Nick Oberg illustration of the SpaceX BFR

Nick Oberg created a cutaway illustration of the SpaceX BFR.

180 thoughts on “Nick Oberg illustration of the SpaceX BFR”

  1. Why do you live in this Make-Believe-World that the military buys stuff according to your logic? You’re the one smoking stuff stronger than Musk.

    Reply
  2. Why do you live in this Make-Believe-World that the military buys stuff according to your logic?You’re the one smoking stuff stronger than Musk.

    Reply
  3. Elon Musk said on his Reddit “Ask Me Anything” session 1 month after the 2017 IAC presentation that they changed the BFR ship’s engine configuration to 4 Raptor-Vac’s and 3 Raptor-SL’s. The extra Raptor SL was added for safety redundancy.

    Reply
  4. Elon Musk said on his Reddit Ask Me Anything”” session 1 month after the 2017 IAC presentation that they changed the BFR ship’s engine configuration to 4 Raptor-Vac’s and 3 Raptor-SL’s. The extra Raptor SL was added for safety redundancy.”””

    Reply
  5. Why would the Air Force go with obsolete hardware vendors? Especially when there is superior and much cheaper technology available? That block buy by ULA a few years ago was their last hurrah and they rushed it through because the knew it was their last big deal. And if the BFR really happens, the Space Force will be all over that. A truly reusable spaceship that can be manned like a submarine in space for months at a time. What’s ULA’s answer to that? Vulcan, the paper rocket that doesn’t even have a chosen engine vendor yet? SLS is total pork and corporate welfare for former shuttle vendors. totally expendable and will launch capsules if it isn’t cancelled first. You’re smoking stuff that’s stronger than what Musk does.

    Reply
  6. Why would the Air Force go with obsolete hardware vendors? Especially when there is superior and much cheaper technology available? That block buy by ULA a few years ago was their last hurrah and they rushed it through because the knew it was their last big deal.And if the BFR really happens the Space Force will be all over that. A truly reusable spaceship that can be manned like a submarine in space for months at a time. What’s ULA’s answer to that? Vulcan the paper rocket that doesn’t even have a chosen engine vendor yet? SLS is total pork and corporate welfare for former shuttle vendors. totally expendable and will launch capsules if it isn’t cancelled first.You’re smoking stuff that’s stronger than what Musk does.

    Reply
  7. This was spam the first two times you posted it. The only thing any investigation will show is that the USAF likes the factor of 17 improvement on the cost of space access SpaceX has produced so far, and they will stick with it. And no, there is no chance the USgov will stick with the SLS–it is prohibitively expensive.

    Reply
  8. This was spam the first two times you posted it.The only thing any investigation will show is that the USAF likes the factor of 17 improvement on the cost of space access SpaceX has produced so far and they will stick with it.And no there is no chance the USgov will stick with the SLS–it is prohibitively expensive.

    Reply
  9. Given this is an American company, it’s safe to assume they will cater to the American public expectations. People from other cultures and nations can adapt to those requirements given they go above and beyond what they could accept, as it has happened with many other products first developed in the USA.

    Reply
  10. Given this is an American company it’s safe to assume they will cater to the American public expectations.People from other cultures and nations can adapt to those requirements given they go above and beyond what they could accept as it has happened with many other products first developed in the USA.

    Reply
  11. The shower shyness may be a peculiarity of US culture. In parts of asia and europe, public baths are pretty common. Just set separate hours for men/women, and you’re good to go.

    Reply
  12. The shower shyness may be a peculiarity of US culture. In parts of asia and europe public baths are pretty common. Just set separate hours for men/women and you’re good to go.

    Reply
  13. Your spam wasn’t any better the second time you posted it. And so what if they did have any kind of investigation? They’ll conclude a factor of over 17 drop in launch costs is good, and stick with SpaceX all the more.

    Reply
  14. Your spam wasn’t any better the second time you posted it.And so what if they did have any kind of investigation? They’ll conclude a factor of over 17 drop in launch costs is good and stick with SpaceX all the more.

    Reply
  15. The center unit becomes a communications/resource identification satellite on arrival, I assume. The tethers get retracted and stowed, you’ve always got use for some rope.

    Reply
  16. The center unit becomes a communications/resource identification satellite on arrival I assume. The tethers get retracted and stowed you’ve always got use for some rope.

    Reply
  17. Too bad Musk is endangering SpaceX’s relationship with the USAF. Air Force Concerned About Elon Musk Smoking Weed SpaceX and Telsa owner Elon Musk has once again stunned the media a few days ago while on Joe Rogan’s latest podcast, causing further concerns of his ability to manage these two companies. Shortly after this podcast, Telsa’s stock went tumbling down. Unfortunately for the U.S. air-force this spectacle may force them to launch an official investigation into their relationship with SpaceX. bit.ly/2oWiW5y Gives them the perfect excuse to go with ULA/SLS…even though it costs the taxpayer MORE money. But then again, that was always the game plan. Musk Fluffers: Grow A Brain

    Reply
  18. Too bad Musk is endangering SpaceX’s relationship with the USAF. Air Force Concerned About Elon Musk Smoking WeedSpaceX and Telsa owner Elon Musk has once again stunned the media a few days ago while on Joe Rogan’s latest podcast causing further concerns of his ability to manage these two companies. Shortly after this podcast Telsa’s stock went tumbling down.Unfortunately for the U.S. air-force this spectacle may force them to launch an official investigation into their relationship with SpaceX.bit.ly/2oWiW5yGives them the perfect excuse to go with ULA/SLS…even though it costs the taxpayer MORE money. But then again that was always the game plan.Musk Fluffers: Grow A Brain”

