Drug boosts immune system in elderly people by 40% and it also has antiaging effect in fruit flies

Drugs were created to block a protein called the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and it boosted the immune system by about 40% in elderly people.

They safely reducing infections in elderly volunteers around 40% by enhancing the immune system.

In 2004, tests that blocked a similar enzyme in fruit flies gave them a longer lifespan.

Science – TORC1 inhibition enhances immune function and reduces infections in the elderly

Dialing down TORC1 dials up immunity

Aging may be regulated by a discrete set of intracellular proteins including the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase. mTOR functions within two multiprotein complexes called TORC1 and TORC2. Inhibition of TORC1 has extended life span in every species studied to date and ameliorated multiple aging-related pathologies including declining immune function. Mannick et al. now show that low-dose TORC1 inhibitor therapy in elderly humans decreased the incidence of all infections, improved influenza vaccination responses, and up-regulated antiviral immunity. Thus, targeting the TORC1 pathway that regulates aging may have clinical benefits for elderly humans including improvement in immune function and decreased infection rates.

Abstract – TORC1 inhibition enhances immune function and reduces infections in the elderly

Inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) protein kinase extends life span and ameliorates aging-related pathologies including declining immune function in model organisms. The objective of this phase 2a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial was to determine whether low-dose mTOR inhibitor therapy enhanced immune function and decreased infection rates in 264 elderly subjects given the study drugs for 6 weeks. A low-dose combination of a catalytic (BEZ235) plus an allosteric (RAD001) mTOR inhibitor that selectively inhibits target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) downstream of mTOR was safe and was associated with a significant (P = 0.001) decrease in the rate of infections reported by elderly subjects for a year after study drug initiation. In addition, we observed an up-regulation of antiviral gene expression and an improvement in the response to influenza vaccination in this treatment group. Thus, selective TORC1 inhibition has the potential to improve immune function and reduce infections in the elderly.

24 thoughts on “Drug boosts immune system in elderly people by 40% and it also has antiaging effect in fruit flies”

  1. I’ve been research rapamycin (the original mTOR1 inhibitor) for over a year now. Has huge benefits in small once or twice a month doses – More isn’t better though, too much, too often will inhibit mTOR2 which will stifle your immune system, in fact rapamycin was originally (and still is) used as an immune suppressant for organ transplants. Look up “rapamycin therapy” and check out the website that comes up – a lot of solid information. Rapamycin is also very cheap to use for longevity.

    Reply
  2. This drug has been around for a long time and is pretty well understood. More trials are needed, but I can see this becoming a mainstream drug and low daily dose or once a week type treatments for age related disease or just for age and well being.

    Reply
  3. Gee, this has been known since 2004 and still we don’t have longer living Fruit Flies! Uh…it would be nice if there were human trials by now too…

    Reply
  4. This drug has been around for a long time and is pretty well understood. More trials are needed but I can see this becoming a mainstream drug and low daily dose or once a week type treatments for age related disease or just for age and well being.

    Reply
  5. Gee this has been known since 2004 and still we don’t have longer living Fruit Flies!Uh…it would be nice if there were human trials by now too…

    Reply
  6. I’ve been research rapamycin (the original mTOR1 inhibitor) for over a year now. Has huge benefits in small once or twice a month doses – More isn’t better though too much too often will inhibit mTOR2 which will stifle your immune system in fact rapamycin was originally (and still is) used as an immune suppressant for organ transplants. Look up rapamycin therapy”” and check out the website that comes up – a lot of solid information. Rapamycin is also very cheap to use for longevity.”””

    Reply
  7. In other anti aging news today Antoxerene got $10 million in seed funding in order to target the removal of senescent cells:www.businesswire.com/news/home/20180712005565/en/Antoxerene-Closes-10-Million-Deal-Juvenescence-Develop

    Reply
  8. I’ve been research rapamycin (the original mTOR1 inhibitor) for over a year now. Has huge benefits in small once or twice a month doses – More isn’t better though, too much, too often will inhibit mTOR2 which will stifle your immune system, in fact rapamycin was originally (and still is) used as an immune suppressant for organ transplants. Look up “rapamycin therapy” and check out the website that comes up – a lot of solid information. Rapamycin is also very cheap to use for longevity.

    Reply
  9. This drug has been around for a long time and is pretty well understood. More trials are needed, but I can see this becoming a mainstream drug and low daily dose or once a week type treatments for age related disease or just for age and well being.

    Reply

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