Comcast will offer 2 Gigabit internet service to about 18 million subscribers by end of 2015

Comcast announced it will offer residential multi-gigabit broadband service to more than 1.5 million customers in Atlanta starting next month. Gigabit Pro is a symmetrical, 2 Gigabit-per-second (Gbps) service that will be delivered via a fiber-to-the-home solution. Service will be offered broadly across the Atlanta metro area and will be the fastest residential Internet speed in the country.

Combast plans to offer internet speeds of up to 2 gigabits per second to about 18 million subscribers (out of their current 22 million by the end of 2015.

Google Fiber service offers 1 gigabit per second (Gbps) of upstream and downstream bandwidth to customers living in Kansas City, Missouri; Provo, Utah; Austin, Texas; and soon other cities. Google Fiber customers pay about $70 per month for service that’s 30 times faster than the average US broadband connection.

Comcast hasn’t announced pricing yet, but chances are Gigabit Pro won’t be cheap. The company’s current 505 Mbps (roughly half a gigabit) connection costs just under $400 per month.

Comcast told Ars Technica writer Jon Brodkin that Gigabit Pro will cost less than the Comcast Gigabit Pro service.

Comcast already delivers up to 10Gbps fiber service to businesses, serving more than 1.5 million businesses nationwide. “Earlier this month, Comcast announced a technology partnership with the Atlanta Braves to deliver multi-gigabit speeds to residences and businesses throughout the team’s new mixed use and stadium development project,” Comcast said.

Comcast also plans to deliver gigabit download speeds to cable customers with new equipment supporting DOCSIS 3.1, a faster version of the Data Over Cable Service Interface Specification.

“We hope to begin rolling out DOCSIS 3.1 in early 2016, and when fully deployed, it will mean almost every customer in our footprint will be able to receive gigabit speeds over our existing network (a combination of both fiber and coax),” Comcast wrote.

SOURCES – Comcast, Wired, Christian Science Monitor, Ars Technica

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Comcast will offer 2 Gigabit internet service to about 18 million subscribers by end of 2015

Comcast announced it will offer residential multi-gigabit broadband service to more than 1.5 million customers in Atlanta starting next month. Gigabit Pro is a symmetrical, 2 Gigabit-per-second (Gbps) service that will be delivered via a fiber-to-the-home solution. Service will be offered broadly across the Atlanta metro area and will be the fastest residential Internet speed in the country.

Combast plans to offer internet speeds of up to 2 gigabits per second to about 18 million subscribers (out of their current 22 million by the end of 2015.

Google Fiber service offers 1 gigabit per second (Gbps) of upstream and downstream bandwidth to customers living in Kansas City, Missouri; Provo, Utah; Austin, Texas; and soon other cities. Google Fiber customers pay about $70 per month for service that’s 30 times faster than the average US broadband connection.

Comcast hasn’t announced pricing yet, but chances are Gigabit Pro won’t be cheap. The company’s current 505 Mbps (roughly half a gigabit) connection costs just under $400 per month.

Comcast told Ars Technica writer Jon Brodkin that Gigabit Pro will cost less than the Comcast Gigabit Pro service.

Comcast already delivers up to 10Gbps fiber service to businesses, serving more than 1.5 million businesses nationwide. “Earlier this month, Comcast announced a technology partnership with the Atlanta Braves to deliver multi-gigabit speeds to residences and businesses throughout the team’s new mixed use and stadium development project,” Comcast said.

Comcast also plans to deliver gigabit download speeds to cable customers with new equipment supporting DOCSIS 3.1, a faster version of the Data Over Cable Service Interface Specification.

“We hope to begin rolling out DOCSIS 3.1 in early 2016, and when fully deployed, it will mean almost every customer in our footprint will be able to receive gigabit speeds over our existing network (a combination of both fiber and coax),” Comcast wrote.

SOURCES – Comcast, Wired, Christian Science Monitor, Ars Technica

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