    Reply
  19. Too bad Musk is endangering SpaceX’s relationship with the USAF. Air Force Concerned About Elon Musk Smoking Weed SpaceX and Telsa owner Elon Musk has once again stunned the media a few days ago while on Joe Rogan’s latest podcast, causing further concerns of his ability to manage these two companies. Shortly after this podcast, Telsa’s stock went tumbling down. Unfortunately for the U.S. air-force this spectacle may force them to launch an official investigation into their relationship with SpaceX. bit.ly/2oWiW5y Gives them the perfect excuse to go with ULA/SLS…even though it costs the taxpayer MORE money. But then again, that was always the game plan. Musk Fluffers: Grow A Brain

    Reply
  20. Too bad Musk is endangering SpaceX’s relationship with the USAF. Air Force Concerned About Elon Musk Smoking WeedSpaceX and Telsa owner Elon Musk has once again stunned the media a few days ago while on Joe Rogan’s latest podcast causing further concerns of his ability to manage these two companies. Shortly after this podcast Telsa’s stock went tumbling down.Unfortunately for the U.S. air-force this spectacle may force them to launch an official investigation into their relationship with SpaceX.bit.ly/2oWiW5yGives them the perfect excuse to go with ULA/SLS…even though it costs the taxpayer MORE money. But then again that was always the game plan.Musk Fluffers: Grow A Brain”

    Reply
  21. Interesting idea. Having some attachment points in the base of the BFS or some kind of “cradles” for the rockets’ base would make this assembly simpler. It would restrict mobility between the BFSs, given the links between them are no more than glorified ropes. In case of requiring to move something or someone between the ships, you stop the spin and then do an EVA. But that would be required for emergencies only. The preferable outcome is not needing it all, with each ship surviving and working autonomously all the trip, and just cooperating with each other to get acceptable gravity and friendly inter-ship gossip. Another points is the need of a central communication array, given the rotating ships will lose track of Earth with their movement. This could probably be solved by omni-directional phased array antennas. Similar to those being developed for Starlink receivers actually. Hm, there’s probably some opportunity for synergy/commonality here.

    Reply
  22. Interesting idea. Having some attachment points in the base of the BFS or some kind of cradles”” for the rockets’ base would make this assembly simpler. It would restrict mobility between the BFSs”” given the links between them are no more than glorified ropes.In case of requiring to move something or someone between the ships you stop the spin and then do an EVA. But that would be required for emergencies only. The preferable outcome is not needing it all with each ship surviving and working autonomously all the trip and just cooperating with each other to get acceptable gravity and friendly inter-ship gossip. Another points is the need of a central communication array given the rotating ships will lose track of Earth with their movement. This could probably be solved by omni-directional phased array antennas.Similar to those being developed for Starlink receivers actually. Hm”” there’s probably some opportunity for synergy/commonality here.”””

    Reply
  23. I don’t think you need a truss, more like a tether. Perhaps several tethers, connected to mounting points near the engines, so that the rest of the structure is properly loaded in compression. Maybe 1km of tether between them. For Martian gravity that would be about 2RPM, probably adaptable. 44m/s, not a horrible expense in terms of delta V to arrive at Mars already adapted to the gravity. Though the BFR is designed to be carried by a crane, I think that’s dependent on it not having a fuel load, I wouldn’t count on the hardpoint being good enough to support it with a significant fuel load.

    Reply
  24. I don’t think you need a truss more like a tether. Perhaps several tethers connected to mounting points near the engines so that the rest of the structure is properly loaded in compression. Maybe 1km of tether between them. For Martian gravity that would be about 2RPM probably adaptable. 44m/s not a horrible expense in terms of delta V to arrive at Mars already adapted to the gravity.Though the BFR is designed to be carried by a crane I think that’s dependent on it not having a fuel load I wouldn’t count on the hardpoint being good enough to support it with a significant fuel load.

    Reply
  25. More spartan facilities are viable for the first explorers only. They will be paid to go and be adventurous explorers and all that. But if they want to send people willing to pay for going, they will need more comfy facilities, even luxurious by regular space travel standards. And privacy + personal space will be specially sought items. The beds probably will be bunk style to save space, but with close-able privacy blinds (a la Japanese capsule hotel), so everyone can have their own space for some hours. Same for the space showers. Shared showers only work if you are in a strongly motivated group where camaraderie and respect are assumed (or strictly enforced), not on a passenger ship full of strangers forced to share a space out of necessity.

    Reply
  26. More spartan facilities are viable for the first explorers only. They will be paid to go and be adventurous explorers and all that.But if they want to send people willing to pay for going they will need more comfy facilities even luxurious by regular space travel standards. And privacy + personal space will be specially sought items.The beds probably will be bunk style to save space but with close-able privacy blinds (a la Japanese capsule hotel) so everyone can have their own space for some hours.Same for the space showers. Shared showers only work if you are in a strongly motivated group where camaraderie and respect are assumed (or strictly enforced) not on a passenger ship full of strangers forced to share a space out of necessity.

    Reply
  27. Two of these oriented tip to tip, linked together by a truss, two pressurized corridors and a central hub would make a roomy space station or interplanetary ship indeed. The engineering problem isn’t trivial though, given they are not made to be “hanging” from their tip. And the assembly/disassembly procedure would require to be very well defined and included in the rocket’s functionality. I have no idea how much it would cost to make them so, and for designing the required structure to link them and make them spin / de-spin. But it certainly sounds like an interesting exercise for any aspiring space engineers! Going to the outer Solar System will probably require something like this, either using the existing BFRs or a new massive ship built in orbit with them, one that provides gravity, room and shielding for the crew during the long trip to Jupiter or Saturn.

