Low Mass antimatter stars could exist in this galaxy and elsewhere

Arxiv – Antimatter and antistars in the universe and in the Galaxy (10 pages)

International researchers from Russia, Japan and Italy consider consequences of hypothetical existence of baryo-dense stars created in the very early universe within an extension of Affleck-Dine scenario of baryogenesis. New constraints on the
possible number of compact antimatter objects are derived. The contemporary observational data do not exclude significant amount of antimatter in the Galaxy (and in other galaxies) in the form of the baryo-dense low-massive star.

The contemporary observational data do not exclude significant amount of antimatter in the Galaxy (and in other galaxies), especially in the form of the baryo-dense low-massive stars created in the very early universe. The total mass of these antimatter objects could be comparable with the total mass of the Galaxy. They would populate the galactic halo and might make a noticeable contribution to dark matter and, in particular, to Machos observed through microlensing. The BD stars should have an unusual chemical content because they were formed in the regions with very high baryon-to-photon ratio, where BBN proceeded with more efficient synthesis of heavy elements. Thus a star with chemical anomaly may present a good possibility to be an antimatter star.

Most of the gas anti-matter from BD stellar winds is likely to survive until the present time. Even at the present time, in
dense intercluster gas with baryon number density such anti-particles moving with virial velocities of a few 1000 km/s can annihilate only very slowly.

The physics of BD-stars is quite poorly studied and may be very much different from the usual astrophysics because the initial states of such stars quite often were different from the initial states of the usual stars. For example, BD-stars could be formed in the state when the external pressure was larger than the internal one. Moreover they start from already dense and hot state but not frm cold disperse gas cloud. In particular, there could be BD-stars which are similar to the core of red giants but without external layers and some other strange objects.

As a by-product, the model considered here explains the formation of superheavy black holes and suggests an inverted process of the galaxy formation: first, a superheavy BH was born, which served as a seed for the subsequent collection of matter making galaxy.

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