Canada one of few developed countries with growing population

Canada has an estimated population of 37.1 million (July 1, 2018). This update is based on the 2016 census. This is a 520,000 increase from the prior year.

Canada has increased its immigration quotas. Canada increased immigration quotas to 310,000 in 2018, 330,000 in 2019 and 340,000 in 2020.

Canada will pass the population of Poland in 2020.
Canada population will be 40 million in 2023.

Canada population forecast
2023   40 million
2032   45 million
2040   50 million
2049   55 million
2056   60 million
2064   65 million

Canada will have the projected population of Spain in 2032 and Italy in 2050 and Germany in 2070.

Canada’s GDP was at C$2.22 trillion in mid-2018. This is US$1.72 trillion. By the end of 2018 it should be US$1.75 trillion.

99 thoughts on “Canada one of few developed countries with growing population”

  1. Yeah, but 3% of a bigger pie is also more money than 3% of a small pie. In my personal observation, you have to allow for real estate shops working in fixed areas. If suburb A is all nice leafy single family home suburbia, with growing prices but no new development. And they have a couple of real estate agents who benefit from increasing prices. And suburb B is sort of nearby, but not close enough to be covered by the same real estate shops. But it IS close enough that a prospective buyer (who works in nearby city C) would consider both suburbs when looking for a place to buy. Now a development that puts 3000 new dwellings in suburb B is not at ALL welcome by real estate agents, or inhabitants, in suburb A, because it is a drag on suburb A prices. It probably also means more crowded roads running from A and B into City C. On the other hand, it might mean a nice new shopping center and movie complex in suburb B, which can then be used by Suburb A which couldn’t support such a thing on its own.

    Reply
  2. Yeah but 3{22800fc54956079738b58e74e4dcd846757aa319aad70fcf90c97a58f3119a12} of a bigger pie is also more money than 3{22800fc54956079738b58e74e4dcd846757aa319aad70fcf90c97a58f3119a12} of a small pie.In my personal observation you have to allow for real estate shops working in fixed areas. If suburb A is all nice leafy single family home suburbia with growing prices but no new development. And they have a couple of real estate agents who benefit from increasing prices.And suburb B is sort of nearby but not close enough to be covered by the same real estate shops. But it IS close enough that a prospective buyer (who works in nearby city C) would consider both suburbs when looking for a place to buy. Now a development that puts 3000 new dwellings in suburb B is not at ALL welcome by real estate agents or inhabitants in suburb A because it is a drag on suburb A prices.It probably also means more crowded roads running from A and B into City C.On the other hand it might mean a nice new shopping center and movie complex in suburb B which can then be used by Suburb A which couldn’t support such a thing on its own.

    Reply
  3. There is very little that is accurate in your post. ” Wrong. “City planners actually like high density housing – more revenue per mile of road/sewer/school bus route,” Not in California. Why? Because the cities don’t get property taxes but get stuck with all the expenses. I remember several years ago a radio interview of the outgoing Mayor of Belmont, CA. He said it was crazy. And in fact, after a certain density of housing happens, it is a net loss for the city. So, they have zero incentive to approve housing projects above that density limit (I forgot what it was, specifically) and EVERY incentive to build huge shopping malls because they get to keep the bulk of sales tax revenue. This interview was before Amazon started to wipe the malls out, of course. Property tax revenues are split between Sacramento and the local school district. Cities might get some from additional ‘parcel taxes’ but not a lot and that is for the lot, not housing unit…so the financial bias against dense housing remains. San Francisco is a weird exception in local government. It is both a county as well as a city and run their schools directly, I believe. So they get that other property tax revenue half but I could be wrong. Other than that 6% commission, every thing else Mindbreaker wrote is accurate and you didn’t even address any of it other than say “there is very little that is accurate in your post”.