    Reply
  28. Two of these oriented tip to tip linked together by a truss two pressurized corridors and a central hub would make a roomy space station or interplanetary ship indeed.The engineering problem isn’t trivial though given they are not made to be hanging”” from their tip. And the assembly/disassembly procedure would require to be very well defined and included in the rocket’s functionality.I have no idea how much it would cost to make them so”” and for designing the required structure to link them and make them spin / de-spin. But it certainly sounds like an interesting exercise for any aspiring space engineers! Going to the outer Solar System will probably require something like this either using the existing BFRs or a new massive ship built in orbit with them one that provides gravity”” room and shielding for the crew during the long trip to Jupiter or Saturn.”””

    Reply
  29. I wonder if they couldn’t send them in pairs, and produce artificial gravity at Mars standard during the trip, bolo style?

    Reply
  30. I wonder if they couldn’t send them in pairs and produce artificial gravity at Mars standard during the trip bolo style?

    Reply
  31. Just as long as they plumb it right: At Tech you had about half a second to leap out of the shower if somebody flushed a toilet, before the cold water cut off and you got scalded.

    Reply
  32. Just as long as they plumb it right: At Tech you had about half a second to leap out of the shower if somebody flushed a toilet before the cold water cut off and you got scalded.

    Reply
  33. The beds look stern-side to me. Re showers – you never used communal showers in college? It’s probably 4 separate stalls.

    Reply
  34. The beds look stern-side to me. Re showers – you never used communal showers in college? It’s probably 4 separate stalls.

    Reply
  35. Yes, see one obvious issue here, you would want an direct access from the crew compartment to the airlock, probably want an suit up room before it to. As its no its an hatch from the living area to the cargo hold even if you need to open the hatch to get stuff out. They will also need an docking port. but that can be directly from crew compartment.

    Reply
  36. Yes see one obvious issue here you would want an direct access from the crew compartment to the airlock probably want an suit up room before it to. As its no its an hatch from the living area to the cargo hold even if you need to open the hatch to get stuff out. They will also need an docking port. but that can be directly from crew compartment.

    Reply
  37. The diagram says 3 sea level engines, but Musk’s 2017 presentation & PDF showed 2. Wikipedia says 3. I’m sure this is a detail that could easily change, but if it is 2, it’d be nice to update Wikipedia…

    Reply
  38. The diagram says 3 sea level engines but Musk’s 2017 presentation & PDF showed 2. Wikipedia says 3. I’m sure this is a detail that could easily change but if it is 2 it’d be nice to update Wikipedia…

    Reply
  39. One detail I think they guessed wrong on is the orientation of the bed – that’d probably be on the stern-ward wall, as the ship will be used as a residence while standing on its tail on Mars. Besides, the bed could serve as noise damper between each ‘stateroom’. Padding could probably be set on either side wall while in freefall. It also that would give a lot more headroom. If there’s some idea that people will double up in those tiny quarters, they could put beds on opposite ends – when they get to Mars they’d have to hot-bunk or possibly it could be set up bunk bed style. Or just spoon… Speaking of spooning – that shower is supposed to serve 4 people at a time? I guess if they know each other REALLY well… And I wouldn’t want the bunk just ‘under’ the shower – noisy and what if it springs a leak?

    Reply
  40. One detail I think they guessed wrong on is the orientation of the bed – that’d probably be on the stern-ward wall as the ship will be used as a residence while standing on its tail on Mars. Besides the bed could serve as noise damper between each ‘stateroom’. Padding could probably be set on either side wall while in freefall. It also that would give a lot more headroom. If there’s some idea that people will double up in those tiny quarters they could put beds on opposite ends – when they get to Mars they’d have to hot-bunk or possibly it could be set up bunk bed style. Or just spoon… Speaking of spooning – that shower is supposed to serve 4 people at a time? I guess if they know each other REALLY well… And I wouldn’t want the bunk just ‘under’ the shower – noisy and what if it springs a leak?

    Reply
  41. The radio dish for communicating with Earth is in the nose facing forwards. So we get the counterintuitive (but in reality perfectly OK) result that the ship has to fly “backwards” with the nose pointing towards Earth as it travels to Mars. Hence, “get your arse to Mars”.

    Reply
  42. The radio dish for communicating with Earth is in the nose facing forwards. So we get the counterintuitive (but in reality perfectly OK) result that the ship has to fly backwards”” with the nose pointing towards Earth as it travels to Mars.Hence”””” “”””get your arse to Mars””””.”””

    Reply
  43. Right-click on the image and choose “open image in a new tab (chrome browser), then go to the tab with the image and you should get the little magnifying glass cursor- click and it get’s pretty big.

    Reply
  44. Right-click on the image and choose open image in a new tab (chrome browser)” then go to the tab with the image and you should get the little magnifying glass cursor- click and it get’s pretty big.”

    Reply
  45. I think it’s understood that this is a depiction of the crewed BFS, and that even such a crewed vehicle would still have a section for cargo onboard.

    Reply
  46. I think it’s understood that this is a depiction of the crewed BFS and that even such a crewed vehicle would still have a section for cargo onboard.

