Electricity boosts crop yield by 30% while reducing pesticides and fertilizers

China uses electricity instead of chemical pesticides and fertilizers to boost the growth of vegetables and fruits.

Electricity boosted vegetable output by 20 to 30 percent. Pesticide use has decreased 70 to 100 percent. And fertilizer consumption has dropped more than 20 percent.

One hectare of electrified greenhouse requires about 15 kilowatt-hours of electricity per day, which is about half the power usage of an average American family. In just two years the electrified vegetables had brought in extra revenue of nearly 1.2 million yuan (US$175,000) for one company.

Inside the greenhouse the air smells like the aftermath of a summer thunderstorm. Humidity is low and the plants rarely get sick.

The biggest expense is the installation cost which can be costing tens of thousands of yuan (a few thousand dollars per hectare).

China has been conducting the world’s largest experiment and the results are transforming agricultural production in the world’s most populous nation with a jolt.

Across the country, from Xinjiang’s remote Gobi Desert to the developed coastal areas facing the Pacific Ocean, vegetable greenhouse farms with a combined area of more than 3,600 hectares (8,895 acres) have been taking part in an “electro culture” programme funded by the Chinese government.

The vegetables grow under bare copper wires, set about three metres (10 feet) above ground level and stretching end to end under the greenhouse roof. The wires are capable of generating rapid, positive charges as high as 50,000 volts, or more than 400 times the standard residential voltage in the US.

The high frequency electricity kills bacteria and virus-transmitting diseases in the air or soil. It also suppresses the surface tension of water on leaves, accelerating vaporization.

Within the plants, the transport of naturally charged particles, such as bicarbonate and calcium ions, speed up and metabolic activities, like carbon dioxide absorption and photosynthesis, also increase.

The electric current flowing through the wires is only a few millionths of an ampere by volume – lower than a smartphone cable’s workload.

“It does absolutely no harm to the plants or to humans standing nearby,” he said.

Thanks to the positive findings of the study, the area devoted to electrified farms in China is now growing with unprecedented speed, according to Liu, from 1,000 to 1,300 hectares each year.

40% growth in electro culture farming could be achieved within the next 12 months.

246 thoughts on “Electricity boosts crop yield by 30% while reducing pesticides and fertilizers”

  1. Nothing to wonder… all life is an electric fenomen. 
    The strange thing is, that economic politicians do not intervene… after all, taxes from many different industries are lost due to this.

    Reply
  2. The Dutch also grow vegetables in green houses. I think providing a protected environment and 24×7 lighting using LEDs and the proper level of hydration you could grow high quality vegetable very productively. There are high value crops like spices, vegetables, fruits and flowers that could be profitably grown in green houses

    Reply
  3. It might be real. The soil is ground referenced so a 50kV (any referenced voltage) wire up top will leak some current onto the plants. Air has an ohm rating like everything. It might be miniscule but technically current flows. Amazing if it really is getting those results.

    Reply
  4. So, the plants are just growing in an electric field. There is actually no current flowing through them. Can’t wait to read Goats take. Sounds like snake oil to me.

    Reply
  5. The Dutch also grow vegetables in green houses. I think providing a protected environment and 24×7 lighting using LEDs and the proper level of hydration you could grow high quality vegetable very productively. There are high value crops like spices vegetables fruits and flowers that could be profitably grown in green houses

    Reply
  6. It might be real. The soil is ground referenced so a 50kV (any referenced voltage) wire up top will leak some current onto the plants. Air has an ohm rating like everything. It might be miniscule but technically current flows. Amazing if it really is getting those results.

    Reply
  7. So the plants are just growing in an electric field. There is actually no current flowing through them. Can’t wait to read Goats take. Sounds like snake oil to me.

    Reply
  8. Faster growth due to electric fields? Maybe – but less fertilizer and pesticides is probably just due to the controlled greenhouse environment. No run-off, fewer pests getting to the plants.

    Reply
  9. There should be some good data on growth beneath high transmission power lines. But going by drive by observation, stuff doesn’t appear to grow better or worse under power lines.

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  10. Higher than natural light levels can have benefits for plant growing up to several sols. Especially for growing seedlings for transplant: You tend to get very stocky plants at high light levels, they’re not putting a lot of work into growing tall to get over their assumed competitors.

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  11. Faster growth due to electric fields? Maybe – but less fertilizer and pesticides is probably just due to the controlled greenhouse environment. No run-off fewer pests getting to the plants.

    Reply
  12. There should be some good data on growth beneath high transmission power lines. But going by drive by observation stuff doesn’t appear to grow better or worse under power lines.

    Reply
  13. Higher than natural light levels can have benefits for plant growing up to several sols. Especially for growing seedlings for transplant: You tend to get very stocky plants at high light levels they’re not putting a lot of work into growing tall to get over their assumed competitors.

    Reply
  14. I’ve seen plants growing tall under electric fences, but that might have just been because the cattle were a little nervous about eating them. 😉

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  15. No mention of insects, the most significant pests of agriculture… (I don’t think bacteria and viruses even count as pests, they’re pathogens. )

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  16. Good point. The only difference I see is this one uses DC pulses (maybe technically biased AC pulses). Perhaps traditional AC that has a true negative peak at the same level as the positive peak neutralizes the effect. If your high voltage positive pulse does something to the plants, maybe an identical negative pulse undoes whatever happened.

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  17. That was my first thought too, but “smells like” is pretty subjective. Perhaps it is something else that smells like ozone, but if not, then yeah, what you said.

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  18. I’ll believe it when I replicate the results. In the mean time: “Inside the greenhouse the air smells like the aftermath of a summer thunderstorm.” Hello! That’s ozone! Ozone is great in the high atmosphere, but when ozone forms at the surface (usually as pollution from cars reacts with UV rays), it is a pollutant itself, and can damage forests, crops and hmm, people. Specifically causing decreased lung function, throat irritation, severe asthma symptoms, cough, chest pain, shortness of breath, irritation of lung tissue, and higher sensitivity to respiratory infection. Don’t tell me: “It does absolutely no harm to the plants or to humans standing nearby”

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  19. Lol I know. I was just pointing out that John’s article wasn’t much support, given the date it was written. He probably meant it as a joke.

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  20. I’ve seen plants growing tall under electric fences but that might have just been because the cattle were a little nervous about eating them. 😉

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  21. No mention of insects the most significant pests of agriculture… (I don’t think bacteria and viruses even count as pests they’re pathogens. )

    Reply
  22. Good point. The only difference I see is this one uses DC pulses (maybe technically biased AC pulses). Perhaps traditional AC that has a true negative peak at the same level as the positive peak neutralizes the effect. If your high voltage positive pulse does something to the plants maybe an identical negative pulse undoes whatever happened.