    Reply
  4. There is very little that is accurate in your post. “”Wrong. “”””City planners actually like high density housing – more revenue per mile of road/sewer/school bus route””””””””Not in California. Why? Because the cities don’t get property taxes but get stuck with all the expenses. I remember several years ago a radio interview of the outgoing Mayor of Belmont”” CA. He said it was crazy. And in fact after a certain density of housing happens it is a net loss for the city. So they have zero incentive to approve housing projects above that density limit (I forgot what it was specifically) and EVERY incentive to build huge shopping malls because they get to keep the bulk of sales tax revenue. This interview was before Amazon started to wipe the malls out of course.Property tax revenues are split between Sacramento and the local school district. Cities might get some from additional ‘parcel taxes’ but not a lot and that is for the lot not housing unit…so the financial bias against dense housing remains. San Francisco is a weird exception in local government. It is both a county as well as a city and run their schools directly I believe. So they get that other property tax revenue half but I could be wrong.Other than that 6{22800fc54956079738b58e74e4dcd846757aa319aad70fcf90c97a58f3119a12} commission”” every thing else Mindbreaker wrote is accurate and you didn’t even address any of it other than say “”””there is very little that is accurate in your post””””.”””

    Reply
  5. LOL, okay.” Just because what I said is not politically correct for you doesn’t mean it is not true. ” The Americans treated those new groups with suspicion and outright discrimination ” So what? Has no bearing on what I said: “They assimilated” And I thought it was obvious WHY they were able to do so: Because they were European. There is a big cultural difference between non-Europeans and Europeans than there are between European cultures (which was the case with Americans and Irish, Italians, et al). Again, thought that was obvious. “All groups assimilate over time.” No. They do not. Especially these days. And one group that hasn’t is African-Americans. Not fully and not in any healthy way. This stems from the conditions that brought them to America — against their will and what happened for generations after that. “U.S. our largest immigrant group, by far, are the Hispanics. I’ve met several Hispanics who can’t speak and certainly can’t read Spanish, and I’m not even tied in to that community. They’re following the same trend” Hispanics are a fellow European culture. Not European themselves and neither are we, but derived from European culture just like ours did. So thank you for proving my point even further. I am surprised but I have no issue with taking that extra assist!

    Reply
  6. LOL” okay.””Just because what I said is not politically correct for you doesn’t mean it is not true.”””” The Americans treated those new groups with suspicion and outright discrimination “”””So what? Has no bearing on what I said: “”””They assimilated””””And I thought it was obvious WHY they were able to do so: Because they were European.There is a big cultural difference between non-Europeans and Europeans than there are between European cultures (which was the case with Americans and Irish”” Italians et al).Again”” thought that was obvious. “”””All groups assimilate over time.””””No. They do not. Especially these days.And one group that hasn’t is African-Americans. Not fully and not in any healthy way. This stems from the conditions that brought them to America — against their will and what happened for generations after that.””””U.S. our largest immigrant group”” by far are the Hispanics. I’ve met several Hispanics who can’t speak and certainly can’t read Spanish”” and I’m not even tied in to that community. They’re following the same trend””””Hispanics are a fellow European culture. Not European themselves and neither are we”””” but derived from European culture just like ours did.So thank you for proving my point even further. I am surprised but I have no issue with taking that extra assist!”””

    Reply
  7. California has more people than Canada. I bet their food is going to get much better and their social systems will improve. Canada will have even a bigger boom when the northwest passage is regularly used for shipping. New cities and ports for transfer of goods not to mention all the mining that just became profitable due to global warming, go Canada.

    Reply
  8. California has more people than Canada. I bet their food is going to get much better and their social systems will improve. Canada will have even a bigger boom when the northwest passage is regularly used for shipping. New cities and ports for transfer of goods not to mention all the mining that just became profitable due to global warming, go Canada.

    Reply
  9. California has more people than Canada. I bet their food is going to get much better and their social systems will improve. Canada will have even a bigger boom when the northwest passage is regularly used for shipping. New cities and ports for transfer of goods not to mention all the mining that just became profitable due to global warming go Canada.

    Reply
  10. California has more people than Canada. I bet their food is going to get much better and their social systems will improve. Canada will have even a bigger boom when the northwest passage is regularly used for shipping. New cities and ports for transfer of goods not to mention all the mining that just became profitable due to global warming go Canada.

