Hong Kong to China high speed rail speed advantage tested

South China Morning Post writers had a race of plane and buses versus the new high-speed rail from Hong Kong to Guangzhou.

* MTR and the mainland’s intercity harmony train – 3 hours 41 minutes, cost: HK$141 (USD18)
* airplane MTR and taxi — 3 hours 43 minutes. Cost: HK$1,841.60 (USD236)
* Kowloon-Canton intercity through-train. 3 hours 44 minutes, Total cost: HK$268 (USD34)
* cross-border bus 4 hours, HK$114.90 (USD15)
* bus and taxi. 4 hours 10 minutes, cost: HK$674.08 (USD86)
* high-speed train with stops, 3 hours 28 minutes, cost: HK$369 (USD47)
* high-speed train without stops, can be a few minutes faster

The high-speed rail was the fastest by 13 to 43 minutes versus other modes. There are time factors depending upon where you start from in Hong Kong and where you are going in Guangzhou.

25 thoughts on “Hong Kong to China high speed rail speed advantage tested”

  1. So, according to Google it takes about 2 hours to go from the Shenzhen border of Hong Kong to central Guangzhou. Not counting whatever it takes to get through customs, it’s about 30 minutes from that spot to central Hong Kong. I get that cars aren’t always an option and I have no idea what the lines at customs are like. It’s just, if it doesn’t go faster than a car, why is it called high speed rail? Isn’t it just normal rail? It does look very pretty and streamlined in the picture.

    Reply
  2. So according to Google it takes about 2 hours to go from the Shenzhen border of Hong Kong to central Guangzhou. Not counting whatever it takes to get through customs it’s about 30 minutes from that spot to central Hong Kong. I get that cars aren’t always an option and I have no idea what the lines at customs are like. It’s just if it doesn’t go faster than a car why is it called high speed rail? Isn’t it just normal rail? It does look very pretty and streamlined in the picture.

    Reply
  3. Hong Kong is part of China, and it isn’t. Part of the agreement for the handover was that Hong Kong residents would have certain rights that are not available to mainland Chinese. One reason why this train is controversial is that mainland Chinese seek to impose their rules with it in Hong Kong.

    Reply
  4. Hong Kong is part of China and it isn’t. Part of the agreement for the handover was that Hong Kong residents would have certain rights that are not available to mainland Chinese. One reason why this train is controversial is that mainland Chinese seek to impose their rules with it in Hong Kong.

    Reply
  5. When flying from Canada into US, you clear US customs at the Canadian airport which then frees passengers to go to any US airport’s domestic terminal. Similar setup when taking Eurostar from London. You clear customs at the departure and then are free to get off any any station without further immigration proceedings. It’s the first such setup for Hong Kong, hence the added panic.

    Reply
  6. When flying from Canada into US you clear US customs at the Canadian airport which then frees passengers to go to any US airport’s domestic terminal. Similar setup when taking Eurostar from London. You clear customs at the departure and then are free to get off any any station without further immigration proceedings. It’s the first such setup for Hong Kong hence the added panic.

    Reply
  7. When flying from Canada into US, you clear US customs at the Canadian airport which then frees passengers to go to any US airport’s domestic terminal. Similar setup when taking Eurostar from London. You clear customs at the departure and then are free to get off any any station without further immigration proceedings. It’s the first such setup for Hong Kong, hence the added panic.

    Reply
  8. When flying from Canada into US you clear US customs at the Canadian airport which then frees passengers to go to any US airport’s domestic terminal. Similar setup when taking Eurostar from London. You clear customs at the departure and then are free to get off any any station without further immigration proceedings. It’s the first such setup for Hong Kong hence the added panic.

    Reply
  9. When flying from Canada into US, you clear US customs at the Canadian airport which then frees passengers to go to any US airport’s domestic terminal. Similar setup when taking Eurostar from London. You clear customs at the departure and then are free to get off any any station without further immigration proceedings.

    It’s the first such setup for Hong Kong, hence the added panic.

    Reply
  10. Hong Kong is part of China, and it isn’t. Part of the agreement for the handover was that Hong Kong residents would have certain rights that are not available to mainland Chinese. One reason why this train is controversial is that mainland Chinese seek to impose their rules with it in Hong Kong.

    Reply
  11. Hong Kong is part of China and it isn’t. Part of the agreement for the handover was that Hong Kong residents would have certain rights that are not available to mainland Chinese. One reason why this train is controversial is that mainland Chinese seek to impose their rules with it in Hong Kong.

    Reply
  12. Hong Kong is part of China, and it isn’t. Part of the agreement for the handover was that Hong Kong residents would have certain rights that are not available to mainland Chinese. One reason why this train is controversial is that mainland Chinese seek to impose their rules with it in Hong Kong.

    Reply
  13. So, according to Google it takes about 2 hours to go from the Shenzhen border of Hong Kong to central Guangzhou. Not counting whatever it takes to get through customs, it’s about 30 minutes from that spot to central Hong Kong. I get that cars aren’t always an option and I have no idea what the lines at customs are like. It’s just, if it doesn’t go faster than a car, why is it called high speed rail? Isn’t it just normal rail? It does look very pretty and streamlined in the picture.

    Reply
  14. So according to Google it takes about 2 hours to go from the Shenzhen border of Hong Kong to central Guangzhou. Not counting whatever it takes to get through customs it’s about 30 minutes from that spot to central Hong Kong. I get that cars aren’t always an option and I have no idea what the lines at customs are like. It’s just if it doesn’t go faster than a car why is it called high speed rail? Isn’t it just normal rail? It does look very pretty and streamlined in the picture.

    Reply
  15. So, according to Google it takes about 2 hours to go from the Shenzhen border of Hong Kong to central Guangzhou. Not counting whatever it takes to get through customs, it’s about 30 minutes from that spot to central Hong Kong.

    I get that cars aren’t always an option and I have no idea what the lines at customs are like. It’s just, if it doesn’t go faster than a car, why is it called high speed rail? Isn’t it just normal rail? It does look very pretty and streamlined in the picture.

    Reply

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