    Reply
  23. That was my first thought too but smells like”” is pretty subjective. Perhaps it is something else that smells like ozone”” but if not then yeah”” what you said.”””

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  24. I’ll believe it when I replicate the results. In the mean time: Inside the greenhouse the air smells like the aftermath of a summer thunderstorm.””Hello! That’s ozone!Ozone is great in the high atmosphere”” but when ozone forms at the surface (usually as pollution from cars reacts with UV rays) it is a pollutant itself and can damage forests crops and hmm people. Specifically causing decreased lung function throat irritation severe asthma symptoms cough chest pain shortness of breath irritation of lung tissue”” and higher sensitivity to respiratory infection.Don’t tell me: “It does absolutely no harm to the plants or to humans standing nearby””””””””

    Reply
  25. Lol I know. I was just pointing out that John’s article wasn’t much support given the date it was written. He probably meant it as a joke.

    Reply
  26. Some plants like it humid, some like it dry. For instance okra, chick peas, and peppers prefer dry weather, with water well below the surface of the ground, no mulch for them! On the other hand, tomatoes, and cucumbers like it wet, pour on the water, and the mulch.

    Reply
  27. Tobacco mosaic virus is a huge problem when growing tobacco. People working in the starting bed, and transplanting the young plants can not use tobacco products, and must step in a pan of, and wash their hands in milk before touching the plants.

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  28. So, they probably use a flyback transformer(used in a CRT) with lots loops of wire in the secondary, with the diode in the secondary circuit oriented so the secondary current creates positive voltage, when the switch in the primary opens, and the magnetic field collapses. The low voltage side of the secondary is tied to ground. voltage peak could be varied by changing the capacitance across the secondary. Presumably it’s positively charged ions that make the difference. A wire with tiny conducting fibers extending radially from the wire, ideally something like carbon nanotubes would be used. the “pointy” shape lets electrons leave the surface(tip) much more easily, and would allow the use of a much lower voltage. Maybe even a voltage that would not send a large enough current through you to be fatal. It’s a good thing the output wire is 3 meters above the ground, because you’d only touch it once, assuming you were grounded. I wonder how low the air pressure would need to be before it started making x-rays when free electrons struck the wire? You might be able to see a coronal discharge at night.

    Reply
  29. Some plants like it humid some like it dry. For instance okra chick peas and peppers prefer dry weather with water well below the surface of the ground no mulch for them! On the other hand tomatoes and cucumbers like it wet pour on the water and the mulch.

    Reply
  30. Tobacco mosaic virus is a huge problem when growing tobacco. People working in the starting bed and transplanting the young plants can not use tobacco products and must step in a pan of and wash their hands in milk before touching the plants.

    Reply
  31. So they probably use a flyback transformer(used in a CRT) with lots loops of wire in the secondary with the diode in the secondary circuit oriented so the secondary current creates positive voltage when the switch in the primary opens and the magnetic field collapses. The low voltage side of the secondary is tied to ground. voltage peak could be varied by changing the capacitance across the secondary. Presumably it’s positively charged ions that make the difference. A wire with tiny conducting fibers extending radially from the wire ideally something like carbon nanotubes would be used. the pointy”” shape lets electrons leave the surface(tip) much more easily”” and would allow the use of a much lower voltage. Maybe even a voltage that would not send a large enough current through you to be fatal. It’s a good thing the output wire is 3 meters above the ground because you’d only touch it once”” assuming you were grounded. I wonder how low the air pressure would need to be before it started making x-rays when free electrons struck the wire? You might be able to see a coronal discharge at night.”””

    Reply
  32. There’s no shortage of fraud in science anywhere. Nearly nine in 10 university clinical studies fail to report results in the European Union Clinical Trials Register (EUCTR) within the required 1-year time frame, a team from the Evidence-Based Medicine DataLab at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom reports today in The BMJ. “It is simply no longer possible to believe much of the clinical research that is published, or to rely on the judgement of trusted physicians or authoritative medical guidelines. I take no pleasure in this conclusion, which I reached slowly and reluctantly over my two decades as an editor of The New England Journal of Medicine”– Dr. Marcia Angell, physician and longtime Editor-in-Chief of The New England Medical Journal (NEMJ) We have a growing list of scientific celebrities who have committed major stem cell fraud. There is South Korea’s Hwang Woo-suk who, in 2004, falsely claimed to have created the first human embryonic stem cells by means of cloning. A few years ago, Japan’s Haruko Obokata pulled a similar con when she announced to the world a new and simple – and fake – method of turning ordinary body cells into stem cells.Paolo Macchiarini’s fake stem cell surgeries at the Karolinska Institute. “much of what is called ‘scientific evidence’ is really disease mongering designed to sell more drugs”.— John Abramson, M.D. Japanese stem cell scientist Yoshiki Sasai hanged himself in the stairwell of the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology in Kobe after he was caught up in a stem cell scandal. Sato’s fraud was one of the biggest in scientific history. http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/08/researcher-center-epic-fraud-remains-enigma-those-who-exposed-him Richard Horton, editor of The Lancet, stated that every other scientific study is false. More than 50% of the data of scientific publications does not correspond to reality, and various studies are carried out without prior analysis. Most published research papers are useless

    Reply
  33. Protein extracted from tobacco leaf is uniquely desirable as a food additive. That’s likely why the plant evolved nicotine to protect itself from being eaten. If you’ve ever walked by a field of tobacco you will notice, that unlike it’s smoke, the growing plant smells good enough to eat. The protein also has medical uses. BTW, did you know there is nicotine in tomatoes? https://www.acsh.org/news/1992/01/01/food-from-tobacco-a-well-kept-secret