    Reply
  11. LOL, okay. 1) The Americans treated those new groups with suspicion and outright discrimination (“Irish need not apply” for job postings, etc). The religion difference (Catholic vs. Protestant) was seen as a big deal, for one. So even though they were fellow Europeans, that didn’t make them more welcome. Germans were not welcome during WWI and especially WWII. What most people don’t know is that it wasn’t just Japanese that were sent to internment camps during WWII – thousands of Germans and Italians (civilians, living in the U.S.) were also sent to those camps. Obviously they couldn’t send them all, but those suspected of foreign sympathies could be sent, without trial. 2) All groups assimilate over time. The sole exception in the U.S. is the Pennsylvania Dutch. The pattern is that the first generation to come here prefer their native language, but learn our language to some degree. Their children are fluent in both languages. Their grandchildren speak English, only knowing a few words from the home country (usually names of food and terms of affection) and often marry outside of their ethnic group. That happened with me, as 3 of my 4 grandparents could read German before speaking English and grew up in heavily German areas of the U.S, but I never even heard German spoken in our house. I’m married to an eastern European, and I see that happening today with her friends kids, etc. So I suspect you’re going to say it’s different this time, the numbers are too great. In the U.S. our largest immigrant group, by far, are the Hispanics. I’ve met several Hispanics who can’t speak and certainly can’t read Spanish, and I’m not even tied in to that community. They’re following the same trend. Our language is not at risk. Maybe you’ll go with the Islamic/Christian divide. In the case of Canada anyway, right now 67% identify as Christian, 24% non-religious, 3.2% Muslim. I did a little spreadsheet, using their immigration quotas of 330K/yr, assume immigration

    Reply
  12. LOL okay.1) The Americans treated those new groups with suspicion and outright discrimination (Irish need not apply”” for job postings”” etc). The religion difference (Catholic vs. Protestant) was seen as a big deal for one. So even though they were fellow Europeans that didn’t make them more welcome. Germans were not welcome during WWI and especially WWII. What most people don’t know is that it wasn’t just Japanese that were sent to internment camps during WWII – thousands of Germans and Italians (civilians living in the U.S.) were also sent to those camps. Obviously they couldn’t send them all but those suspected of foreign sympathies could be sent without trial.2) All groups assimilate over time. The sole exception in the U.S. is the Pennsylvania Dutch. The pattern is that the first generation to come here prefer their native language but learn our language to some degree. Their children are fluent in both languages. Their grandchildren speak English only knowing a few words from the home country (usually names of food and terms of affection) and often marry outside of their ethnic group. That happened with me as 3 of my 4 grandparents could read German before speaking English and grew up in heavily German areas of the U.S but I never even heard German spoken in our house. I’m married to an eastern European and I see that happening today with her friends kids etc.So I suspect you’re going to say it’s different this time the numbers are too great. In the U.S. our largest immigrant group by far are the Hispanics. I’ve met several Hispanics who can’t speak and certainly can’t read Spanish and I’m not even tied in to that community. They’re following the same trend. Our language is not at risk. Maybe you’ll go with the Islamic/Christian divide. In the case of Canada anyway right now 67{22800fc54956079738b58e74e4dcd846757aa319aad70fcf90c97a58f3119a12} identify as Christian 24{22800fc54956079738b58e74e4dcd846757aa319aad70fcf”

    Reply
  13. Because 1) They were fellow Europeans and 2) They assimilated. (go ahead and fall for the trap I just baited you with…go ahead…I eagerly await your reply!)

    Reply
  14. Because 1) They were fellow Europeans and 2) They assimilated.(go ahead and fall for the trap I just baited you with…go ahead…I eagerly await your reply!)

    Reply
  15. Yeah, but 3% of a bigger pie is also more money than 3% of a small pie.

    In my personal observation, you have to allow for real estate shops working in fixed areas.

    If suburb A is all nice leafy single family home suburbia, with growing prices but no new development. And they have a couple of real estate agents who benefit from increasing prices.

    And suburb B is sort of nearby, but not close enough to be covered by the same real estate shops. But it IS close enough that a prospective buyer (who works in nearby city C) would consider both suburbs when looking for a place to buy. Now a development that puts 3000 new dwellings in suburb B is not at ALL welcome by real estate agents, or inhabitants, in suburb A, because it is a drag on suburb A prices.

    It probably also means more crowded roads running from A and B into City C.

    On the other hand, it might mean a nice new shopping center and movie complex in suburb B, which can then be used by Suburb A which couldn’t support such a thing on its own.

    Reply
  16. “There is very little that is accurate in your post. ”

    Wrong.

