—as many as 10 percent of combat wounds result in life threatening infections that ultimately lead to septicemia and/or sepsis.

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DARPA project for device to clean blood to prevent Sepsis

Up to $22.83M in funds to be allocated for the Battelle, NxStage and Aethlon collaboration to develop an advanced portable medical device for DARPA—and ultimately civilian—use. The device will clean blood similar to how dialysis works but instead will prevent Sepsis.

DARPA created the Dialysis-Like Therapeutics (DLT) program to develop a portable device that creates a holistic treatment for sepsis. The device is intended to remove blood from the body, separate harmful “dirty” agents from the blood and return “cleaned” blood to the body in a manner similar to dialysis treatment for kidney failure.

This funding does not include human clinical trials that may be required prior to military use and/or United States Food and Drug Administration clearance for sepsis-treatment technologies.

The problem to be confronted is more severe than is commonly known—as many as 10 percent of combat wounds result in life threatening infections that ultimately lead to septicemia and/or sepsis.

If you liked this article, please give it a quick review on ycombinator or StumbleUpon. Thanks

Subscribe on Google News