    Reply
  34. There’s no shortage of fraud in science anywhere. Nearly nine in 10 university clinical studies fail to report results in the European Union Clinical Trials Register (EUCTR) within the required 1-year time frame a team from the Evidence-Based Medicine DataLab at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom reports today in The BMJ.“It is simply no longer possible to believe much of the clinical research that is published or to rely on the judgement of trusted physicians or authoritative medical guidelines. I take no pleasure in this conclusion which I reached slowly and reluctantly over my two decades as an editor of The New England Journal of Medicine”– Dr. Marcia Angell physician and longtime Editor-in-Chief of The New England Medical Journal (NEMJ)We have a growing list of scientific celebrities who have committed major stem cell fraud. There is South Korea’s Hwang Woo-suk who in 2004 falsely claimed to have created the first human embryonic stem cells by means of cloning. A few years ago Japan’s Haruko Obokata pulled a similar con when she announced to the world a new and simple – and fake – method of turning ordinary body cells into stem cells.Paolo Macchiarini’s fake stem cell surgeries at the Karolinska Institute. much of what is called ‘scientific evidence’ is really disease mongering designed to sell more drugs””.— John Abramson”” M.D.Japanese stem cell scientist Yoshiki Sasai hanged himself in the stairwell of the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology in Kobe after he was caught up in a stem cell scandal. Sato’s fraud was one of the biggest in scientific history. http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/08/researcher-center-epic-fraud-remains-enigma-those-who-exposed-himRichard Horton editor of The Lancet stated that every other scientific study is false. More than 50{22800fc54956079738b58e74e4dcd846757aa319aad70fcf90c97a58f3119a12} of the data of scientific publications does not correspond to reality and various studies are carried o”

    Reply
  35. Protein extracted from tobacco leaf is uniquely desirable as a food additive. That’s likely why the plant evolved nicotine to protect itself from being eaten. If you’ve ever walked by a field of tobacco you will notice that unlike it’s smoke the growing plant smells good enough to eat. The protein also has medical uses. BTW did you know there is nicotine in tomatoes?https://www.acsh.org/news/1992/01/01/food-from-tobacco-a-well-kept-secret

    Reply
  36. There is some truth to all this. Search Wheaton 1968, Effects of various electrical fields on seed germination. He wrote his PhD dissertation on the subject. Plants have ion channels, so they react to electricity, some very little, some a lot, some well, others not so well. Each plant, or seed, has its optimum “electro-culture” ionization. All this has been looked at for at least a few hundred years. The problem lies in commercialization. The cost of set-up and maintenance seems to outweigh eventual yield improvements. Basically you are performing controlled lightning strikes on seeds and plants. And of course this takes place where water and humidity are necessary. The Chinese effort is secret. The scientists leading the effort haven’t published their findings so it’s impossible to check their work. They do hint, however, that power usage was pretty high. Put it this way: if you have a very high-value crop (e.g., artisanal tomato) and each plant is looked after meticulously and has it’s own controlled environment, AND you also deploy air-ions, it just might be worth it. But then you need to have your own source of power.

    Reply
  37. There is some truth to all this. Search Wheaton 1968 Effects of various electrical fields on seedgermination. He wrote his PhD dissertation on the subject. Plants have ion channels so they react to electricity some very little some a lot some well others not so well. Each plant or seed has its optimum electro-culture”” ionization. All this has been looked at for at least a few hundred years. The problem lies in commercialization. The cost of set-up and maintenance seems to outweigh eventual yield improvements. Basically you are performing controlled lightning strikes on seeds and plants. And of course this takes place where water and humidity are necessary. The Chinese effort is secret. The scientists leading the effort haven’t published their findings so it’s impossible to check their work. They do hint”” however that power usage was pretty high. Put it this way: if you have a very high-value crop (e.g. artisanal tomato) and each plant is looked after meticulously and has it’s own controlled environment AND you also deploy air-ions”” it just might be worth it. But then you need to have your own source of power.”””

    Reply
  38. Actually, I have seen some research that shows at least some plants can utilize light up to several sols intensity. But, of course, that’s expensive light compared to the Sun.

    Reply
  39. Ten, but it’s easy enough to put a resistor in line so the maximum current draw isn’t damaging; He doesn’t electrocute himself on his plasma globe, after all. It’s the current that gets you, not the voltage. Additionally I’d use a high frequency anyway, as I’d probably be generating the voltage with ladder multiplier.

    Reply
  40. It’s a highly studied and well characterized plant, thanks to the tobacco industry, so if you’re doing something with genetic research in plants, you start out with a lot of your work already done. Which is no small advantage.

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  41. I have walked past a field of tobacco growing. I was lucky to get upwind of it still alive, I’m violently allergic. Made my life Hell until smoking became unpopular.

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  42. Actually I have seen some research that shows at least some plants can utilize light up to several sols intensity. But of course that’s expensive light compared to the Sun.

    Reply
  43. Ten but it’s easy enough to put a resistor in line so the maximum current draw isn’t damaging; He doesn’t electrocute himself on his plasma globe after all. It’s the current that gets you not the voltage. Additionally I’d use a high frequency anyway as I’d probably be generating the voltage with ladder multiplier.

    Reply
  44. It’s a highly studied and well characterized plant thanks to the tobacco industry so if you’re doing something with genetic research in plants you start out with a lot of your work already done. Which is no small advantage.

    Reply
  45. I have walked past a field of tobacco growing. I was lucky to get upwind of it still alive I’m violently allergic. Made my life Hell until smoking became unpopular.

    Reply
  46. Look at all the articles about genetic research on plants (even on NBF). The applied research is on rice or whatever, but most of the basic research is on tobacco. It’s like the zebrafish or fruitfly of the plant world.

    Reply
  47. Are there long term profits though? Agriculture is not that good a business in most parts of the world. You need rich land, good water and close markets to make serious money. (And for some crops cheap labour.) Having to make one of those requirements from scratch is going to be more expensive than your competitors who already have it falling out of the sky for them. How are you going to compete with free?

    Reply
  48. Look at all the articles about genetic research on plants (even on NBF). The applied research is on rice or whatever but most of the basic research is on tobacco.It’s like the zebrafish or fruitfly of the plant world.

    Reply
  49. Are there long term profits though? Agriculture is not that good a business in most parts of the world. You need rich land good water and close markets to make serious money. (And for some crops cheap labour.)Having to make one of those requirements from scratch is going to be more expensive than your competitors who already have it falling out of the sky for them. How are you going to compete with free?

    Reply
  50. Hopefully it works well for them. I think the economics of the process will pan out, no chemicals and only 15Kwh per day per hectare. You could offset your cost with solar on the roof.

    Reply
  51. Actually this is near identical to a negative ion generator which is known to kill mold and bacteria. Normally a negative ion generator gets fine tips to maximize ion flow though.

    Reply
  52. Hopefully it works well for them. I think the economics of the process will pan out no chemicals and only 15Kwh per day per hectare. You could offset your cost with solar on the roof.

    Reply
  53. Actually this is near identical to a negative ion generator which is known to kill mold and bacteria. Normally a negative ion generator gets fine tips to maximize ion flow though.