    “City planners actually like high density housing – more revenue per mile of road/sewer/school bus route,”

    Not in California. Why? Because the cities don’t get property taxes but get stuck with all the expenses. I remember several years ago a radio interview of the outgoing Mayor of Belmont, CA.
    He said it was crazy. And in fact, after a certain density of housing happens, it is a net loss for the city. So, they have zero incentive to approve housing projects above that density limit (I forgot what it was, specifically) and EVERY incentive to build huge shopping malls because they get to keep the bulk of sales tax revenue. This interview was before Amazon started to wipe the malls out, of course.

    Property tax revenues are split between Sacramento and the local school district. Cities might get some from additional ‘parcel taxes’ but not a lot and that is for the lot, not housing unit…so the financial bias against dense housing remains. San Francisco is a weird exception in local government. It is both a county as well as a city and run their schools directly, I believe. So they get that other property tax revenue half but I could be wrong.

    Other than that 6% commission, every thing else Mindbreaker wrote is accurate and you didn’t even address any of it other than say “there is very little that is accurate in your post”.

    Reply
  17. “LOL, okay.”

    Just because what I said is not politically correct for you doesn’t mean it is not true.

    ” The Americans treated those new groups with suspicion and outright discrimination ”

    So what? Has no bearing on what I said: “They assimilated”

    And I thought it was obvious WHY they were able to do so: Because they were European.

    There is a big cultural difference between non-Europeans and Europeans than there are between European cultures (which was the case with Americans and Irish, Italians, et al).

    Again, thought that was obvious.

    “All groups assimilate over time.”

    No. They do not. Especially these days.

    And one group that hasn’t is African-Americans. Not fully and not in any healthy way. This stems from the conditions that brought them to America — against their will and what happened for generations after that.

    “U.S. our largest immigrant group, by far, are the Hispanics. I’ve met several Hispanics who can’t speak and certainly can’t read Spanish, and I’m not even tied in to that community. They’re following the same trend”

    Hispanics are a fellow European culture. Not European themselves and neither are we, but derived from European culture just like ours did.

    So thank you for proving my point even further. I am surprised but I have no issue with taking that extra assist!

    Reply
  18. California has more people than Canada. I bet their food is going to get much better and their social systems will improve. Canada will have even a bigger boom when the northwest passage is regularly used for shipping. New cities and ports for transfer of goods not to mention all the mining that just became profitable due to global warming, go Canada.

    Reply
  19. California has more people than Canada. I bet their food is going to get much better and their social systems will improve. Canada will have even a bigger boom when the northwest passage is regularly used for shipping. New cities and ports for transfer of goods not to mention all the mining that just became profitable due to global warming, go Canada.

    Reply
  20. LOL, okay.

    1) The Americans treated those new groups with suspicion and outright discrimination (“Irish need not apply” for job postings, etc). The religion difference (Catholic vs. Protestant) was seen as a big deal, for one. So even though they were fellow Europeans, that didn’t make them more welcome. Germans were not welcome during WWI and especially WWII. What most people don’t know is that it wasn’t just Japanese that were sent to internment camps during WWII – thousands of Germans and Italians (civilians, living in the U.S.) were also sent to those camps. Obviously they couldn’t send them all, but those suspected of foreign sympathies could be sent, without trial.

    2) All groups assimilate over time. The sole exception in the U.S. is the Pennsylvania Dutch. The pattern is that the first generation to come here prefer their native language, but learn our language to some degree. Their children are fluent in both languages. Their grandchildren speak English, only knowing a few words from the home country (usually names of food and terms of affection) and often marry outside of their ethnic group. That happened with me, as 3 of my 4 grandparents could read German before speaking English and grew up in heavily German areas of the U.S, but I never even heard German spoken in our house. I’m married to an eastern European, and I see that happening today with her friends kids, etc.

    So I suspect you’re going to say it’s different this time, the numbers are too great. In the U.S. our largest immigrant group, by far, are the Hispanics. I’ve met several Hispanics who can’t speak and certainly can’t read Spanish, and I’m not even tied in to that community. They’re following the same trend. Our language is not at risk.

    Maybe you’ll go with the Islamic/Christian divide. In the case of Canada anyway, right now 67% identify as Christian, 24% non-religious, 3.2% Muslim. I did a little spreadsheet, using their immigration quotas of 330K/yr, assume immigration is 50% Muslim (probably high), and assume 50% more kids in Muslim families. It will take 10 years before the country is 7% Muslim, and 20 years to get to 10% Muslim. You know immigration trends or quotas will change long before then.

