Ford and Samsung on track for lithium ion batteries for 70% of the car line up and regenerative braking and mild hybriding for all

Ford and Samsung have a dual-battery system combines a lithium-ion battery with a 12-volt lead-acid battery that could enable regenerative braking technology in non-hybrid vehicles for greater fuel savings.

Dual-battery system research combines lithium-ion with lead-acid batteries enabling regenerative braking and greater fuel savings

Ford and Samsung SDI research new ultra-lightweight lithium-ion battery concept that could one day render traditional lead-acid batteries obsolete

Leveraging innovation in consumer electronics batteries may lead to reductions in size and weight of automotive batteries, as well as increased efficiencies and capability

Ford Motor Company and Samsung SDI, an affiliate of Samsung Group, today announced research on different levels of hybrid technology that could one day be produced in high volume on non-hybrid vehicles for greater fuel savings.

The result of a 10-year research effort, the dual-battery system combines a lithium-ion battery with a 12-volt lead-acid battery that could enable regenerative braking technology in non-hybrid vehicles for greater fuel savings.

“We are currently expanding our Auto Start-Stop technology across 70 percent of our lineup, and this dual-battery system has the potential to bring even more levels of hybridization to our vehicles for greater energy savings across the board,” said Ted Miller, senior manager, Energy Storage Strategy and Research, Ford Motor Company. “Although still in research, this type of battery could provide a near-term solution for greater reduction of carbon dioxide.”

Currently available on Ford’s hybrid vehicles, regenerative braking enables the battery to capture up to 95 percent of the electrical energy normally lost during the braking process for reuse. The system works in conjunction with Ford’s Auto Start-Stop, which seamlessly turns off the engine when a vehicle stops to save fuel. An advanced battery then powers vehicle accessories and systems in place of the engine until the driver begins to release the brake pedal, which restarts the engine.

Light-weighting battery technology

Ford and Samsung SDI also are researching a longer-term ultra-lightweight lithium-ion battery that could one day render traditional lead-acid batteries obsolete. The research advances lithium-ion battery technology currently available on Ford’s electrified vehicles.

Supplying all power to air conditioning and electronics with about 2-4 kWh

There is an analysis of the power used for air conditioning in a car. A car with 5-10% of the battery energy storage capability of a regular hybrid or electric car could have enough power to have all air conditioning and electronics in the car run on the batteries. If this was combined with a square meter of solar panels there would be advantages in terms of never running out of basic power supply whenever you are by any car.

Mild hybriding can save 10-27% of the fuel used in a car. It depends upon the type of car or truck.

An across the board boost of 10% in fuel efficiency in the United States (if it included cars that are on the road now) would mean 2 million barrels per day in fuel saving. It would take about 7 years to get to about half of all the miles driven with fleet replacement with all cars having more efficiency.

Lithium-ion batteries currently used in Ford’s electrified vehicles are 25 percent to 30 percent smaller than previous hybrid batteries made of nickel-metal-hydride, and offer approximately three times the power per cell.

The ultra-lightweight battery concept offers a weight reduction of up to 40 percent, or 12 pounds. Combining the battery with other weight reduction solutions, such as the Ford Lightweight Concept vehicle, could lead to additional savings in size and weight of the overall vehicle, as well as increased efficiencies and performance

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