    Reply
  54. You’re right. Good comment. There’s the rub. Providing good, local food at far lower cost than the locals can make it puts lots of subsistence farmers out of an income and they can no longer grow food or earn money to buy it. Plopping down money for lots of good water, green house food, and other things to fit scale has its bane and boon in economic terms. From what I be reading, much of poverty is from government and thug / terrorist/ war causes. Someones would have to come up with meaningful employments. What happens in China to farmers if this gets big there? Or in Canada, USA, or other nations?

    Reply
  55. You’re right. Good comment. There’s the rub. Providing good local food at far lower cost than the locals can make it puts lots of subsistence farmers out of an income and they can no longer grow food or earn money to buy it. Plopping down money for lots of good water green house food and other things to fit scale has its bane and boon in economic terms. From what I be reading much of poverty is from government and thug / terrorist/ war causes. Someones would have to come up with meaningful employments. What happens in China to farmers if this gets big there? Or in Canada USA or other nations?

    Reply
  56. I don’t think that solves anything unless they sterilize every piece of dirt and is hermetically sealed thereafter, with people inside. Any egg laying insect that makes it’s way inside will have the greatest feast ever.

    Reply
  57. I don’t think that solves anything unless they sterilize every piece of dirt and is hermetically sealed thereafter with people inside. Any egg laying insect that makes it’s way inside will have the greatest feast ever.

    Reply
  58. It might be interesting to use a DC current, to see if the effect was dependent on varying voltage. Van Der Graaf generator anyone?

    Reply
  59. Nicotine sulfate is a very useful insecticide, because at levels highly toxic to insects, it is not toxic to most mammals, birds, or reptiles, and is readily metabolised, unlike some synthetics. It is a particularly desirable insecticide for aphids, which are resistant to many insecticides since they feed on sap, from inside a plant. Also, unlike some insecticides it is not concentrated in the food chain.

    Reply
  60. I’d tell you to read the article I linked, but Vuukle(crappy) deleted the link. I miss all the other commenting software this site has tried. Seems like they would compile a list of links to delete, or a list of domains to allow.

    Reply
  61. It might be interesting to use a DC current to see if the effect was dependent on varying voltage. Van Der Graaf generator anyone?

    Reply
  62. Nicotine sulfate is a very useful insecticide because at levels highly toxic to insects it is not toxic to most mammals birds or reptiles and is readily metabolised unlike some synthetics. It is a particularly desirable insecticide for aphids which are resistant to many insecticides since they feed on sap from inside a plant.Also unlike some insecticides it is not concentrated in the food chain.

    Reply
  63. I’d tell you to read the article I linked but Vuukle(crappy) deleted the link. I miss all the other commenting software this site has tried. Seems like they would compile a list of links to delete or a list of domains to allow.

    Reply
  64. Tobacco has a number of alkaloids in it, so it would likely be bitter. There is one that is supposed to be a fantastic anti-inflammatory, and may be effective in the treatment of type 2 diabetes called anabasine. You might want to leave that one in.

    Reply
  65. Tobacco has a number of alkaloids in it so it would likely be bitter. There is one that is supposed to be a fantastic anti-inflammatory and may be effective in the treatment of type 2 diabetes called anabasine. You might want to leave that one in.

    Reply
  66. Tobacco has a number of alkaloids in it, so it would likely be bitter. There is one that is supposed to be a fantastic anti-inflammatory, and may be effective in the treatment of type 2 diabetes called anabasine. You might want to leave that one in.

    Reply
  67. Tobacco has a number of alkaloids in it so it would likely be bitter. There is one that is supposed to be a fantastic anti-inflammatory and may be effective in the treatment of type 2 diabetes called anabasine. You might want to leave that one in.

    Reply
  68. It might be interesting to use a DC current, to see if the effect was dependent on varying voltage. Van Der Graaf generator anyone?

    Reply
  69. It might be interesting to use a DC current to see if the effect was dependent on varying voltage. Van Der Graaf generator anyone?

    Reply
  70. Nicotine sulfate is a very useful insecticide, because at levels highly toxic to insects, it is not toxic to most mammals, birds, or reptiles, and is readily metabolised, unlike some synthetics. It is a particularly desirable insecticide for aphids, which are resistant to many insecticides since they feed on sap, from inside a plant. Also, unlike some insecticides it is not concentrated in the food chain.

    Reply
  71. Nicotine sulfate is a very useful insecticide because at levels highly toxic to insects it is not toxic to most mammals birds or reptiles and is readily metabolised unlike some synthetics. It is a particularly desirable insecticide for aphids which are resistant to many insecticides since they feed on sap from inside a plant.Also unlike some insecticides it is not concentrated in the food chain.

    Reply
  72. I’d tell you to read the article I linked, but Vuukle(crappy) deleted the link. I miss all the other commenting software this site has tried. Seems like they would compile a list of links to delete, or a list of domains to allow.

    Reply
  73. I’d tell you to read the article I linked but Vuukle(crappy) deleted the link. I miss all the other commenting software this site has tried. Seems like they would compile a list of links to delete or a list of domains to allow.

    Reply
  74. Tobacco has a number of alkaloids in it, so it would likely be bitter. There is one that is supposed to be a fantastic anti-inflammatory, and may be effective in the treatment of type 2 diabetes called anabasine. You might want to leave that one in.

    Reply
  75. Nicotine sulfate is a very useful insecticide, because at levels highly toxic to insects, it is not toxic to most mammals, birds, or reptiles, and is readily metabolised, unlike some synthetics. It is a particularly desirable insecticide for aphids, which are resistant to many insecticides since they feed on sap, from inside a plant.
    Also, unlike some insecticides it is not concentrated in the food chain.

    Reply
  76. I’d tell you to read the article I linked, but Vuukle(crappy) deleted the link. I miss all the other commenting software this site has tried. Seems like they would compile a list of links to delete, or a list of domains to allow.

    Reply
  77. I don’t think that solves anything unless they sterilize every piece of dirt and is hermetically sealed thereafter, with people inside. Any egg laying insect that makes it’s way inside will have the greatest feast ever.

    Reply
  78. I don’t think that solves anything unless they sterilize every piece of dirt and is hermetically sealed thereafter with people inside. Any egg laying insect that makes it’s way inside will have the greatest feast ever.

    Reply
  79. You’re right. Good comment. There’s the rub. Providing good, local food at far lower cost than the locals can make it puts lots of subsistence farmers out of an income and they can no longer grow food or earn money to buy it. Plopping down money for lots of good water, green house food, and other things to fit scale has its bane and boon in economic terms. From what I be reading, much of poverty is from government and thug / terrorist/ war causes. Someones would have to come up with meaningful employments. What happens in China to farmers if this gets big there? Or in Canada, USA, or other nations?