    Reply
  21. Kind of like how the U.S. was changed forever when the dirt poor Catholic Irish immigrated en masse. Then the dirty Germans and Italians, etc. At one time Milwaukee was over 1/3 German-born immigrants. Then all the Scandinavians invaded Minnesota and the Dakotas (even see “Fargo”? That’s messed up). Why didn’t we stop that from happening?

    Reply
  22. Kind of like how the U.S. was changed forever when the dirt poor Catholic Irish immigrated en masse. Then the dirty Germans and Italians etc. At one time Milwaukee was over 1/3 German-born immigrants. Then all the Scandinavians invaded Minnesota and the Dakotas (even see Fargo””? That’s messed up). Why didn’t we stop that from happening?”””

    Reply
  23. There is very little that is accurate in your post. Par. 1: People build equity in their houses until they retire, then they downsize. Any value gained during their working years then goes into their retirement funds, so it’s not an illusion. Par. 2: That’s your perception, but everybody recognizes that new building will always happen. Par. 3: Realtors might like more expensive houses, but they don’t get 6% anymore (unless you got duped), and volume with more housing would make up for it anyway. I really don’t think realtor’s PAC is a major player in any election, compared to all the other big money out there. Par. 4: City planners actually like high density housing – more revenue per mile of road/sewer/school bus route, etc. But the residents of the city usually put up a tough fight against high density housing because they think it will bring in lower-income residents and drive down their property values. Teacher’s unions don’t like high house prices, because that forces many teachers out of the district they teach in. They simply can’t afford a decent neighborhood close in town, unless they’re married to a lawyer or doctor or something. One of the big factors is access to water. For a new housing development to go in, they need to get water from somebody (this comes from studies in other parts of the country, I don’t know the particulars of water access in California). Good roads, shopping, other amenities don’t matter, as long as the developer can get some land, and hook up the water pipes at a decent price, they will build houses.

    Reply
  24. There is very little that is accurate in your post.Par. 1: People build equity in their houses until they retire then they downsize. Any value gained during their working years then goes into their retirement funds so it’s not an illusion.Par. 2: That’s your perception but everybody recognizes that new building will always happen.Par. 3: Realtors might like more expensive houses but they don’t get 6{22800fc54956079738b58e74e4dcd846757aa319aad70fcf90c97a58f3119a12} anymore (unless you got duped) and volume with more housing would make up for it anyway. I really don’t think realtor’s PAC is a major player in any election compared to all the other big money out there.Par. 4: City planners actually like high density housing – more revenue per mile of road/sewer/school bus route etc. But the residents of the city usually put up a tough fight against high density housing because they think it will bring in lower-income residents and drive down their property values. Teacher’s unions don’t like high house prices because that forces many teachers out of the district they teach in. They simply can’t afford a decent neighborhood close in town unless they’re married to a lawyer or doctor or something.One of the big factors is access to water. For a new housing development to go in they need to get water from somebody (this comes from studies in other parts of the country I don’t know the particulars of water access in California). Good roads shopping other amenities don’t matter as long as the developer can get some land and hook up the water pipes at a decent price they will build houses.

    Reply
  25. Kind of like how the U.S. was changed forever when the dirt poor Catholic Irish immigrated en masse. Then the dirty Germans and Italians, etc. At one time Milwaukee was over 1/3 German-born immigrants. Then all the Scandinavians invaded Minnesota and the Dakotas (even see “Fargo”? That’s messed up). Why didn’t we stop that from happening?

    Reply
  26. There is very little that is accurate in your post.

    Par. 1: People build equity in their houses until they retire, then they downsize. Any value gained during their working years then goes into their retirement funds, so it’s not an illusion.

    Par. 2: That’s your perception, but everybody recognizes that new building will always happen.

    Par. 3: Realtors might like more expensive houses, but they don’t get 6% anymore (unless you got duped), and volume with more housing would make up for it anyway. I really don’t think realtor’s PAC is a major player in any election, compared to all the other big money out there.

    Par. 4: City planners actually like high density housing – more revenue per mile of road/sewer/school bus route, etc. But the residents of the city usually put up a tough fight against high density housing because they think it will bring in lower-income residents and drive down their property values. Teacher’s unions don’t like high house prices, because that forces many teachers out of the district they teach in. They simply can’t afford a decent neighborhood close in town, unless they’re married to a lawyer or doctor or something.

