Large Hadron Collider upgraded to 13 Trillion electron volts, could get 10 times more luminosity then a 100 TeV successor

In 2015, CERN has detailed planning for a large-scale upgrade to increase luminosity and thereby exploit the LHC to its full potential. The HL (High Luminosity) LHC is CERN’s number-one priority and will increase the number of collisions accumulated in the experiments by a factor of ten from 2024 onwards. The High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC; formerly SLHC, Super Large Hadron Collider) is a proposed upgrade to the Large Hadron Collider to be made after around ten years of operation. The upgrade aims at increasing the luminosity of the machine by a factor of 10, up to 10^35 cm−2s−1, providing a better chance to see rare processes and improving statistically marginal measurements.

In 2015, the LHC has been upgraded to operate with an energy of 13 TeV, almost double its previous maximum energy.

Even though the LHC programme is already well defined for the next two decades, the time has come to look even further ahead, so CERN is now initiating an exploratory study for a future long-term project centred on a new-generation circular collider with a circumference of 80 to 100 kilometres. A worthy successor to the LHC, whose collision energies will reach 14 TeV, such an accelerator would allow particle physicists to push back the boundaries of knowledge even further. The Future Circular Collider (FCC) programme will focus especially on studies for a hadron collider, similar to the LHC, capable of reaching unprecedented energies in the region of 100 TeV.

The goal of the two studies is to examine the feasibility of the various possible machines, to evaluate their costs and to produce a conceptual design report for the FCC and elaborate on the one already produced for CLIC in time for the next European Strategy update around 2018/2019

SOURCES – Cern, Wikipedia

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