AI will add smartness for better products and an economic boom

Kevin Kelly sees AI being better on a subset of intelligence. Over the next 20 years we will make things smarter and smarter.

We will put different kinds and types of sensors and intelligence an embody them in cars, robots and other devices etc…
* Calculators better than humans of math
* GPS better at spatial analysis

We will invent new types of intelligence like quantum intelligence.

Kelly sees them as not having consciousness and not being broad AGI.

Kelly explores three trends in AI we need to understand in order to embrace it and steer its development.

We will put intelligence into the cloud and distribute intelligence like the electrical grid.

24 thoughts on “AI will add smartness for better products and an economic boom”

  1. one could make a strong argument that there will *never* be “general AI” until robots have the “full sensory array” of all senses that humans do (minus maybe some taste or smell elements – taste and smell would look differently in a robot anyway)… if robots are to have neural net kinds of brains patterned after human brains that can learn and store memories like humans, they *need to have* the full sensory experience as humans, maybe even enhanced sensory experience…

    Reply
  2. one could make a strong argument that there will *never* be general AI”” until robots have the “”””full sensory array”””” of all senses that humans do (minus maybe some taste or smell elements – taste and smell would look differently in a robot anyway)… if robots are to have neural net kinds of brains patterned after human brains that can learn and store memories like humans”” they *need to have* the full sensory experience as humans”” maybe even enhanced sensory experience…”””

    Reply
  3. This seems rather anthropocentric. There is nothing special about human senses that give rise to intelligence. There are other rather intelligent animals that do not have exactly identical sensory experiences to humans (octopus, crows, dolphins). It’s not clear that an AI would require any physical sensors to be intelligent.

    Reply
  4. This seems rather anthropocentric. There is nothing special about human senses that give rise to intelligence. There are other rather intelligent animals that do not have exactly identical sensory experiences to humans (octopus crows dolphins).It’s not clear that an AI would require any physical sensors to be intelligent.

    Reply
  5. General intelligence zero to do with any of that. General Artificial Intelligence is essentially the ability to solve an arbitrary problem without problem specific modifications or tuning by programmers.

    Reply
  6. You can call it an economic boom if you want to. In fact it’s probably going to be a redistribution of wealth brought about by a decrease in the value of human labor.

    Reply
  7. Do we really want a super intelligent robot octopus tentacle monster? Have you never read any hentai at ALL? And as for crows? Nevermore! No, let’s go for something as human-like as possible. There might be a small chance that we could deal with it.

    Reply
  8. General intelligence zero to do with any of that. General Artificial Intelligence is essentially the ability to solve an arbitrary problem without problem specific modifications or tuning by programmers.

    Reply
  9. You can call it an economic boom if you want to. In fact it’s probably going to be a redistribution of wealth brought about by a decrease in the value of human labor.

    Reply
  10. Do we really want a super intelligent robot octopus tentacle monster? Have you never read any hentai at ALL?And as for crows? Nevermore!No let’s go for something as human-like as possible. There might be a small chance that we could deal with it.

    Reply
  11. I think it’s unlikely AI would have any of what we call motivation. Seriously, an AI might not need to be programmed to perform a task, or even told what tasks it needs to do to help achieve a goal, but it would still guidance directing it to achieve a goal. Sure, we could put a random number generator on it so it could roll dice and generate a variety of random goals, and then randomly decide what it wants to do, but that would be crazy (and likely very dangerous). Or we could try to make all sorts of artificial gland-equivalents for it and such belike, but that seems a bit crazy, too. We will probably employ artilects of some sort to hunt down and stop such things, and even try to prevent crazy people from trying to do stuff like that in the first place. It’s often been said that domesticated animals provided the brawn (nowadays it’s machinery) provides the brawn, and we provide the brains. What we will will see is probably an extension of this where machines provide the brawn, AI provides the brains, and we provide the motivation. Don’t be glum; we still get to be in charge.

    Reply
  12. I think it’s unlikely AI would have any of what we call motivation. Seriously an AI might not need to be programmed to perform a task or even told what tasks it needs to do to help achieve a goal but it would still guidance directing it to achieve a goal. Sure we could put a random number generator on it so it could roll dice and generate a variety of random goals and then randomly decide what it wants to do but that would be crazy (and likely very dangerous). Or we could try to make all sorts of artificial gland-equivalents for it and such belike but that seems a bit crazy too. We will probably employ artilects of some sort to hunt down and stop such things and even try to prevent crazy people from trying to do stuff like that in the first place.It’s often been said that domesticated animals provided the brawn (nowadays it’s machinery) provides the brawn and we provide the brains. What we will will see is probably an extension of this where machines provide the brawn AI provides the brains and we provide the motivation. Don’t be glum; we still get to be in charge.

    Reply
  13. I think it’s unlikely AI would have any of what we call motivation. Seriously, an AI might not need to be programmed to perform a task, or even told what tasks it needs to do to help achieve a goal, but it would still guidance directing it to achieve a goal. Sure, we could put a random number generator on it so it could roll dice and generate a variety of random goals, and then randomly decide what it wants to do, but that would be crazy (and likely very dangerous). Or we could try to make all sorts of artificial gland-equivalents for it and such belike, but that seems a bit crazy, too. We will probably employ artilects of some sort to hunt down and stop such things, and even try to prevent crazy people from trying to do stuff like that in the first place.

    It’s often been said that domesticated animals provided the brawn (nowadays it’s machinery) provides the brawn, and we provide the brains. What we will will see is probably an extension of this where machines provide the brawn, AI provides the brains, and we provide the motivation. Don’t be glum; we still get to be in charge.

    Reply
  14. General intelligence zero to do with any of that. General Artificial Intelligence is essentially the ability to solve an arbitrary problem without problem specific modifications or tuning by programmers.

    Reply
  15. You can call it an economic boom if you want to. In fact it’s probably going to be a redistribution of wealth brought about by a decrease in the value of human labor.

    Reply
  16. Do we really want a super intelligent robot octopus tentacle monster? Have you never read any hentai at ALL?

    And as for crows? Nevermore!

    No, let’s go for something as human-like as possible. There might be a small chance that we could deal with it.

    Reply
  17. This seems rather anthropocentric. There is nothing special about human senses that give rise to intelligence. There are other rather intelligent animals that do not have exactly identical sensory experiences to humans (octopus, crows, dolphins).

    It’s not clear that an AI would require any physical sensors to be intelligent.

    Reply
  18. one could make a strong argument that there will *never* be “general AI” until robots have the “full sensory array” of all senses that humans do (minus maybe some taste or smell elements – taste and smell would look differently in a robot anyway)… if robots are to have neural net kinds of brains patterned after human brains that can learn and store memories like humans, they *need to have* the full sensory experience as humans, maybe even enhanced sensory experience…

    Reply

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