    Reply
  47. The interior layout of the spaces corresponds more or less to those of the official SpaceX presentations and promos. It’s missing the expected dual use central handrail/ladders to allow people to move inside in 0 G and once the ship is landed. The lab equipment and its purpose are speculation, but I guess a manned one would look pretty similar to this. With probably less cabins used for people and more by hardware and supplies. Even if they are expecting to have cargo and supplies waiting for them on Mars, you need to make sure you can survive in your ship enough time on your own in case anything goes wrong and you can’t reach those supplies. Lavatories will certainly be there, probably several given the stated goal of sending tens, maybe hundreds of travelers per trip, but the actual look of them is yet to be known. It’s safe to say they will be similar to those of the shuttle and ISS, probably a bit more comfy.

    Reply
  48. The interior layout of the spaces corresponds more or less to those of the official SpaceX presentations and promos. It’s missing the expected dual use central handrail/ladders to allow people to move inside in 0 G and once the ship is landed.The lab equipment and its purpose are speculation but I guess a manned one would look pretty similar to this. With probably less cabins used for people and more by hardware and supplies.Even if they are expecting to have cargo and supplies waiting for them on Mars you need to make sure you can survive in your ship enough time on your own in case anything goes wrong and you can’t reach those supplies.Lavatories will certainly be there probably several given the stated goal of sending tens maybe hundreds of travelers per trip but the actual look of them is yet to be known. It’s safe to say they will be similar to those of the shuttle and ISS probably a bit more comfy.

    Reply
  49. It would be great if I could enlarge the image to read the text. Unfortunately I cannot so it is just an interesting picture.

    Reply
  50. Elon Musk said on his Reddit “Ask Me Anything” session 1 month after the 2017 IAC presentation that they changed the BFR ship’s engine configuration to 4 Raptor-Vac’s and 3 Raptor-SL’s. The extra Raptor SL was added for safety redundancy.

    Reply
  51. Elon Musk said on his Reddit Ask Me Anything”” session 1 month after the 2017 IAC presentation that they changed the BFR ship’s engine configuration to 4 Raptor-Vac’s and 3 Raptor-SL’s. The extra Raptor SL was added for safety redundancy.”””

    Reply
  52. Elon Musk said on his Reddit “Ask Me Anything” session 1 month after the 2017 IAC presentation that they changed the BFR ship’s engine configuration to 4 Raptor-Vac’s and 3 Raptor-SL’s. The extra Raptor SL was added for safety redundancy.

    Reply
  53. Why do you live in this Make-Believe-World that the military buys stuff according to your logic? You’re the one smoking stuff stronger than Musk.

    Reply
  54. Why do you live in this Make-Believe-World that the military buys stuff according to your logic?You’re the one smoking stuff stronger than Musk.

    Reply
  55. Why would the Air Force go with obsolete hardware vendors? Especially when there is superior and much cheaper technology available? That block buy by ULA a few years ago was their last hurrah and they rushed it through because the knew it was their last big deal. And if the BFR really happens, the Space Force will be all over that. A truly reusable spaceship that can be manned like a submarine in space for months at a time. What’s ULA’s answer to that? Vulcan, the paper rocket that doesn’t even have a chosen engine vendor yet? SLS is total pork and corporate welfare for former shuttle vendors. totally expendable and will launch capsules if it isn’t cancelled first. You’re smoking stuff that’s stronger than what Musk does.

    Reply
  56. Why would the Air Force go with obsolete hardware vendors? Especially when there is superior and much cheaper technology available? That block buy by ULA a few years ago was their last hurrah and they rushed it through because the knew it was their last big deal.And if the BFR really happens the Space Force will be all over that. A truly reusable spaceship that can be manned like a submarine in space for months at a time. What’s ULA’s answer to that? Vulcan the paper rocket that doesn’t even have a chosen engine vendor yet? SLS is total pork and corporate welfare for former shuttle vendors. totally expendable and will launch capsules if it isn’t cancelled first.You’re smoking stuff that’s stronger than what Musk does.

    Reply
  57. This was spam the first two times you posted it. The only thing any investigation will show is that the USAF likes the factor of 17 improvement on the cost of space access SpaceX has produced so far, and they will stick with it. And no, there is no chance the USgov will stick with the SLS–it is prohibitively expensive.

    Reply
  58. This was spam the first two times you posted it.The only thing any investigation will show is that the USAF likes the factor of 17 improvement on the cost of space access SpaceX has produced so far and they will stick with it.And no there is no chance the USgov will stick with the SLS–it is prohibitively expensive.

    Reply
  59. Given this is an American company, it’s safe to assume they will cater to the American public expectations. People from other cultures and nations can adapt to those requirements given they go above and beyond what they could accept, as it has happened with many other products first developed in the USA.

    Reply
  60. Given this is an American company it’s safe to assume they will cater to the American public expectations.People from other cultures and nations can adapt to those requirements given they go above and beyond what they could accept as it has happened with many other products first developed in the USA.

    Reply
  61. The shower shyness may be a peculiarity of US culture. In parts of asia and europe, public baths are pretty common. Just set separate hours for men/women, and you’re good to go.

    Reply
  62. The shower shyness may be a peculiarity of US culture. In parts of asia and europe public baths are pretty common. Just set separate hours for men/women and you’re good to go.

    Reply
  63. Your spam wasn’t any better the second time you posted it. And so what if they did have any kind of investigation? They’ll conclude a factor of over 17 drop in launch costs is good, and stick with SpaceX all the more.

    Reply
  64. Your spam wasn’t any better the second time you posted it.And so what if they did have any kind of investigation? They’ll conclude a factor of over 17 drop in launch costs is good and stick with SpaceX all the more.

    Reply
  65. The center unit becomes a communications/resource identification satellite on arrival, I assume. The tethers get retracted and stowed, you’ve always got use for some rope.

    Reply
  66. The center unit becomes a communications/resource identification satellite on arrival I assume. The tethers get retracted and stowed you’ve always got use for some rope.

