New NASA Prize for Venus Rover

NASA is continuing its use of prizes and challenges to more rapidly advance technology.

They have a new prize to enable a key part of a Venus rover. This will be first of several challenges and prizes for the Venus rover.

40 thoughts on “New NASA Prize for Venus Rover”

  1. A couple months is a very short time to build a camera and the prize they are offering is not that great, especially given the cost of equipment.

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  2. A couple months is a very short time to build a camera and the prize they are offering is not that great especially given the cost of equipment.

    Reply
  3. Alternative possibility: someone has already done it, and NASA wants to be able to pay them for it without all the rigmarole of doing formal contract process.

    Reply
  4. Alternative possibility: someone has already done it and NASA wants to be able to pay them for it without all the rigmarole of doing formal contract process.

    Reply
  5. Venus should be seeded with genetic engineered bacteria that’ll filter out co2 from the atmosphere and lock them in minerals (eg: limestone). (alternativeely: replicating nanites)

    Reply
  6. Venus should be seeded with genetic engineered bacteria that’ll filter out co2 from the atmosphere and lock them in minerals (eg: limestone). (alternativeely: replicating nanites)

    Reply
  7. Perhaps. Though a completely CO2 atmosphere wouldn’t be a problem to bacteria that feed on it. (Not that it’s true, if memory serves it has around the same amount of nitrogen as earth. You just need to get rid of all the CO2. 🙂 )

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  8. I don’t think any bacteria would survive venus – even extremophiles. just way too hot and dense. 90 atmospheres pressure at surface 470 degrees C, completely CO2 atmosphere, (with clouds of sulphuric acid to boot)

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  9. Perhaps. Though a completely CO2 atmosphere wouldn’t be a problem to bacteria that feed on it.(Not that it’s true if memory serves it has around the same amount of nitrogen as earth. You just need to get rid of all the CO2. 🙂 )

    Reply
  10. I don’t think any bacteria would survive venus – even extremophiles. just way too hot and dense. 90 atmospheres pressure at surface 470 degrees C completely CO2 atmosphere (with clouds of sulphuric acid to boot)

    Reply
  11. Perhaps, though the way I see it it has one less unsolvable problems to human colonization than mars. (Which also doesn’t have any useful quantities of water)

    Reply
  12. Perhaps though the way I see it it has one less unsolvable problems to human colonization than mars. (Which also doesn’t have any useful quantities of water)

    Reply
  13. Methanopyrus kandleri is the hottest replicating organism know, at 122 Celsius. The surface temp of Venus is 88% HOTTER than that and is above the pyrolysis temp for many important organic compounds.

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  14. Methanopyrus kandleri is the hottest replicating organism know at 122 Celsius. The surface temp of Venus is 88{22800fc54956079738b58e74e4dcd846757aa319aad70fcf90c97a58f3119a12} HOTTER than that and is above the pyrolysis temp for many important organic compounds.

    Reply
  15. Methanopyrus kandleri is the hottest replicating organism know, at 122 Celsius. The surface temp of Venus is 88% HOTTER than that and is above the pyrolysis temp for many important organic compounds.

    Reply
  16. Methanopyrus kandleri is the hottest replicating organism know at 122 Celsius. The surface temp of Venus is 88{22800fc54956079738b58e74e4dcd846757aa319aad70fcf90c97a58f3119a12} HOTTER than that and is above the pyrolysis temp for many important organic compounds.

    Reply
  17. Methanopyrus kandleri is the hottest replicating organism know, at 122 Celsius.
    The surface temp of Venus is 88% HOTTER than that and is above the pyrolysis temp for many important organic compounds.

    Reply
  18. Perhaps, though the way I see it it has one less unsolvable problems to human colonization than mars. (Which also doesn’t have any useful quantities of water)

    Reply
  19. Perhaps though the way I see it it has one less unsolvable problems to human colonization than mars. (Which also doesn’t have any useful quantities of water)

    Reply
  20. Perhaps, though the way I see it it has one less unsolvable problems to human colonization than mars. (Which also doesn’t have any useful quantities of water)

    Reply
  21. Perhaps. Though a completely CO2 atmosphere wouldn’t be a problem to bacteria that feed on it. (Not that it’s true, if memory serves it has around the same amount of nitrogen as earth. You just need to get rid of all the CO2. 🙂 )

    Reply
  22. Perhaps. Though a completely CO2 atmosphere wouldn’t be a problem to bacteria that feed on it.(Not that it’s true if memory serves it has around the same amount of nitrogen as earth. You just need to get rid of all the CO2. 🙂 )

    Reply
  23. I don’t think any bacteria would survive venus – even extremophiles. just way too hot and dense. 90 atmospheres pressure at surface 470 degrees C, completely CO2 atmosphere, (with clouds of sulphuric acid to boot)

    Reply
  24. I don’t think any bacteria would survive venus – even extremophiles. just way too hot and dense. 90 atmospheres pressure at surface 470 degrees C completely CO2 atmosphere (with clouds of sulphuric acid to boot)

    Reply
  25. Venus should be seeded with genetic engineered bacteria that’ll filter out co2 from the atmosphere and lock them in minerals (eg: limestone). (alternativeely: replicating nanites)

    Reply
  26. Venus should be seeded with genetic engineered bacteria that’ll filter out co2 from the atmosphere and lock them in minerals (eg: limestone). (alternativeely: replicating nanites)

    Reply
  27. Perhaps. Though a completely CO2 atmosphere wouldn’t be a problem to bacteria that feed on it.
    (Not that it’s true, if memory serves it has around the same amount of nitrogen as earth. You just need to get rid of all the CO2. 🙂 )

    Reply
  28. I don’t think any bacteria would survive venus – even extremophiles. just way too hot and dense. 90 atmospheres pressure at surface 470 degrees C, completely CO2 atmosphere, (with clouds of sulphuric acid to boot)

    Reply
  29. Alternative possibility: someone has already done it, and NASA wants to be able to pay them for it without all the rigmarole of doing formal contract process.

    Reply
  30. Alternative possibility: someone has already done it and NASA wants to be able to pay them for it without all the rigmarole of doing formal contract process.

    Reply
  31. Venus should be seeded with genetic engineered bacteria that’ll filter out co2 from the atmosphere and lock them in minerals (eg: limestone). (alternativeely: replicating nanites)

    Reply
  32. A couple months is a very short time to build a camera and the prize they are offering is not that great, especially given the cost of equipment.

    Reply
  33. A couple months is a very short time to build a camera and the prize they are offering is not that great especially given the cost of equipment.

    Reply

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