    One of the big factors is access to water. For a new housing development to go in, they need to get water from somebody (this comes from studies in other parts of the country, I don’t know the particulars of water access in California). Good roads, shopping, other amenities don’t matter, as long as the developer can get some land, and hook up the water pipes at a decent price, they will build houses.

    Reply
  27. It might help the discussion if you listed the “easy and relatively cheap adjustments that would increase the nativity of the population” rather that leaving us guessing what you mean.

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  28. It might help the discussion if you listed the easy and relatively cheap adjustments that would increase the nativity of the population”” rather that leaving us guessing what you mean.”””

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  29. Given the history of the Ukraine having the Poles rule them was probably the golden age they look back on with fondness.

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  30. Given the history of the Ukraine having the Poles rule them was probably the golden age they look back on with fondness.

    Reply
  31. It might help the discussion if you listed the “easy and relatively cheap adjustments that would increase the nativity of the population” rather that leaving us guessing what you mean.

    Reply
  32. Especially the Maritime Provinces, which should be called The Welfare Parasites if Canadians were into actual honest political discourse.

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  33. Especially the Maritime Provinces which should be called The Welfare Parasites if Canadians were into actual honest political discourse.

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  34. Given how the sperm count of ME immigrants are higher as well as the cultural acceptance of gang raping unaccompanied women is higher, I’d say that their overall REALIZED fertility rate will prove to be much higher.

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  35. Given how the sperm count of ME immigrants are higher as well as the cultural acceptance of gang raping unaccompanied women is higher I’d say that their overall REALIZED fertility rate will prove to be much higher.

    Reply
  36. And 6% of a bigger pie is more money” I just learned that they aren’t taking that much any more. Not when median price of homes in Silicon Valley are $1 million. They are only taking 3%. That was the case when we sold my grandmother’s duplex last year in Cupertino.

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  37. And 6{22800fc54956079738b58e74e4dcd846757aa319aad70fcf90c97a58f3119a12} of a bigger pie is more money””I just learned that they aren’t taking that much any more. Not when median price of homes in Silicon Valley are $1 million. They are only taking 3{22800fc54956079738b58e74e4dcd846757aa319aad70fcf90c97a58f3119a12}. That was the case when we sold my grandmother’s duplex last year in Cupertino.”””

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  38. Kinda cold right now 😉 There is always pressure not to build because people like to see their property values climb. In a way, that is an illusion, as people generally do not intend to sell their home…unless they want to get a bigger one or one closer to town, and generally that costs more, so they really do not benefit from the increase in value. That push not to build is offset to some extent by the desire to collect more property tax. In the US…particularly California, the pressure to limit building is very high partly because of environmentalists who would prefer three quarters of us just walked off the edge of the Earth. Realtors also love it when property values go up as they generally get a cut of any home sale. And 6% of a bigger pie is more money. In the US, at least, they give a lot to political campaigns to keep things inflating. Banks love it too of course. For the last 20 years at least in San Diego county, most new building have been very expensive luxury homes (mostly 4,000 square feet+). That makes tax collectors happy. It makes city planers happy as they do not need as many new roads and such because it tends to be low population density. Bankers are happy because the loans are bigger, teacher’s unions are happier because of fatter paychecks… Ordinary Joe and Jane? Tough luck 🙁 images1.laweekly.com/imager/u/745xauto/7364392/los-angeles-average-home-square-foot-size.png

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  39. Kinda cold right now ;)There is always pressure not to build because people like to see their property values climb. In a way that is an illusion as people generally do not intend to sell their home…unless they want to get a bigger one or one closer to town and generally that costs more so they really do not benefit from the increase in value. That push not to build is offset to some extent by the desire to collect more property tax.In the US…particularly California the pressure to limit building is very high partly because of environmentalists who would prefer three quarters of us just walked off the edge of the Earth.Realtors also love it when property values go up as they generally get a cut of any home sale. And 6{22800fc54956079738b58e74e4dcd846757aa319aad70fcf90c97a58f3119a12} of a bigger pie is more money. In the US at least they give a lot to political campaigns to keep things inflating. Banks love it too of course.For the last 20 years at least in San Diego county most new building have been very expensive luxury homes (mostly 4000 square feet+). That makes tax collectors happy. It makes city planers happy as they do not need as many new roads and such because it tends to be low population density. Bankers are happy because the loans are bigger teacher’s unions are happier because of fatter paychecks…Ordinary Joe and Jane? Tough luck :(images1.laweekly.com/imager/u/745xauto/7364392/los-angeles-average-home-square-foot-size.png

