Kuangchi Science has 52% stake in Jetpack company and is making internet blimps to compete with Google Loon

Martin Aircraft, the jetpack company, raised $27 million by issuing shares in the company, most of which were taken up by China-based investor KuangChi Science.

The Shenzhen-based Kuang-Chi Institute of Advanced Technology has a 52 per cent stake in Martin Aircraft.

The funds raised by the listing will go toward a commercial jetpack planned for the second quarter of 2016.

The US Department of Homeland Security intends to take the product, which can fly for 30 minutes with a 30-kilometre range at speeds of up to 74 kilometres per hour.

Martin Aircraft (ASX: MJP) listed on the ASX less than two months ago. Within its first two weeks as a publicly listed company, the stock surged as much as 687.5% to $3.15, but has since come back down to earth to trade at 95 cents (A$233 million valuation).

Liu and his team at Kuang-Chi Science – a firm founded in 2010 – are also interested in developing cutting-edge aerospace technology and metamaterials (synthetic materials with properties not found in nature).

After Google released its Project Loon, releasing high-altitude balloons delivering internet signals in order to connect people in remote areas, Kuang-Chi Science released its own space balloon [NBF actually the picture looks like a metallic blimp]– the “Yun Duan”, which means Cloud – in December, pledging to provide internet access to millions of Chinese people.

The base for the space balloon is called “Apollo basement” and is located in the Shenzhen Longgang district. Kuang-Chi tested the balloon in February, claiming that the balloon could beam Wi-fi signals in a radius of 100 kilometres at an altitude of 4,000 metres.

Liu himself made a splash in local scientific circles after publishing an article, with other researchers, in the journal Science in 2009 on a proposed design for an “invisibility cloak”, composed of thousands of glass-like fibres which deflect light from its surface.

Awards and honours followed. At age 29, Liu was selected as a top-level “863 specialist” in metamaterials, a national honour and one rarely granted to someone so young. The “863” is a code name for a top-level government-sponsored research project.

Known as the Traveler, the giant helium filled balloon [or blimp] will be approximately 40 meter diameter, 1 tonne helium filled balloon, floats in what’s known as ‘near space’ which lies between 20 to 100km above sea level — twice the height flown by commercial airlines

Recently, KuangChi Science (HKSE: 00439) has successfully conducted a test launch and related commercial testing of the Cloud, one of its disruptive novel space technologies, in KuangChi Apollo Base located in Longgang District of Shenzhen. The tasks included testing of Wi-Fi communication coverage, ground monitoring and collection of maritime big-data of the Cloud. These three core functions showed their actual results as expected.

The Cloud is a cloud platform providing integrated services including communication, internet access, big-data collection and analysis. It is characterized by its heavy loading and extensive coverage, enabling it to provide brand-new big-data and information services. The Cloud is 48 metres long and 20 metres high and is equipped with helium buoyancy system. Moreover, the Cloud adopts new material technologies that connect optical fibers in the air with the main network on the ground, which creates an uplink and downlink megadata hierarchy. In the course of the commercial testing, the Cloud was repeatedly calibrated for its altitude within the planned range. The three core functions showed their actual results as expected. Specifically, the high speed Wi-Fi communication transmission reached high capacity at 108Mb/s. The Wi-Fi communication capacity for the area of 40 kilometers away from centre kept its measurement at 26Mb/s. The planned information coverage of 8,000 square kilometers (equivalent to more than double the aggregate area of Shenzhen and Hong Kong) was achieved. The ground surveillance equipment carried by the Cloud shot wide angle high-definition images with resolution of 1080p from sky above. The maritime surveillance equipment collected real-time maritime information within the peripheral area of more than 200 kilometers from Shenzhen regarding the name, nationality, longitude and latitude, navigation and speed of 2,103 vessels on water sailing from 28 countries and regions including China, Korea, Albania, Belarus, Malaysia, Denmark, America, Cyprus, Liberia, Marshall Islands and Kerguelan Islands. Compared to the traditional platform, the water area under the surveillance of the Cloud is enlarged by 9 times.