    Reply
  80. You’re right. Good comment. There’s the rub. Providing good local food at far lower cost than the locals can make it puts lots of subsistence farmers out of an income and they can no longer grow food or earn money to buy it. Plopping down money for lots of good water green house food and other things to fit scale has its bane and boon in economic terms. From what I be reading much of poverty is from government and thug / terrorist/ war causes. Someones would have to come up with meaningful employments. What happens in China to farmers if this gets big there? Or in Canada USA or other nations?

    Reply
  81. Hopefully it works well for them. I think the economics of the process will pan out, no chemicals and only 15Kwh per day per hectare. You could offset your cost with solar on the roof.

    Reply
  82. Hopefully it works well for them. I think the economics of the process will pan out no chemicals and only 15Kwh per day per hectare. You could offset your cost with solar on the roof.

    Reply
  83. Actually this is near identical to a negative ion generator which is known to kill mold and bacteria. Normally a negative ion generator gets fine tips to maximize ion flow though.

    Reply
  84. Actually this is near identical to a negative ion generator which is known to kill mold and bacteria. Normally a negative ion generator gets fine tips to maximize ion flow though.

    Reply
  85. I don’t think that solves anything unless they sterilize every piece of dirt and is hermetically sealed thereafter, with people inside. Any egg laying insect that makes it’s way inside will have the greatest feast ever.

    Reply
  86. You’re right. Good comment. There’s the rub. Providing good, local food at far lower cost than the locals can make it puts lots of subsistence farmers out of an income and they can no longer grow food or earn money to buy it. Plopping down money for lots of good water, green house food, and other things to fit scale has its bane and boon in economic terms. From what I be reading, much of poverty is from government and thug / terrorist/ war causes. Someones would have to come up with meaningful employments. What happens in China to farmers if this gets big there? Or in Canada, USA, or other nations?

    Reply
  87. Actually this is near identical to a negative ion generator which is known to kill mold and bacteria. Normally a negative ion generator gets fine tips to maximize ion flow though.

    Reply
  88. Look at all the articles about genetic research on plants (even on NBF). The applied research is on rice or whatever, but most of the basic research is on tobacco. It’s like the zebrafish or fruitfly of the plant world.

    Reply
  89. Look at all the articles about genetic research on plants (even on NBF). The applied research is on rice or whatever but most of the basic research is on tobacco.It’s like the zebrafish or fruitfly of the plant world.

    Reply
  90. Are there long term profits though? Agriculture is not that good a business in most parts of the world. You need rich land, good water and close markets to make serious money. (And for some crops cheap labour.) Having to make one of those requirements from scratch is going to be more expensive than your competitors who already have it falling out of the sky for them. How are you going to compete with free?

    Reply
  91. Are there long term profits though? Agriculture is not that good a business in most parts of the world. You need rich land good water and close markets to make serious money. (And for some crops cheap labour.)Having to make one of those requirements from scratch is going to be more expensive than your competitors who already have it falling out of the sky for them. How are you going to compete with free?

    Reply
  92. Actually, I have seen some research that shows at least some plants can utilize light up to several sols intensity. But, of course, that’s expensive light compared to the Sun.

    Reply
  93. Actually I have seen some research that shows at least some plants can utilize light up to several sols intensity. But of course that’s expensive light compared to the Sun.

    Reply
  94. Ten, but it’s easy enough to put a resistor in line so the maximum current draw isn’t damaging; He doesn’t electrocute himself on his plasma globe, after all. It’s the current that gets you, not the voltage. Additionally I’d use a high frequency anyway, as I’d probably be generating the voltage with ladder multiplier.

    Reply
  95. Ten but it’s easy enough to put a resistor in line so the maximum current draw isn’t damaging; He doesn’t electrocute himself on his plasma globe after all. It’s the current that gets you not the voltage. Additionally I’d use a high frequency anyway as I’d probably be generating the voltage with ladder multiplier.

    Reply
  96. It’s a highly studied and well characterized plant, thanks to the tobacco industry, so if you’re doing something with genetic research in plants, you start out with a lot of your work already done. Which is no small advantage.

    Reply
  97. It’s a highly studied and well characterized plant thanks to the tobacco industry so if you’re doing something with genetic research in plants you start out with a lot of your work already done. Which is no small advantage.

    Reply
  98. I have walked past a field of tobacco growing. I was lucky to get upwind of it still alive, I’m violently allergic. Made my life Hell until smoking became unpopular.

    Reply
  99. I have walked past a field of tobacco growing. I was lucky to get upwind of it still alive I’m violently allergic. Made my life Hell until smoking became unpopular.

    Reply
  100. There is some truth to all this. Search Wheaton 1968, Effects of various electrical fields on seed germination. He wrote his PhD dissertation on the subject. Plants have ion channels, so they react to electricity, some very little, some a lot, some well, others not so well. Each plant, or seed, has its optimum “electro-culture” ionization. All this has been looked at for at least a few hundred years. The problem lies in commercialization. The cost of set-up and maintenance seems to outweigh eventual yield improvements. Basically you are performing controlled lightning strikes on seeds and plants. And of course this takes place where water and humidity are necessary. The Chinese effort is secret. The scientists leading the effort haven’t published their findings so it’s impossible to check their work. They do hint, however, that power usage was pretty high. Put it this way: if you have a very high-value crop (e.g., artisanal tomato) and each plant is looked after meticulously and has it’s own controlled environment, AND you also deploy air-ions, it just might be worth it. But then you need to have your own source of power.

    Reply
  101. There is some truth to all this. Search Wheaton 1968 Effects of various electrical fields on seedgermination. He wrote his PhD dissertation on the subject. Plants have ion channels so they react to electricity some very little some a lot some well others not so well. Each plant or seed has its optimum electro-culture”” ionization. All this has been looked at for at least a few hundred years. The problem lies in commercialization. The cost of set-up and maintenance seems to outweigh eventual yield improvements. Basically you are performing controlled lightning strikes on seeds and plants. And of course this takes place where water and humidity are necessary. The Chinese effort is secret. The scientists leading the effort haven’t published their findings so it’s impossible to check their work. They do hint”” however that power usage was pretty high. Put it this way: if you have a very high-value crop (e.g. artisanal tomato) and each plant is looked after meticulously and has it’s own controlled environment AND you also deploy air-ions”” it just might be worth it. But then you need to have your own source of power.”””

    Reply
  102. Look at all the articles about genetic research on plants (even on NBF). The applied research is on rice or whatever, but most of the basic research is on tobacco.

    It’s like the zebrafish or fruitfly of the plant world.