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  40. I guess that’s what happens when you find black gold in your basements. Maybe Alberta should consider setting up shop in independence country. With a border with the US they would be fine and they would not have to fight with there neighbors for the pipeline. As long that oil has value, Alberta will be rich and will be taxed for it. The top 1% of this world probably feel a the Albertan’s does. And that is why they move the account in other countries with more taxes breaks.

    Reply
  41. I guess that’s what happens when you find black gold in your basements. Maybe Alberta should consider setting up shop in independence country. With a border with the US they would be fine and they would not have to fight with there neighbors for the pipeline.As long that oil has value Alberta will be rich and will be taxed for it. The top 1{22800fc54956079738b58e74e4dcd846757aa319aad70fcf90c97a58f3119a12} of this world probably feel a the Albertan’s does. And that is why they move the account in other countries with more taxes breaks.

    Reply
  42. I guess that’s what happens when you find black gold in your basements. Maybe Alberta should consider setting up shop in independence country. With a border with the US they would be fine and they would have to fight with there neighbors for the pipeline.

    Reply
  43. I guess that’s what happens when you find black gold in your basements. Maybe Alberta should consider setting up shop in independence country. With a border with the US they would be fine and they would have to fight with there neighbors for the pipeline.

    Reply
  44. I’m not sure I understand your question? Are you talking about how male immigrants compete with Canadian born, for local women?

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  45. I’m not sure I understand your question? Are you talking about how male immigrants compete with Canadian born for local women?

    Reply
  46. Usually it is very difficult to immigrate in Canada. The government values high skilled workers and you have to have at least 20,000 can$ in your bank account. The only recent exception I know of, is the Syrian humanitarian crisis. Where we accepted tens of thousands refugees, mostly families.

    Reply
  47. Usually it is very difficult to immigrate in Canada. The government values high skilled workers and you have to have at least 20000 can$ in your bank account. The only recent exception I know of is the Syrian humanitarian crisis. Where we accepted tens of thousands refugees mostly families.

    Reply
  48. I UNDERSTAND THIS, BUT CANADIANS BETTER START TO BUILD ENOUGH HOUSING:, FLATS, APARTMENT BUILDINGS AND HOUSES RIGHT NOW SINCE THERE ARE MANY CANADIAN CITIES THAT DO NOT HAVE ENOUGH HOUSING RIGHT NOW IN 2018. LIKE VICTORIA, VANCOUVER, WHITEHORSE ETC.

    Reply
  49. I UNDERSTAND THIS BUT CANADIANS BETTER START TO BUILD ENOUGH HOUSING: FLATS APARTMENT BUILDINGS AND HOUSES RIGHT NOW SINCE THERE ARE MANY CANADIAN CITIES THAT DO NOT HAVE ENOUGH HOUSING RIGHT NOW IN 2018. LIKE VICTORIA VANCOUVER WHITEHORSE ETC.

    Reply
  50. Given how the sperm count of ME immigrants are higher as well as the cultural acceptance of gang raping unaccompanied women is higher, I’d say that their overall REALIZED fertility rate will prove to be much higher.

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  51. “And 6% of a bigger pie is more money”

    I just learned that they aren’t taking that much any more. Not when median price of homes in Silicon Valley are $1 million. They are only taking 3%. That was the case when we sold my grandmother’s duplex last year in Cupertino.

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  52. Kinda cold right now 😉

    There is always pressure not to build because people like to see their property values climb. In a way, that is an illusion, as people generally do not intend to sell their home…unless they want to get a bigger one or one closer to town, and generally that costs more, so they really do not benefit from the increase in value. That push not to build is offset to some extent by the desire to collect more property tax.

    In the US…particularly California, the pressure to limit building is very high partly because of environmentalists who would prefer three quarters of us just walked off the edge of the Earth.

    Realtors also love it when property values go up as they generally get a cut of any home sale. And 6% of a bigger pie is more money. In the US, at least, they give a lot to political campaigns to keep things inflating. Banks love it too of course.

