Using Woolly Mammoths to help solve Climate Change

Returning woolly mammoth to the Tundra would help solve Climate Change.

They lived during the Pleistocene until extinction in the early Holocene epoch, and was one of the last in a line of mammoth species.

The natural environment in the tundra was about 19 million square kilometers throughout Siberia Russia, Canada and Alaska. This huge amount of space used to have many more herbivores than it has now and the hunters and the trees have displaced these animals but they could easily return in particular. The mammoth was very good at knocking down trees they can knock down a tree in about 15 seconds.

They have already returned a number of cold-adapted animals horses, musk ox and the Bison.

There were only a couple of hundred bison in the in the world and now their numbers are back up to half a million worldwide.

What would the impact of woolly mammoths be ?

They will keep the temperature of the ground very low. These animals will stomp on the snow in the winter so the 20 degrees centigrade summer temperatures can equilibrate the minus 40 degree temperature in the wind in the winter but not if you have a big thick insulating layer of snow so these herbivores will do that.

This will help trap a lot of carbon.

30 thoughts on “Using Woolly Mammoths to help solve Climate Change”

  1. OK It’s good to have an excuse to bring back mammoths. But even more important is to have a sound, politically correct reason to bring back Tyrannosaurus Rex. “To help control the plague of Mammoths” is partial credit only.

    Reply
  2. OK It’s good to have an excuse to bring back mammoths. But even more important is to have a sound politically correct reason to bring back Tyrannosaurus Rex.To help control the plague of Mammoths”” is partial credit only.”””

    Reply
  3. Great, I just love this, although the justification is probably bull…. A recent study has shown that just to mitigate the US CO2 emissions from coal plants, would require almost 90% of the US to be covered by (young, growing) forest.

    Reply
  4. Great I just love this although the justification is probably bull….A recent study has shown that just to mitigate the US CO2 emissions from coal plants would require almost 90{22800fc54956079738b58e74e4dcd846757aa319aad70fcf90c97a58f3119a12} of the US to be covered by (young growing) forest.

    Reply
  5. Um, who came up with this idea, and has it been publicly reviewed? We seem to be lacking a lot of details here. What percentage of ground would the snow be “stomped” on? Wouldn’t they get to the grass by brushing the snow to the side, like bison and musk ox do? Are arctic grasslands better at carbon sequestration than arboreal forests? Are there also effects of mammoth that would exacerbate warming? Also, there’s the whole separate issue of reintroducing the mammoth. Despite headlines and click-bait, that remains a difficult task technically, and anything we do in the next 20 years (at least) would be some kind of hybrid between modern elephants and mammoths. In any case, ancient mammoths would likely be missing immune system protection from modern diseases, and that part at least would need to be updated.

    Reply
  6. Um who came up with this idea and has it been publicly reviewed? We seem to be lacking a lot of details here. What percentage of ground would the snow be stomped”” on? Wouldn’t they get to the grass by brushing the snow to the side”” like bison and musk ox do? Are arctic grasslands better at carbon sequestration than arboreal forests? Are there also effects of mammoth that would exacerbate warming?Also there’s the whole separate issue of reintroducing the mammoth. Despite headlines and click-bait that remains a difficult task technically and anything we do in the next 20 years (at least) would be some kind of hybrid between modern elephants and mammoths. In any case ancient mammoths would likely be missing immune system protection from modern diseases”” and that part at least would need to be updated.”””

    Reply
  7. Um, who came up with this idea, and has it been publicly reviewed? We seem to be lacking a lot of details here. What percentage of ground would the snow be “stomped” on? Wouldn’t they get to the grass by brushing the snow to the side, like bison and musk ox do? Are arctic grasslands better at carbon sequestration than arboreal forests? Are there also effects of mammoth that would exacerbate warming? Also, there’s the whole separate issue of reintroducing the mammoth. Despite headlines and click-bait, that remains a difficult task technically, and anything we do in the next 20 years (at least) would be some kind of hybrid between modern elephants and mammoths. In any case, ancient mammoths would likely be missing immune system protection from modern diseases, and that part at least would need to be updated.

    Reply
  8. Um who came up with this idea and has it been publicly reviewed? We seem to be lacking a lot of details here. What percentage of ground would the snow be stomped”” on? Wouldn’t they get to the grass by brushing the snow to the side”” like bison and musk ox do? Are arctic grasslands better at carbon sequestration than arboreal forests? Are there also effects of mammoth that would exacerbate warming?Also there’s the whole separate issue of reintroducing the mammoth. Despite headlines and click-bait that remains a difficult task technically and anything we do in the next 20 years (at least) would be some kind of hybrid between modern elephants and mammoths. In any case ancient mammoths would likely be missing immune system protection from modern diseases”” and that part at least would need to be updated.”””

    Reply
  9. Great, I just love this, although the justification is probably bull…. A recent study has shown that just to mitigate the US CO2 emissions from coal plants, would require almost 90% of the US to be covered by (young, growing) forest.

    Reply
  10. Great I just love this although the justification is probably bull….A recent study has shown that just to mitigate the US CO2 emissions from coal plants would require almost 90{22800fc54956079738b58e74e4dcd846757aa319aad70fcf90c97a58f3119a12} of the US to be covered by (young growing) forest.

    Reply
  11. Um, who came up with this idea, and has it been publicly reviewed? We seem to be lacking a lot of details here. What percentage of ground would the snow be “stomped” on? Wouldn’t they get to the grass by brushing the snow to the side, like bison and musk ox do? Are arctic grasslands better at carbon sequestration than arboreal forests? Are there also effects of mammoth that would exacerbate warming?

    Also, there’s the whole separate issue of reintroducing the mammoth. Despite headlines and click-bait, that remains a difficult task technically, and anything we do in the next 20 years (at least) would be some kind of hybrid between modern elephants and mammoths. In any case, ancient mammoths would likely be missing immune system protection from modern diseases, and that part at least would need to be updated.

    Reply
  12. Great, I just love this, although the justification is probably bull….
    A recent study has shown that just to mitigate the US CO2 emissions from coal plants, would require almost 90% of the US to be covered by (young, growing) forest.

    Reply
  13. OK It’s good to have an excuse to bring back mammoths. But even more important is to have a sound, politically correct reason to bring back Tyrannosaurus Rex. “To help control the plague of Mammoths” is partial credit only.

    Reply
  14. OK It’s good to have an excuse to bring back mammoths. But even more important is to have a sound politically correct reason to bring back Tyrannosaurus Rex.To help control the plague of Mammoths”” is partial credit only.”””

    Reply
  15. OK It’s good to have an excuse to bring back mammoths. But even more important is to have a sound, politically correct reason to bring back Tyrannosaurus Rex.

    “To help control the plague of Mammoths” is partial credit only.

    Reply

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