    Reply
  103. Are there long term profits though? Agriculture is not that good a business in most parts of the world. You need rich land, good water and close markets to make serious money. (And for some crops cheap labour.)
    Having to make one of those requirements from scratch is going to be more expensive than your competitors who already have it falling out of the sky for them. How are you going to compete with free?

    Reply
  104. There’s no shortage of fraud in science anywhere. Nearly nine in 10 university clinical studies fail to report results in the European Union Clinical Trials Register (EUCTR) within the required 1-year time frame, a team from the Evidence-Based Medicine DataLab at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom reports today in The BMJ. “It is simply no longer possible to believe much of the clinical research that is published, or to rely on the judgement of trusted physicians or authoritative medical guidelines. I take no pleasure in this conclusion, which I reached slowly and reluctantly over my two decades as an editor of The New England Journal of Medicine”– Dr. Marcia Angell, physician and longtime Editor-in-Chief of The New England Medical Journal (NEMJ) We have a growing list of scientific celebrities who have committed major stem cell fraud. There is South Korea’s Hwang Woo-suk who, in 2004, falsely claimed to have created the first human embryonic stem cells by means of cloning. A few years ago, Japan’s Haruko Obokata pulled a similar con when she announced to the world a new and simple – and fake – method of turning ordinary body cells into stem cells.Paolo Macchiarini’s fake stem cell surgeries at the Karolinska Institute. “much of what is called ‘scientific evidence’ is really disease mongering designed to sell more drugs”.— John Abramson, M.D. Japanese stem cell scientist Yoshiki Sasai hanged himself in the stairwell of the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology in Kobe after he was caught up in a stem cell scandal. Sato’s fraud was one of the biggest in scientific history. http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/08/researcher-center-epic-fraud-remains-enigma-those-who-exposed-him Richard Horton, editor of The Lancet, stated that every other scientific study is false. More than 50% of the data of scientific publications does not correspond to reality, and various studies are carried out without prior analysis. Most published research papers are useless

    Reply
  105. There’s no shortage of fraud in science anywhere. Nearly nine in 10 university clinical studies fail to report results in the European Union Clinical Trials Register (EUCTR) within the required 1-year time frame a team from the Evidence-Based Medicine DataLab at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom reports today in The BMJ.“It is simply no longer possible to believe much of the clinical research that is published or to rely on the judgement of trusted physicians or authoritative medical guidelines. I take no pleasure in this conclusion which I reached slowly and reluctantly over my two decades as an editor of The New England Journal of Medicine”– Dr. Marcia Angell physician and longtime Editor-in-Chief of The New England Medical Journal (NEMJ)We have a growing list of scientific celebrities who have committed major stem cell fraud. There is South Korea’s Hwang Woo-suk who in 2004 falsely claimed to have created the first human embryonic stem cells by means of cloning. A few years ago Japan’s Haruko Obokata pulled a similar con when she announced to the world a new and simple – and fake – method of turning ordinary body cells into stem cells.Paolo Macchiarini’s fake stem cell surgeries at the Karolinska Institute. much of what is called ‘scientific evidence’ is really disease mongering designed to sell more drugs””.— John Abramson”” M.D.Japanese stem cell scientist Yoshiki Sasai hanged himself in the stairwell of the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology in Kobe after he was caught up in a stem cell scandal. Sato’s fraud was one of the biggest in scientific history. http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/08/researcher-center-epic-fraud-remains-enigma-those-who-exposed-himRichard Horton editor of The Lancet stated that every other scientific study is false. More than 50{22800fc54956079738b58e74e4dcd846757aa319aad70fcf90c97a58f3119a12} of the data of scientific publications does not correspond to reality and various studies are carried o”

    Reply
  106. Protein extracted from tobacco leaf is uniquely desirable as a food additive. That’s likely why the plant evolved nicotine to protect itself from being eaten. If you’ve ever walked by a field of tobacco you will notice, that unlike it’s smoke, the growing plant smells good enough to eat. The protein also has medical uses. BTW, did you know there is nicotine in tomatoes? https://www.acsh.org/news/1992/01/01/food-from-tobacco-a-well-kept-secret

    Reply
  107. Protein extracted from tobacco leaf is uniquely desirable as a food additive. That’s likely why the plant evolved nicotine to protect itself from being eaten. If you’ve ever walked by a field of tobacco you will notice that unlike it’s smoke the growing plant smells good enough to eat. The protein also has medical uses. BTW did you know there is nicotine in tomatoes?https://www.acsh.org/news/1992/01/01/food-from-tobacco-a-well-kept-secret

    Reply
  108. Ten, but it’s easy enough to put a resistor in line so the maximum current draw isn’t damaging; He doesn’t electrocute himself on his plasma globe, after all. It’s the current that gets you, not the voltage. Additionally I’d use a high frequency anyway, as I’d probably be generating the voltage with ladder multiplier.

    Reply
  109. It’s a highly studied and well characterized plant, thanks to the tobacco industry, so if you’re doing something with genetic research in plants, you start out with a lot of your work already done. Which is no small advantage.

    Reply
  110. There is some truth to all this. Search Wheaton 1968, Effects of various electrical fields on seed
    germination. He wrote his PhD dissertation on the subject. Plants have ion channels, so they react to electricity, some very little, some a lot, some well, others not so well. Each plant, or seed, has its optimum “electro-culture” ionization. All this has been looked at for at least a few hundred years.

    The problem lies in commercialization. The cost of set-up and maintenance seems to outweigh eventual yield improvements. Basically you are performing controlled lightning strikes on seeds and plants. And of course this takes place where water and humidity are necessary.

    The Chinese effort is secret. The scientists leading the effort haven’t published their findings so it’s impossible to check their work. They do hint, however, that power usage was pretty high.

    Put it this way: if you have a very high-value crop (e.g., artisanal tomato) and each plant is looked after meticulously and has it’s own controlled environment, AND you also deploy air-ions, it just might be worth it. But then you need to have your own source of power.

    Reply
  111. Some plants like it humid, some like it dry. For instance okra, chick peas, and peppers prefer dry weather, with water well below the surface of the ground, no mulch for them! On the other hand, tomatoes, and cucumbers like it wet, pour on the water, and the mulch.

    Reply
  112. Some plants like it humid some like it dry. For instance okra chick peas and peppers prefer dry weather with water well below the surface of the ground no mulch for them! On the other hand tomatoes and cucumbers like it wet pour on the water and the mulch.

    Reply
  113. Tobacco mosaic virus is a huge problem when growing tobacco. People working in the starting bed, and transplanting the young plants can not use tobacco products, and must step in a pan of, and wash their hands in milk before touching the plants.