    Reply
  67. Too bad Musk is endangering SpaceX’s relationship with the USAF. Air Force Concerned About Elon Musk Smoking Weed SpaceX and Telsa owner Elon Musk has once again stunned the media a few days ago while on Joe Rogan’s latest podcast, causing further concerns of his ability to manage these two companies. Shortly after this podcast, Telsa’s stock went tumbling down. Unfortunately for the U.S. air-force this spectacle may force them to launch an official investigation into their relationship with SpaceX. bit.ly/2oWiW5y Gives them the perfect excuse to go with ULA/SLS…even though it costs the taxpayer MORE money. But then again, that was always the game plan. Musk Fluffers: Grow A Brain

    Reply
  68. Too bad Musk is endangering SpaceX’s relationship with the USAF. Air Force Concerned About Elon Musk Smoking WeedSpaceX and Telsa owner Elon Musk has once again stunned the media a few days ago while on Joe Rogan’s latest podcast causing further concerns of his ability to manage these two companies. Shortly after this podcast Telsa’s stock went tumbling down.Unfortunately for the U.S. air-force this spectacle may force them to launch an official investigation into their relationship with SpaceX.bit.ly/2oWiW5yGives them the perfect excuse to go with ULA/SLS…even though it costs the taxpayer MORE money. But then again that was always the game plan.Musk Fluffers: Grow A Brain”

    Reply
  69. Too bad Musk is endangering SpaceX’s relationship with the USAF. Air Force Concerned About Elon Musk Smoking Weed SpaceX and Telsa owner Elon Musk has once again stunned the media a few days ago while on Joe Rogan’s latest podcast, causing further concerns of his ability to manage these two companies. Shortly after this podcast, Telsa’s stock went tumbling down. Unfortunately for the U.S. air-force this spectacle may force them to launch an official investigation into their relationship with SpaceX. bit.ly/2oWiW5y Gives them the perfect excuse to go with ULA/SLS…even though it costs the taxpayer MORE money. But then again, that was always the game plan. Musk Fluffers: Grow A Brain

    Reply
  70. Too bad Musk is endangering SpaceX’s relationship with the USAF. Air Force Concerned About Elon Musk Smoking WeedSpaceX and Telsa owner Elon Musk has once again stunned the media a few days ago while on Joe Rogan’s latest podcast causing further concerns of his ability to manage these two companies. Shortly after this podcast Telsa’s stock went tumbling down.Unfortunately for the U.S. air-force this spectacle may force them to launch an official investigation into their relationship with SpaceX.bit.ly/2oWiW5yGives them the perfect excuse to go with ULA/SLS…even though it costs the taxpayer MORE money. But then again that was always the game plan.Musk Fluffers: Grow A Brain”

    Reply
  71. Interesting idea. Having some attachment points in the base of the BFS or some kind of “cradles” for the rockets’ base would make this assembly simpler. It would restrict mobility between the BFSs, given the links between them are no more than glorified ropes. In case of requiring to move something or someone between the ships, you stop the spin and then do an EVA. But that would be required for emergencies only. The preferable outcome is not needing it all, with each ship surviving and working autonomously all the trip, and just cooperating with each other to get acceptable gravity and friendly inter-ship gossip. Another points is the need of a central communication array, given the rotating ships will lose track of Earth with their movement. This could probably be solved by omni-directional phased array antennas. Similar to those being developed for Starlink receivers actually. Hm, there’s probably some opportunity for synergy/commonality here.

    Reply
  72. Interesting idea. Having some attachment points in the base of the BFS or some kind of cradles”” for the rockets’ base would make this assembly simpler. It would restrict mobility between the BFSs”” given the links between them are no more than glorified ropes.In case of requiring to move something or someone between the ships you stop the spin and then do an EVA. But that would be required for emergencies only. The preferable outcome is not needing it all with each ship surviving and working autonomously all the trip and just cooperating with each other to get acceptable gravity and friendly inter-ship gossip. Another points is the need of a central communication array given the rotating ships will lose track of Earth with their movement. This could probably be solved by omni-directional phased array antennas.Similar to those being developed for Starlink receivers actually. Hm”” there’s probably some opportunity for synergy/commonality here.”””

    Reply
  73. I don’t think you need a truss, more like a tether. Perhaps several tethers, connected to mounting points near the engines, so that the rest of the structure is properly loaded in compression. Maybe 1km of tether between them. For Martian gravity that would be about 2RPM, probably adaptable. 44m/s, not a horrible expense in terms of delta V to arrive at Mars already adapted to the gravity. Though the BFR is designed to be carried by a crane, I think that’s dependent on it not having a fuel load, I wouldn’t count on the hardpoint being good enough to support it with a significant fuel load.

    Reply
  74. I don’t think you need a truss more like a tether. Perhaps several tethers connected to mounting points near the engines so that the rest of the structure is properly loaded in compression. Maybe 1km of tether between them. For Martian gravity that would be about 2RPM probably adaptable. 44m/s not a horrible expense in terms of delta V to arrive at Mars already adapted to the gravity.Though the BFR is designed to be carried by a crane I think that’s dependent on it not having a fuel load I wouldn’t count on the hardpoint being good enough to support it with a significant fuel load.

    Reply
  75. More spartan facilities are viable for the first explorers only. They will be paid to go and be adventurous explorers and all that. But if they want to send people willing to pay for going, they will need more comfy facilities, even luxurious by regular space travel standards. And privacy + personal space will be specially sought items. The beds probably will be bunk style to save space, but with close-able privacy blinds (a la Japanese capsule hotel), so everyone can have their own space for some hours. Same for the space showers. Shared showers only work if you are in a strongly motivated group where camaraderie and respect are assumed (or strictly enforced), not on a passenger ship full of strangers forced to share a space out of necessity.

