Can success against HIV/Aids be matched with cancer, heart disease, alzheimers and preventable poverty deaths

Huge gains in global public health are within reach over the next 10-20 years. The mean global life expectancy could move from 66 years to 75 years. The lowend 45-55 years should move to 65-75 years with progress against Aids/Hiv and extreme poverty. All developed countries should at least have life expectancy at 90 years or higher. Monaco has that level now.

The World Health Organization has written that Ending Preventable Child deaths is within reach.

The number of children dying each year under the age of 5 has fallen from 12 million to fewer than 7 million in the past two decades – a dramatic 42 per cent reduction.

But there is still a long way to go. A staggering 4.4 million children died in 2011 from conditions which are preventable or treatable: pneumonia, diarrhoea, malaria, birth complications and newborn infections.
Solutions are known and cost effective. The recent Lancet series on childhood pneumonia and diarrhoea shows that by 2025, key solutions for these top two killers of children under 5 could virtually eliminate child deaths from diarrhoea and reduce by almost two-thirds child deaths from pneumonia. These reductions would be possible if the solutions were scaled up to reach at least 80 per cent of the people who need
them.

Nextbigfuture believes All preventable poverty deaths could be virtually eliminated and deaths from cancer, heart disease, Alzheimers and traffic accidents could be reduced by an age adjusted 80% by 2030

Hundreds of thousands of deaths from Aids/HIV have already been avoided with industrial scale deployment drugs for millions of people.

Wider deployment across the developing world with effective treatment at less than $100 per person per year are implemented they would avert an estimated 13.5 million deaths and 19 million new HIV infections by 2025.

Can success against cancer, heart disease and Alzheimer’s be achieved on a similar scale and timeline and cost as the success against HIV/Aids ? Can gene therapy, vaccines, new diagnostics impact other major diseases in the same way as success against HIV/Aids ?

Extreme poverty (less than $1.25 per day per person GDP Purchasing power parity) could be virtually eliminated by 2025.

Clean water, smokefree cooking, clean sanitation and enough food could be provided which would greatly reduce 35 million avoidable deaths.

Air pollution deaths and disease can also be vastly reduced with affordable actions on pollution mitigation.

Advanced driver assistance systems will have widescale deployment. This will reduce the 1.2 million deaths from traffic accidents.

The technologies of cheap solar power, LED lights and cheap smartphones could be obtained by the poor by switching from kerosene at the same or lower cost.

By 2017-2020, $5-20 per person could provide lighting and electrical charging and basic electrical needs for every person in the world.

$30 billion to provide $20 of LED lighting and solar power to the 1.5 billion who would not have basic electrification through other means.

Fairly full featured smartphones cost under $100 in China now. By 2017, a $20 smartphone will be more capable that that $100 phone now.

$72 billion would be the cost of two years of kerosene spending to fill the basic electrification, lighting and communication gap.

So it would be affordable for the poor to make the switch to electrification themselves.

Modest electrification and smartphones could be used to provide people at $1.50 per person per day with what people now need $3-4 per person per day.

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Can success against HIV/Aids be matched with cancer, heart disease, alzheimers and preventable poverty deaths

Huge gains in global public health are within reach over the next 10-20 years. The mean global life expectancy could move from 66 years to 75 years. The lowend 45-55 years should move to 65-75 years with progress against Aids/Hiv and extreme poverty. All developed countries should at least have life expectancy at 90 years or higher. Monaco has that level now.

The World Health Organization has written that Ending Preventable Child deaths is within reach.

The number of children dying each year under the age of 5 has fallen from 12 million to fewer than 7 million in the past two decades – a dramatic 42 per cent reduction.

But there is still a long way to go. A staggering 4.4 million children died in 2011 from conditions which are preventable or treatable: pneumonia, diarrhoea, malaria, birth complications and newborn infections.
Solutions are known and cost effective. The recent Lancet series on childhood pneumonia and diarrhoea shows that by 2025, key solutions for these top two killers of children under 5 could virtually eliminate child deaths from diarrhoea and reduce by almost two-thirds child deaths from pneumonia. These reductions would be possible if the solutions were scaled up to reach at least 80 per cent of the people who need
them.

Nextbigfuture believes All preventable poverty deaths could be virtually eliminated and deaths from cancer, heart disease, Alzheimers and traffic accidents could be reduced by an age adjusted 80% by 2030

Hundreds of thousands of deaths from Aids/HIV have already been avoided with industrial scale deployment drugs for millions of people.

Wider deployment across the developing world with effective treatment at less than $100 per person per year are implemented they would avert an estimated 13.5 million deaths and 19 million new HIV infections by 2025.

Can success against cancer, heart disease and Alzheimer’s be achieved on a similar scale and timeline and cost as the success against HIV/Aids ? Can gene therapy, vaccines, new diagnostics impact other major diseases in the same way as success against HIV/Aids ?

Extreme poverty (less than $1.25 per day per person GDP Purchasing power parity) could be virtually eliminated by 2025.

Clean water, smokefree cooking, clean sanitation and enough food could be provided which would greatly reduce 35 million avoidable deaths.

Air pollution deaths and disease can also be vastly reduced with affordable actions on pollution mitigation.

Advanced driver assistance systems will have widescale deployment. This will reduce the 1.2 million deaths from traffic accidents.

The technologies of cheap solar power, LED lights and cheap smartphones could be obtained by the poor by switching from kerosene at the same or lower cost.

By 2017-2020, $5-20 per person could provide lighting and electrical charging and basic electrical needs for every person in the world.

$30 billion to provide $20 of LED lighting and solar power to the 1.5 billion who would not have basic electrification through other means.

Fairly full featured smartphones cost under $100 in China now. By 2017, a $20 smartphone will be more capable that that $100 phone now.

$72 billion would be the cost of two years of kerosene spending to fill the basic electrification, lighting and communication gap.

So it would be affordable for the poor to make the switch to electrification themselves.

Modest electrification and smartphones could be used to provide people at $1.50 per person per day with what people now need $3-4 per person per day.

If you liked this article, please give it a quick review on ycombinator or StumbleUpon. Thanks

Subscribe on Google News