SOURCES – The Australian, Motley Fool, South China Morning Post, Youtube, Market Wired

Subscribe on Google News

Kuangchi Science has 52% stake in Jetpack company and is making internet blimps to compete with Google Loon

Martin Aircraft, the jetpack company, raised $27 million by issuing shares in the company, most of which were taken up by China-based investor KuangChi Science.

The Shenzhen-based Kuang-Chi Institute of Advanced Technology has a 52 per cent stake in Martin Aircraft.

The funds raised by the listing will go toward a commercial jetpack planned for the second quarter of 2016.

The US Department of Homeland Security intends to take the product, which can fly for 30 minutes with a 30-kilometre range at speeds of up to 74 kilometres per hour.

Martin Aircraft (ASX: MJP) listed on the ASX less than two months ago. Within its first two weeks as a publicly listed company, the stock surged as much as 687.5% to $3.15, but has since come back down to earth to trade at 95 cents (A$233 million valuation).

Liu and his team at Kuang-Chi Science – a firm founded in 2010 – are also interested in developing cutting-edge aerospace technology and metamaterials (synthetic materials with properties not found in nature).

After Google released its Project Loon, releasing high-altitude balloons delivering internet signals in order to connect people in remote areas, Kuang-Chi Science released its own space balloon [NBF actually the picture looks like a metallic blimp]– the “Yun Duan”, which means Cloud – in December, pledging to provide internet access to millions of Chinese people.

The base for the space balloon is called “Apollo basement” and is located in the Shenzhen Longgang district. Kuang-Chi tested the balloon in February, claiming that the balloon could beam Wi-fi signals in a radius of 100 kilometres at an altitude of 4,000 metres.

Liu himself made a splash in local scientific circles after publishing an article, with other researchers, in the journal Science in 2009 on a proposed design for an “invisibility cloak”, composed of thousands of glass-like fibres which deflect light from its surface.

Awards and honours followed. At age 29, Liu was selected as a top-level “863 specialist” in metamaterials, a national honour and one rarely granted to someone so young. The “863” is a code name for a top-level government-sponsored research project.

Known as the Traveler, the giant helium filled balloon [or blimp] will be approximately 40 meter diameter, 1 tonne helium filled balloon, floats in what’s known as ‘near space’ which lies between 20 to 100km above sea level — twice the height flown by commercial airlines

Recently, KuangChi Science (HKSE: 00439) has successfully conducted a test launch and related commercial testing of the Cloud, one of its disruptive novel space technologies, in KuangChi Apollo Base located in Longgang District of Shenzhen. The tasks included testing of Wi-Fi communication coverage, ground monitoring and collection of maritime big-data of the Cloud. These three core functions showed their actual results as expected.

The Cloud is a cloud platform providing integrated services including communication, internet access, big-data collection and analysis. It is characterized by its heavy loading and extensive coverage, enabling it to provide brand-new big-data and information services. The Cloud is 48 metres long and 20 metres high and is equipped with helium buoyancy system. Moreover, the Cloud adopts new material technologies that connect optical fibers in the air with the main network on the ground, which creates an uplink and downlink megadata hierarchy. In the course of the commercial testing, the Cloud was repeatedly calibrated for its altitude within the planned range. The three core functions showed their actual results as expected. Specifically, the high speed Wi-Fi communication transmission reached high capacity at 108Mb/s. The Wi-Fi communication capacity for the area of 40 kilometers away from centre kept its measurement at 26Mb/s. The planned information coverage of 8,000 square kilometers (equivalent to more than double the aggregate area of Shenzhen and Hong Kong) was achieved. The ground surveillance equipment carried by the Cloud shot wide angle high-definition images with resolution of 1080p from sky above. The maritime surveillance equipment collected real-time maritime information within the peripheral area of more than 200 kilometers from Shenzhen regarding the name, nationality, longitude and latitude, navigation and speed of 2,103 vessels on water sailing from 28 countries and regions including China, Korea, Albania, Belarus, Malaysia, Denmark, America, Cyprus, Liberia, Marshall Islands and Kerguelan Islands. Compared to the traditional platform, the water area under the surveillance of the Cloud is enlarged by 9 times.

SOURCES – The Australian, Motley Fool, South China Morning Post, Youtube, Market Wired

Subscribe on Google News