Graphene dialysis membrane is ten times faster at filtering and will become 100 times faster

MIT engineers have fabricated a functional dialysis membrane from a sheet of graphene — a single layer of carbon atoms, linked end to end in hexagonal configuration like that of chicken wire. The graphene membrane, about the size of a fingernail, is less than 1 nanometer thick. (The thinnest existing memranes are about 20 nanometers thick.) The team’s membrane is able to filter out nanometer-sized molecules from aqueous solutions up to 10 times faster than state-of-the-art membranes, with the graphene itself being up to 100 times faster.

“Only 10 percent of the membrane’s area is accessible, but even with that 10 percent, we’re able to do better than state-of-the-art,” Kidambi says.
To make the graphene membrane even better, the team plans to improve the polycarbonate support by etching more pores into the material to increase the membrane’s overall permeance. They are also working to further scale up the dimensions of the membrane, which currently measures 1 square centimeter. Further tuning the oxygen plasma process to create tailored pores will also improve a membrane’s performance — something that Kidambi points out would have vastly different consequences for graphene in electronics applications.


1) Graphene, grown on copper foil, is pressed against a supporting sheet of polycarbonate.
2) The polycarbonate acts to peel the graphene from the copper.
3) Using interfacial polymerization, researchers seal large tears and defects in graphene.
4) Next, they use oxygen plasma to etch pores of specific sizes in graphene. Courtesy of the researchers (edited by MIT News)

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