    Reply
  114. Tobacco mosaic virus is a huge problem when growing tobacco. People working in the starting bed and transplanting the young plants can not use tobacco products and must step in a pan of and wash their hands in milk before touching the plants.

    Reply
  115. So, they probably use a flyback transformer(used in a CRT) with lots loops of wire in the secondary, with the diode in the secondary circuit oriented so the secondary current creates positive voltage, when the switch in the primary opens, and the magnetic field collapses. The low voltage side of the secondary is tied to ground. voltage peak could be varied by changing the capacitance across the secondary. Presumably it’s positively charged ions that make the difference. A wire with tiny conducting fibers extending radially from the wire, ideally something like carbon nanotubes would be used. the “pointy” shape lets electrons leave the surface(tip) much more easily, and would allow the use of a much lower voltage. Maybe even a voltage that would not send a large enough current through you to be fatal. It’s a good thing the output wire is 3 meters above the ground, because you’d only touch it once, assuming you were grounded. I wonder how low the air pressure would need to be before it started making x-rays when free electrons struck the wire? You might be able to see a coronal discharge at night.

    Reply
  116. So they probably use a flyback transformer(used in a CRT) with lots loops of wire in the secondary with the diode in the secondary circuit oriented so the secondary current creates positive voltage when the switch in the primary opens and the magnetic field collapses. The low voltage side of the secondary is tied to ground. voltage peak could be varied by changing the capacitance across the secondary. Presumably it’s positively charged ions that make the difference. A wire with tiny conducting fibers extending radially from the wire ideally something like carbon nanotubes would be used. the pointy”” shape lets electrons leave the surface(tip) much more easily”” and would allow the use of a much lower voltage. Maybe even a voltage that would not send a large enough current through you to be fatal. It’s a good thing the output wire is 3 meters above the ground because you’d only touch it once”” assuming you were grounded. I wonder how low the air pressure would need to be before it started making x-rays when free electrons struck the wire? You might be able to see a coronal discharge at night.”””

    Reply
  117. I’ve seen plants growing tall under electric fences, but that might have just been because the cattle were a little nervous about eating them. 😉

    Reply
  118. I’ve seen plants growing tall under electric fences but that might have just been because the cattle were a little nervous about eating them. 😉

    Reply
  119. No mention of insects, the most significant pests of agriculture… (I don’t think bacteria and viruses even count as pests, they’re pathogens. )

    Reply
  120. No mention of insects the most significant pests of agriculture… (I don’t think bacteria and viruses even count as pests they’re pathogens. )

    Reply
  121. Good point. The only difference I see is this one uses DC pulses (maybe technically biased AC pulses). Perhaps traditional AC that has a true negative peak at the same level as the positive peak neutralizes the effect. If your high voltage positive pulse does something to the plants, maybe an identical negative pulse undoes whatever happened.

    Reply
  122. Good point. The only difference I see is this one uses DC pulses (maybe technically biased AC pulses). Perhaps traditional AC that has a true negative peak at the same level as the positive peak neutralizes the effect. If your high voltage positive pulse does something to the plants maybe an identical negative pulse undoes whatever happened.

    Reply
  123. That was my first thought too, but “smells like” is pretty subjective. Perhaps it is something else that smells like ozone, but if not, then yeah, what you said.

    Reply
  124. That was my first thought too but smells like”” is pretty subjective. Perhaps it is something else that smells like ozone”” but if not then yeah”” what you said.”””

    Reply
  125. I’ll believe it when I replicate the results. In the mean time: “Inside the greenhouse the air smells like the aftermath of a summer thunderstorm.” Hello! That’s ozone! Ozone is great in the high atmosphere, but when ozone forms at the surface (usually as pollution from cars reacts with UV rays), it is a pollutant itself, and can damage forests, crops and hmm, people. Specifically causing decreased lung function, throat irritation, severe asthma symptoms, cough, chest pain, shortness of breath, irritation of lung tissue, and higher sensitivity to respiratory infection. Don’t tell me: “It does absolutely no harm to the plants or to humans standing nearby”

    Reply
  126. I’ll believe it when I replicate the results. In the mean time: Inside the greenhouse the air smells like the aftermath of a summer thunderstorm.””Hello! That’s ozone!Ozone is great in the high atmosphere”” but when ozone forms at the surface (usually as pollution from cars reacts with UV rays) it is a pollutant itself and can damage forests crops and hmm people. Specifically causing decreased lung function throat irritation severe asthma symptoms cough chest pain shortness of breath irritation of lung tissue”” and higher sensitivity to respiratory infection.Don’t tell me: “It does absolutely no harm to the plants or to humans standing nearby””””””””

    Reply
  127. Lol I know. I was just pointing out that John’s article wasn’t much support, given the date it was written. He probably meant it as a joke.

    Reply
  128. Lol I know. I was just pointing out that John’s article wasn’t much support given the date it was written. He probably meant it as a joke.

    Reply
  129. Faster growth due to electric fields? Maybe – but less fertilizer and pesticides is probably just due to the controlled greenhouse environment. No run-off, fewer pests getting to the plants.

    Reply
  130. Faster growth due to electric fields? Maybe – but less fertilizer and pesticides is probably just due to the controlled greenhouse environment. No run-off fewer pests getting to the plants.

    Reply
  131. There’s no shortage of fraud in science anywhere. Nearly nine in 10 university clinical studies fail to report results in the European Union Clinical Trials Register (EUCTR) within the required 1-year time frame, a team from the Evidence-Based Medicine DataLab at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom reports today in The BMJ.

    “It is simply no longer possible to believe much of the clinical research that is published, or to rely on the judgement of trusted physicians or authoritative medical guidelines. I take no pleasure in this conclusion, which I reached slowly and reluctantly over my two decades as an editor of The New England Journal of Medicine”– Dr. Marcia Angell, physician and longtime Editor-in-Chief of The New England Medical Journal (NEMJ)

    We have a growing list of scientific celebrities who have committed major stem cell fraud. There is South Korea’s Hwang Woo-suk who, in 2004, falsely claimed to have created the first human embryonic stem cells by means of cloning. A few years ago, Japan’s Haruko Obokata pulled a similar con when she announced to the world a new and simple – and fake – method of turning ordinary body cells into stem cells.Paolo Macchiarini’s fake stem cell surgeries at the Karolinska Institute.

    “much of what is called ‘scientific evidence’ is really disease mongering designed to sell more drugs”.— John Abramson, M.D.

