Get a Room – A Mobile Room

The Radical Innovation Award 2018 was given to the Autonomous Travel Suite.

Autonomous Travel Suite is a hospitality service specifically designed for long-distance travels. It is different from personal commute or leisure cars.

Autonomous Travel Suite is designed to be a room, not a car. It is a room that has the flexibility to customize the usage, scale, furnishings, appliances, and services. You can use the online app to select necessary features individually (like a cradle or tv screen, among others), and it will be delivered to your front door with all your needs.

It can be used like a cruise ship is today. You go about a city for holiday or business and then retire to your suite. The cruise ship leaves and takes you to the next city. The travel suite would be called up like a ride-sharing car. However, you would have WiFi and other services.

Get a Mobile Room

A separate UK study indicates that widespread adoption of self-driving cars will mean mobile prostitution and couples coupling in the cars. This would be even more comfortable and convenient with mobile rooms.

The World Comes to You and You Go to the World

Autonomous Hotel Chain is like a joint operation between a rental car chain and hotel chain. It can be affiliated with regular hotels and businesses.

Drones will be able to make deliveries of food and other products while the suite is moving.

Autonomous Travelers can book any of the nearby facilities (like gym, pool, shower, and parent suites), and these will be charged per usage.

Autonomous Travel Suite is an electric vehicle. The batteries will be maintained by the Autonomous Hotel Facilities, and if you need replacement, the service vehicle will come and exchange your batteries with a new one. No need to wait, just plug in and charge the batteries.

18 thoughts on “Get a Room – A Mobile Room”

  1. A separate UK study indicates that widespread adoption of self-driving cars will mean mobile prostitution and couples coupling in the cars. This would be even more comfortable and convenient with mobile rooms.

    I guess UK teenagers are different than American ones.

    Reply
  2. A room drone could be made even though it is vaporware. It would be very difficult to transport humans in it. Much easyer to use drone for placement and hike to the destination. FAA approval not needed if you fly it within eye sight…I would guess it would cost around 15k to 20k per box for cost of materials. I think it would be a last mile device deployed by a flatbed for hikers in hawaii. 2 cents.

    Reply
  3. Restricted is a very ambiguous word without details.

    If you mean not every RV is capable of travelling over every square foot of public land, true. If you mean they’re not allowed in, wrong.

    It’s called boon-docking.

    If you mean some cities have become unfriendly to over-nighters, even banning them, absolutely.

    That’s because there will always be ̶d̶o̶u̶c̶h̶e̶b̶a̶g̶s̶ emotionally and socially stunted people screwing things up for everybody.

    That’s where stealth comes in. Stealthy vans… you’ve seen them, but had no idea what, or who, was inside.

    I believe the techno-nomadism being distilled in the deserts, mountains and cities of the American SW represents a legitimate social model for how a segment of a future system-drifting population might live.

    Reply
  4. I think those are supposed to be “freight” delivery drones. The “delivery truck” of the future. Yeah, that’s a bit much. Unless the delivery location is remote that kind of delivery seems like over kill and quite wasteful. I guess we could always decide to do away with roads … no, not in the near or medium future.

    Reply
  5. So… “elephant-in-the-living-room” question.

    Apart from the 3D graphics, has a single flying bedroom actually been flown? Did it comport itself more than a few miles? Did it do this autonomously? Did the FAA approve it? Where is the YouTube video? What did it cost to build? How much battery-pack was required? Or was it ICE based?

    Just saying,
    GoatGuy

    Reply
  6. Give me an RV version so I could live in it. It would be great. I could move south for the winter and telecommute. Being a computer nerd I can work from anywhere as long as I have an Internet connection.

    Reply
  7. I talk with friends about wanting to have holidays using an autonomous vehicle for travel and living. It would make for the best holidays.

    Reply
  8. People are already living this kind of mobile life. They are nomads. Living in cars, vans, campers, moving from one national forest to another, one BLM land to another.

    They move with the seasons, working via the web, or as temporary labourers.

    Some are in self described tribes, some moving together in caravans. Some, many, move individually, meeting up in temporary camps that dissolve every two weeks or so.

    If you’ve a mind to, check this out — Cheaprvliving on YT. Mine (dig) deeply.

    My house is paid for, and I’ve no need to do so, but come summer, I plan to go mobile. To spend time at cool elevations, deep in national forests: researching, writing. I’m resto-modding a 10′ vintage camper to that end.

    System wide mobility, at SOME point in the future, is guaranteed. Inevitable. These folk are a living exemplar of how such a mobile society operates and evolves in a technologically dense era.

    And it can be joined, or watched as it happens in real-time on Youtube.

    Reply
  9. A room drone could be made even though it is vaporware. It would be very difficult to transport humans in it. Much easyer to use drone for placement and hike to the destination. FAA approval not needed if you fly it within eye sight…I would guess it would cost around 15k to 20k per box for cost of materials. I think it would be a last mile device deployed by a flatbed for hikers in hawaii. 2 cents.

    Reply
  10. Restricted is a very ambiguous word without details.

    If you mean not every RV is capable of travelling over every square foot of public land, true. If you mean they’re not allowed in, wrong.

    It’s called boon-docking.

    If you mean some cities have become unfriendly to over-nighters, even banning them, absolutely.

    That’s because there will always be ̶d̶o̶u̶c̶h̶e̶b̶a̶g̶s̶ emotionally and socially stunted people screwing things up for everybody.

    That’s where stealth comes in. Stealthy vans… you’ve seen them, but had no idea what, or who, was inside.

    I believe the techno-nomadism being distilled in the deserts, mountains and cities of the American SW represents a legitimate social model for how a segment of a future system-drifting population might live.

    Reply
  11. I think those are supposed to be “freight” delivery drones. The “delivery truck” of the future. Yeah, that’s a bit much. Unless the delivery location is remote that kind of delivery seems like over kill and quite wasteful. I guess we could always decide to do away with roads … no, not in the near or medium future.

    Reply
  12. So… “elephant-in-the-living-room” question.

    Apart from the 3D graphics, has a single flying bedroom actually been flown? Did it comport itself more than a few miles? Did it do this autonomously? Did the FAA approve it? Where is the YouTube video? What did it cost to build? How much battery-pack was required? Or was it ICE based?

    Just saying,
    GoatGuy

    Reply
  13. Give me an RV version so I could live in it. It would be great. I could move south for the winter and telecommute. Being a computer nerd I can work from anywhere as long as I have an Internet connection.

    Reply
  14. People are already living this kind of mobile life. They are nomads. Living in cars, vans, campers, moving from one national forest to another, one BLM land to another.

    They move with the seasons, working via the web, or as temporary labourers.

    Some are in self described tribes, some moving together in caravans. Some, many, move individually, meeting up in temporary camps that dissolve every two weeks or so.

    If you’ve a mind to, check this out — Cheaprvliving on YT. Mine (dig) deeply.

    My house is paid for, and I’ve no need to do so, but come summer, I plan to go mobile. To spend time at cool elevations, deep in national forests: researching, writing. I’m resto-modding a 10′ vintage camper to that end.

    System wide mobility, at SOME point in the future, is guaranteed. Inevitable. These folk are a living exemplar of how such a mobile society operates and evolves in a technologically dense era.

    And it can be joined, or watched as it happens in real-time on Youtube.

    Reply

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