    Reply
  76. More spartan facilities are viable for the first explorers only. They will be paid to go and be adventurous explorers and all that.But if they want to send people willing to pay for going they will need more comfy facilities even luxurious by regular space travel standards. And privacy + personal space will be specially sought items.The beds probably will be bunk style to save space but with close-able privacy blinds (a la Japanese capsule hotel) so everyone can have their own space for some hours.Same for the space showers. Shared showers only work if you are in a strongly motivated group where camaraderie and respect are assumed (or strictly enforced) not on a passenger ship full of strangers forced to share a space out of necessity.

    Reply
  77. Two of these oriented tip to tip, linked together by a truss, two pressurized corridors and a central hub would make a roomy space station or interplanetary ship indeed. The engineering problem isn’t trivial though, given they are not made to be “hanging” from their tip. And the assembly/disassembly procedure would require to be very well defined and included in the rocket’s functionality. I have no idea how much it would cost to make them so, and for designing the required structure to link them and make them spin / de-spin. But it certainly sounds like an interesting exercise for any aspiring space engineers! Going to the outer Solar System will probably require something like this, either using the existing BFRs or a new massive ship built in orbit with them, one that provides gravity, room and shielding for the crew during the long trip to Jupiter or Saturn.

    Reply
  78. Two of these oriented tip to tip linked together by a truss two pressurized corridors and a central hub would make a roomy space station or interplanetary ship indeed.The engineering problem isn’t trivial though given they are not made to be hanging”” from their tip. And the assembly/disassembly procedure would require to be very well defined and included in the rocket’s functionality.I have no idea how much it would cost to make them so”” and for designing the required structure to link them and make them spin / de-spin. But it certainly sounds like an interesting exercise for any aspiring space engineers! Going to the outer Solar System will probably require something like this either using the existing BFRs or a new massive ship built in orbit with them one that provides gravity”” room and shielding for the crew during the long trip to Jupiter or Saturn.”””

    Reply
  79. Just as long as they plumb it right: At Tech you had about half a second to leap out of the shower if somebody flushed a toilet, before the cold water cut off and you got scalded.

    Reply
  80. Just as long as they plumb it right: At Tech you had about half a second to leap out of the shower if somebody flushed a toilet before the cold water cut off and you got scalded.

    Reply
  81. Why would the Air Force go with obsolete hardware vendors? Especially when there is superior and much cheaper technology available? That block buy by ULA a few years ago was their last hurrah and they rushed it through because the knew it was their last big deal.

    And if the BFR really happens, the Space Force will be all over that. A truly reusable spaceship that can be manned like a submarine in space for months at a time. What’s ULA’s answer to that? Vulcan, the paper rocket that doesn’t even have a chosen engine vendor yet?

    SLS is total pork and corporate welfare for former shuttle vendors. totally expendable and will launch capsules if it isn’t cancelled first.

    You’re smoking stuff that’s stronger than what Musk does.

    Reply
  82. Yes, see one obvious issue here, you would want an direct access from the crew compartment to the airlock, probably want an suit up room before it to. As its no its an hatch from the living area to the cargo hold even if you need to open the hatch to get stuff out. They will also need an docking port. but that can be directly from crew compartment.

    Reply
  83. Yes see one obvious issue here you would want an direct access from the crew compartment to the airlock probably want an suit up room before it to. As its no its an hatch from the living area to the cargo hold even if you need to open the hatch to get stuff out. They will also need an docking port. but that can be directly from crew compartment.

    Reply
  84. The diagram says 3 sea level engines, but Musk’s 2017 presentation & PDF showed 2. Wikipedia says 3. I’m sure this is a detail that could easily change, but if it is 2, it’d be nice to update Wikipedia…

    Reply
  85. The diagram says 3 sea level engines but Musk’s 2017 presentation & PDF showed 2. Wikipedia says 3. I’m sure this is a detail that could easily change but if it is 2 it’d be nice to update Wikipedia…

    Reply
  86. This was spam the first two times you posted it.

    The only thing any investigation will show is that the USAF likes the factor of 17 improvement on the cost of space access SpaceX has produced so far, and they will stick with it.

    And no, there is no chance the USgov will stick with the SLS–it is prohibitively expensive.

    Reply
  87. Given this is an American company, it’s safe to assume they will cater to the American public expectations.

    People from other cultures and nations can adapt to those requirements given they go above and beyond what they could accept, as it has happened with many other products first developed in the USA.

    Reply
  88. One detail I think they guessed wrong on is the orientation of the bed – that’d probably be on the stern-ward wall, as the ship will be used as a residence while standing on its tail on Mars. Besides, the bed could serve as noise damper between each ‘stateroom’. Padding could probably be set on either side wall while in freefall. It also that would give a lot more headroom. If there’s some idea that people will double up in those tiny quarters, they could put beds on opposite ends – when they get to Mars they’d have to hot-bunk or possibly it could be set up bunk bed style. Or just spoon… Speaking of spooning – that shower is supposed to serve 4 people at a time? I guess if they know each other REALLY well… And I wouldn’t want the bunk just ‘under’ the shower – noisy and what if it springs a leak?