    Japanese stem cell scientist Yoshiki Sasai hanged himself in the stairwell of the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology in Kobe after he was caught up in a stem cell scandal. Sato’s fraud was one of the biggest in scientific history. http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/08/researcher-center-epic-fraud-remains-enigma-those-who-exposed-him

    Richard Horton, editor of The Lancet, stated that every other scientific study is false. More than 50% of the data of scientific publications does not correspond to reality, and various studies are carried out without prior analysis.

    Most published research papers are useless. And all the more useless is unpublished research is, apart from useless, orders of magnitude more voluminous. Official estimates indicate >50% (perhaps >80% according with some serious sources) of published empirical observations cannot be reproduced by trained peers. We can only imagine what led a given colleague to describe results that cannot be obtained by others. But in reality almost nobody cares. Add to this reality that roughly 10% of what is done in scientific research ever gets published. Conclusion: almost all academic scientific research is as useful as the forgotten dreams of every night, and everyone is paying to sustain this… monkey business.

    Reply
  132. There should be some good data on growth beneath high transmission power lines. But going by drive by observation, stuff doesn’t appear to grow better or worse under power lines.

    Reply
  133. There should be some good data on growth beneath high transmission power lines. But going by drive by observation stuff doesn’t appear to grow better or worse under power lines.

    Reply
  134. Higher than natural light levels can have benefits for plant growing up to several sols. Especially for growing seedlings for transplant: You tend to get very stocky plants at high light levels, they’re not putting a lot of work into growing tall to get over their assumed competitors.

    Reply
  135. Higher than natural light levels can have benefits for plant growing up to several sols. Especially for growing seedlings for transplant: You tend to get very stocky plants at high light levels they’re not putting a lot of work into growing tall to get over their assumed competitors.

    Reply
  136. Protein extracted from tobacco leaf is uniquely desirable as a food additive. That’s likely why the plant evolved nicotine to protect itself from being eaten. If you’ve ever walked by a field of tobacco you will notice, that unlike it’s smoke, the growing plant smells good enough to eat. The protein also has medical uses. BTW, did you know there is nicotine in tomatoes?
    https://www.acsh.org/news/1992/01/01/food-from-tobacco-a-well-kept-secret

    Reply
  137. The Dutch also grow vegetables in green houses. I think providing a protected environment and 24×7 lighting using LEDs and the proper level of hydration you could grow high quality vegetable very productively. There are high value crops like spices, vegetables, fruits and flowers that could be profitably grown in green houses

    Reply
  138. The Dutch also grow vegetables in green houses. I think providing a protected environment and 24×7 lighting using LEDs and the proper level of hydration you could grow high quality vegetable very productively. There are high value crops like spices vegetables fruits and flowers that could be profitably grown in green houses

    Reply
  139. It might be real. The soil is ground referenced so a 50kV (any referenced voltage) wire up top will leak some current onto the plants. Air has an ohm rating like everything. It might be miniscule but technically current flows. Amazing if it really is getting those results.

    Reply
  140. It might be real. The soil is ground referenced so a 50kV (any referenced voltage) wire up top will leak some current onto the plants. Air has an ohm rating like everything. It might be miniscule but technically current flows. Amazing if it really is getting those results.

    Reply
  141. So, the plants are just growing in an electric field. There is actually no current flowing through them. Can’t wait to read Goats take. Sounds like snake oil to me.

    Reply
  142. So the plants are just growing in an electric field. There is actually no current flowing through them. Can’t wait to read Goats take. Sounds like snake oil to me.

    Reply
  143. Some plants like it humid, some like it dry. For instance okra, chick peas, and peppers prefer dry weather, with water well below the surface of the ground, no mulch for them! On the other hand, tomatoes, and cucumbers like it wet, pour on the water, and the mulch.

    Reply
  144. Tobacco mosaic virus is a huge problem when growing tobacco. People working in the starting bed, and transplanting the young plants can not use tobacco products, and must step in a pan of, and wash their hands in milk before touching the plants.

    Reply
  145. So, they probably use a flyback transformer(used in a CRT) with lots loops of wire in the secondary, with the diode in the secondary circuit oriented so the secondary current creates positive voltage, when the switch in the primary opens, and the magnetic field collapses. The low voltage side of the secondary is tied to ground. voltage peak could be varied by changing the capacitance across the secondary. Presumably it’s positively charged ions that make the difference.
    A wire with tiny conducting fibers extending radially from the wire, ideally something like carbon nanotubes would be used. the “pointy” shape lets electrons leave the surface(tip) much more easily, and would allow the use of a much lower voltage. Maybe even a voltage that would not send a large enough current through you to be fatal.
    It’s a good thing the output wire is 3 meters above the ground, because you’d only touch it once, assuming you were grounded. I wonder how low the air pressure would need to be before it started making x-rays when free electrons struck the wire? You might be able to see a coronal discharge at night.

    Reply
  146. Good point. The only difference I see is this one uses DC pulses (maybe technically biased AC pulses). Perhaps traditional AC that has a true negative peak at the same level as the positive peak neutralizes the effect. If your high voltage positive pulse does something to the plants, maybe an identical negative pulse undoes whatever happened.

    Reply
  147. I’ll believe it when I replicate the results.

    In the mean time: “Inside the greenhouse the air smells like the aftermath of a summer thunderstorm.”

    Hello! That’s ozone!

    Ozone is great in the high atmosphere, but when ozone forms at the surface (usually as pollution from cars reacts with UV rays), it is a pollutant itself, and can damage forests, crops and hmm, people. Specifically causing decreased lung function, throat irritation, severe asthma symptoms, cough, chest pain, shortness of breath, irritation of lung tissue, and higher sensitivity to respiratory infection.

    Don’t tell me: “It does absolutely no harm to the plants or to humans standing nearby”

    Reply
  148. Faster growth due to electric fields? Maybe – but less fertilizer and pesticides is probably just due to the controlled greenhouse environment. No run-off, fewer pests getting to the plants.

    Reply
  149. Higher than natural light levels can have benefits for plant growing up to several sols. Especially for growing seedlings for transplant: You tend to get very stocky plants at high light levels, they’re not putting a lot of work into growing tall to get over their assumed competitors.

    Reply
  150. The Dutch also grow vegetables in green houses. I think providing a protected environment and 24×7 lighting using LEDs and the proper level of hydration you could grow high quality vegetable very productively.

    There are high value crops like spices, vegetables, fruits and flowers that could be profitably grown in green houses

    Reply
  151. It might be real. The soil is ground referenced so a 50kV (any referenced voltage) wire up top will leak some current onto the plants. Air has an ohm rating like everything. It might be miniscule but technically current flows. Amazing if it really is getting those results.

    Reply

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