What if the economic shocks are over mostly for now ?

What if
Europe is bottoming ?
China is bottoming ?
US real estate continues its recovery ?
The US economy starts to pick-up momentum?
The Balance Sheet Recession is completely over ?
Abenomics works in Japan and Japan does not fall apart ?

UPDATE – July economic (trade, manufacturing) numbers give support to the bottoming out / activity picking up case for China, Europe and the USA.

Goldman’s Jan Hatzius has that forecast

Goldman’s Jan continues to forecast a pickup in real GDP growth to 3%+ in 2014.

Barring renewed adverse shocks, we expect this pickup to set the stage for a lengthy period of above-trend growth. This is partly because we lean towards the optimistic end of the spectrum with regard to the US economy’s supply-side potential. Admittedly, labor productivity growth has disappointed in recent years, with an average gain of just 1.4% (annualized) since the start of the recovery. But as Kris Dawsey noted in Friday’s US Economics Analyst, the reason seems to lie mostly in cyclical capital spending weakness. Total factor productivity—the component of GDP growth that cannot be explained by changes in capital or labor inputs—has remained quite healthy, averaging 1% over the past four years. As capital spending rebounds, labor productivity growth should rebound as well

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What if the economic shocks are over mostly for now ?

What if
Europe is bottoming ?
China is bottoming ?
US real estate continues its recovery ?
The US economy starts to pick-up momentum?
The Balance Sheet Recession is completely over ?
Abenomics works in Japan and Japan does not fall apart ?

UPDATE – July economic (trade, manufacturing) numbers give support to the bottoming out / activity picking up case for China, Europe and the USA.

Goldman’s Jan Hatzius has that forecast

Goldman’s Jan continues to forecast a pickup in real GDP growth to 3%+ in 2014.

Barring renewed adverse shocks, we expect this pickup to set the stage for a lengthy period of above-trend growth. This is partly because we lean towards the optimistic end of the spectrum with regard to the US economy’s supply-side potential. Admittedly, labor productivity growth has disappointed in recent years, with an average gain of just 1.4% (annualized) since the start of the recovery. But as Kris Dawsey noted in Friday’s US Economics Analyst, the reason seems to lie mostly in cyclical capital spending weakness. Total factor productivity—the component of GDP growth that cannot be explained by changes in capital or labor inputs—has remained quite healthy, averaging 1% over the past four years. As capital spending rebounds, labor productivity growth should rebound as well

If you liked this article, please give it a quick review on ycombinator or StumbleUpon. Thanks

logo

Don’t miss the latest future news

Subscribe and get a FREE Ebook