    Reply
  89. One detail I think they guessed wrong on is the orientation of the bed – that’d probably be on the stern-ward wall as the ship will be used as a residence while standing on its tail on Mars. Besides the bed could serve as noise damper between each ‘stateroom’. Padding could probably be set on either side wall while in freefall. It also that would give a lot more headroom. If there’s some idea that people will double up in those tiny quarters they could put beds on opposite ends – when they get to Mars they’d have to hot-bunk or possibly it could be set up bunk bed style. Or just spoon… Speaking of spooning – that shower is supposed to serve 4 people at a time? I guess if they know each other REALLY well… And I wouldn’t want the bunk just ‘under’ the shower – noisy and what if it springs a leak?

    Reply
  90. The shower shyness may be a peculiarity of US culture. In parts of asia and europe, public baths are pretty common. Just set separate hours for men/women, and you’re good to go.

    Reply
  91. Your spam wasn’t any better the second time you posted it.

    And so what if they did have any kind of investigation? They’ll conclude a factor of over 17 drop in launch costs is good, and stick with SpaceX all the more.

    Reply
  92. Too bad Musk is endangering SpaceX’s relationship with the USAF.

    Air Force Concerned About Elon Musk Smoking Weed

    SpaceX and Telsa owner Elon Musk has once again stunned the media a few days ago while on Joe Rogan’s latest podcast, causing further concerns of his ability to manage these two companies. Shortly after this podcast, Telsa’s stock went tumbling down.

    Unfortunately for the U.S. air-force this spectacle may force them to launch an official investigation into their relationship with SpaceX.

    bit.ly/2oWiW5y

    Gives them the perfect excuse to go with ULA/SLS…even though it costs the taxpayer MORE money. But then again, that was always the game plan.

    Musk Fluffers: Grow A Brain

    Reply
  93. Too bad Musk is endangering SpaceX’s relationship with the USAF.

    Air Force Concerned About Elon Musk Smoking Weed

    SpaceX and Telsa owner Elon Musk has once again stunned the media a few days ago while on Joe Rogan’s latest podcast, causing further concerns of his ability to manage these two companies. Shortly after this podcast, Telsa’s stock went tumbling down.

    Unfortunately for the U.S. air-force this spectacle may force them to launch an official investigation into their relationship with SpaceX.

    bit.ly/2oWiW5y

    Gives them the perfect excuse to go with ULA/SLS…even though it costs the taxpayer MORE money. But then again, that was always the game plan.

    Musk Fluffers: Grow A Brain

    Reply
  94. Interesting idea. Having some attachment points in the base of the BFS or some kind of “cradles” for the rockets’ base would make this assembly simpler. It would restrict mobility between the BFSs, given the links between them are no more than glorified ropes.

    In case of requiring to move something or someone between the ships, you stop the spin and then do an EVA. But that would be required for emergencies only. The preferable outcome is not needing it all, with each ship surviving and working autonomously all the trip, and just cooperating with each other to get acceptable gravity and friendly inter-ship gossip.

    Another points is the need of a central communication array, given the rotating ships will lose track of Earth with their movement. This could probably be solved by omni-directional phased array antennas.

    Similar to those being developed for Starlink receivers actually. Hm, there’s probably some opportunity for synergy/commonality here.

    Reply
  95. I don’t think you need a truss, more like a tether. Perhaps several tethers, connected to mounting points near the engines, so that the rest of the structure is properly loaded in compression. Maybe 1km of tether between them. For Martian gravity that would be about 2RPM, probably adaptable. 44m/s, not a horrible expense in terms of delta V to arrive at Mars already adapted to the gravity.

    Though the BFR is designed to be carried by a crane, I think that’s dependent on it not having a fuel load, I wouldn’t count on the hardpoint being good enough to support it with a significant fuel load.

    Reply
  96. More spartan facilities are viable for the first explorers only. They will be paid to go and be adventurous explorers and all that.

    But if they want to send people willing to pay for going, they will need more comfy facilities, even luxurious by regular space travel standards. And privacy + personal space will be specially sought items.

    The beds probably will be bunk style to save space, but with close-able privacy blinds (a la Japanese capsule hotel), so everyone can have their own space for some hours.

    Same for the space showers. Shared showers only work if you are in a strongly motivated group where camaraderie and respect are assumed (or strictly enforced), not on a passenger ship full of strangers forced to share a space out of necessity.

    Reply
  97. Two of these oriented tip to tip, linked together by a truss, two pressurized corridors and a central hub would make a roomy space station or interplanetary ship indeed.

    The engineering problem isn’t trivial though, given they are not made to be “hanging” from their tip. And the assembly/disassembly procedure would require to be very well defined and included in the rocket’s functionality.

    I have no idea how much it would cost to make them so, and for designing the required structure to link them and make them spin / de-spin.

    But it certainly sounds like an interesting exercise for any aspiring space engineers!

    Going to the outer Solar System will probably require something like this, either using the existing BFRs or a new massive ship built in orbit with them, one that provides gravity, room and shielding for the crew during the long trip to Jupiter or Saturn.

    Reply
  98. The radio dish for communicating with Earth is in the nose facing forwards. So we get the counterintuitive (but in reality perfectly OK) result that the ship has to fly “backwards” with the nose pointing towards Earth as it travels to Mars. Hence, “get your arse to Mars”.

    Reply
  99. The radio dish for communicating with Earth is in the nose facing forwards. So we get the counterintuitive (but in reality perfectly OK) result that the ship has to fly backwards”” with the nose pointing towards Earth as it travels to Mars.Hence”””” “”””get your arse to Mars””””.”””

    Reply
  100. Right-click on the image and choose “open image in a new tab (chrome browser), then go to the tab with the image and you should get the little magnifying glass cursor- click and it get’s pretty big.