    For the last 20 years at least in San Diego county, most new building have been very expensive luxury homes (mostly 4,000 square feet+). That makes tax collectors happy. It makes city planers happy as they do not need as many new roads and such because it tends to be low population density. Bankers are happy because the loans are bigger, teacher’s unions are happier because of fatter paychecks…

    Ordinary Joe and Jane? Tough luck 🙁

    images1.laweekly.com/imager/u/745xauto/7364392/los-angeles-average-home-square-foot-size.png

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  53. Canada will pass the population of Poland in 2020″ Canada population is growing basically only due to immigration. You are not aware Brian, that in last 2 years more than 2 million Ukrainians moved to Poland, and it is estimated than in next few years another 3-5 millions may come because of war and poor economic situation. So, there are already more than 40m people living in Poland and if economy will be growing dynamically more neighbours from east probably will come. GDP PPP per person in Poland is currently around $32000 and growing by about $2000 each year. In next 4 years productivity and standard of living should approach 40k PPP per capita(today’s South Korea -41k or UK-43k) level. This is reason why I think that even more Ukrainians will be moving to Poland.

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  54. Canada will pass the population of Poland in 2020″”Canada population is growing basically only due to immigration.You are not aware Brian”” that in last 2 years more than 2 million Ukrainians moved to Poland and it is estimated than in next few years another 3-5 millions may come because of war and poor economicsituation.So”” there are already more than 40m people living in Poland and if economy will be growing dynamically more neighbours from east probably will come. GDP PPP per person in Poland is currently around $32000 and growing by about $2000 each year. In next 4 years productivity and standard of living should approach 40k PPP per capita(today’s South Korea -41k or UK-43k) level. This is reason why I think that even more Ukrainians will be moving to Poland.”””

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  55. I guess that’s what happens when you find black gold in your basements. Maybe Alberta should consider setting up shop in independence country. With a border with the US they would be fine and they would not have to fight with there neighbors for the pipeline.

    As long that oil has value, Alberta will be rich and will be taxed for it. The top 1% of this world probably feel a the Albertan’s does. And that is why they move the account in other countries with more taxes breaks.

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  56. I guess that’s what happens when you find black gold in your basements. Maybe Alberta should consider setting up shop in independence country. With a border with the US they would be fine and they would have to fight with there neighbors for the pipeline.

    Reply
  57. Usually it is very difficult to immigrate in Canada. The government values high skilled workers and you have to have at least 20,000 can$ in your bank account.
    The only recent exception I know of, is the Syrian humanitarian crisis. Where we accepted tens of thousands refugees, mostly families.

    Reply
  58. I UNDERSTAND THIS, BUT CANADIANS BETTER START TO BUILD ENOUGH HOUSING:, FLATS, APARTMENT BUILDINGS AND HOUSES RIGHT NOW SINCE THERE ARE MANY CANADIAN CITIES THAT DO NOT HAVE ENOUGH HOUSING RIGHT NOW IN 2018. LIKE VICTORIA, VANCOUVER, WHITEHORSE ETC.

    Reply
  59. Alberta birth rate is above replacement level, all other provinces have an aging population. Residents of Alberta are disproportionately taxed relative to other Canadian citizens. This taxation supports all the other under-performing remainder of the nation.

    Reply
  60. Alberta birth rate is above replacement level all other provinces have an aging population. Residents of Alberta are disproportionately taxed relative to other Canadian citizens. This taxation supports all the other under-performing remainder of the nation.

    Reply
  61. “Canada will pass the population of Poland in 2020”

    Canada population is growing basically only due to immigration.

    You are not aware Brian, that in last 2 years more than 2 million Ukrainians moved to Poland, and it is estimated than in next few years another 3-5 millions may come because of war and poor economic
    situation.

    So, there are already more than 40m people living in Poland and if economy will be growing dynamically more neighbours from east probably will come.
    GDP PPP per person in Poland is currently around $32000 and growing by about $2000 each year. In next 4 years productivity and standard of living should approach 40k PPP per capita(today’s South Korea -41k or UK-43k) level. This is reason why I think that even more Ukrainians will be moving to Poland.

    Reply
  62. Alberta birth rate is above replacement level, all other provinces have an aging population. Residents of Alberta are disproportionately taxed relative to other Canadian citizens. This taxation supports all the other under-performing remainder of the nation.

    Reply

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