    Reply
  101. Right-click on the image and choose open image in a new tab (chrome browser)” then go to the tab with the image and you should get the little magnifying glass cursor- click and it get’s pretty big.”

    Reply
  102. I think it’s understood that this is a depiction of the crewed BFS, and that even such a crewed vehicle would still have a section for cargo onboard.

    Reply
  103. I think it’s understood that this is a depiction of the crewed BFS and that even such a crewed vehicle would still have a section for cargo onboard.

    Reply
  104. Yes, see one obvious issue here, you would want an direct access from the crew compartment to the airlock, probably want an suit up room before it to.
    As its no its an hatch from the living area to the cargo hold even if you need to open the hatch to get stuff out.
    They will also need an docking port. but that can be directly from crew compartment.

    Reply
  105. The diagram says 3 sea level engines, but Musk’s 2017 presentation & PDF showed 2. Wikipedia says 3.
    I’m sure this is a detail that could easily change, but if it is 2, it’d be nice to update Wikipedia…

    Reply
  106. One detail I think they guessed wrong on is the orientation of the bed – that’d probably be on the stern-ward wall, as the ship will be used as a residence while standing on its tail on Mars. Besides, the bed could serve as noise damper between each ‘stateroom’. Padding could probably be set on either side wall while in freefall. It also that would give a lot more headroom.

    If there’s some idea that people will double up in those tiny quarters, they could put beds on opposite ends – when they get to Mars they’d have to hot-bunk or possibly it could be set up bunk bed style. Or just spoon… Speaking of spooning – that shower is supposed to serve 4 people at a time? I guess if they know each other REALLY well… And I wouldn’t want the bunk just ‘under’ the shower – noisy and what if it springs a leak?

    Reply
  107. The interior layout of the spaces corresponds more or less to those of the official SpaceX presentations and promos. It’s missing the expected dual use central handrail/ladders to allow people to move inside in 0 G and once the ship is landed. The lab equipment and its purpose are speculation, but I guess a manned one would look pretty similar to this. With probably less cabins used for people and more by hardware and supplies. Even if they are expecting to have cargo and supplies waiting for them on Mars, you need to make sure you can survive in your ship enough time on your own in case anything goes wrong and you can’t reach those supplies. Lavatories will certainly be there, probably several given the stated goal of sending tens, maybe hundreds of travelers per trip, but the actual look of them is yet to be known. It’s safe to say they will be similar to those of the shuttle and ISS, probably a bit more comfy.

    Reply
  108. The interior layout of the spaces corresponds more or less to those of the official SpaceX presentations and promos. It’s missing the expected dual use central handrail/ladders to allow people to move inside in 0 G and once the ship is landed.The lab equipment and its purpose are speculation but I guess a manned one would look pretty similar to this. With probably less cabins used for people and more by hardware and supplies.Even if they are expecting to have cargo and supplies waiting for them on Mars you need to make sure you can survive in your ship enough time on your own in case anything goes wrong and you can’t reach those supplies.Lavatories will certainly be there probably several given the stated goal of sending tens maybe hundreds of travelers per trip but the actual look of them is yet to be known. It’s safe to say they will be similar to those of the shuttle and ISS probably a bit more comfy.

    Reply
  109. The radio dish for communicating with Earth is in the nose facing forwards.
    So we get the counterintuitive (but in reality perfectly OK) result that the ship has to fly “backwards” with the nose pointing towards Earth as it travels to Mars.

    Hence, “get your arse to Mars”.

    Reply
  110. Right-click on the image and choose “open image in a new tab (chrome browser), then go to the tab with the image and you should get the little magnifying glass cursor- click and it get’s pretty big.

    Reply
  111. One correction: presumably, the cargo bays of crew BFS will only carry minimal equipment immediately needed by the crew. The really heavy stuff, including ISRU equipment etc, will be delivered separately in dedicated cargo BFS that lack all the crew accommodations.

    Reply
  112. One correction: presumably the cargo bays of crew BFS will only carry minimal equipment immediately needed by the crew. The really heavy stuff including ISRU equipment etc will be delivered separately in dedicated cargo BFS that lack all the crew accommodations.

    Reply
  113. One correction: presumably, the cargo bays of crew BFS will only carry minimal equipment immediately needed by the crew. The really heavy stuff, including ISRU equipment etc, will be delivered separately in dedicated cargo BFS that lack all the crew accommodations.

    Reply
  114. One correction: presumably the cargo bays of crew BFS will only carry minimal equipment immediately needed by the crew. The really heavy stuff including ISRU equipment etc will be delivered separately in dedicated cargo BFS that lack all the crew accommodations.

    Reply
  115. The interior layout of the spaces corresponds more or less to those of the official SpaceX presentations and promos. It’s missing the expected dual use central handrail/ladders to allow people to move inside in 0 G and once the ship is landed.

    The lab equipment and its purpose are speculation, but I guess a manned one would look pretty similar to this. With probably less cabins used for people and more by hardware and supplies.

    Even if they are expecting to have cargo and supplies waiting for them on Mars, you need to make sure you can survive in your ship enough time on your own in case anything goes wrong and you can’t reach those supplies.

    Lavatories will certainly be there, probably several given the stated goal of sending tens, maybe hundreds of travelers per trip, but the actual look of them is yet to be known. It’s safe to say they will be similar to those of the shuttle and ISS, probably a bit more comfy.

    Reply
  116. One correction: presumably, the cargo bays of crew BFS will only carry minimal equipment immediately needed by the crew. The really heavy stuff, including ISRU equipment etc, will be delivered separately in dedicated cargo BFS that lack all the crew accommodations.

    Reply

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