Aging Expert Heading FDA Could be Good for Antiaging Projects

In April, aging research expert Norman E. (Ned) Sharpless, MD will become the acting commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration. Dr. Sharpless is a 2003 Paul B. Beeson Emerging Leaders Career Development Award in Aging scholar. Ned served on AFAR’s National Scientific Advisory Council from 2005-2011 and chaired the Selection Committee of the Glenn/AFAR Postdoctoral Program for Transnational Research on Aging program in 2015 and 2016. For over 30 years, AFAR has supported the science of healthier aging.

Metforming Aging Trial

AFAR has raised $35 million out of a needed $55 million for the Targeting Aging with Metformin Trial. There would still be the need for the NIH (National Institute of Health) to contribute another $40 million for the study. Dr. Nir Barzilai, director of the Institute for Aging Research at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, designed the Targeting Aging with Metformin anti-aging study. Metformin is an antidiabetic drug that was approved by the FDA more than 70 years ago. It is estimated that 120 million people take metformin. It has been shown to extend the lives of nematodes by 57% and mice by 6%. TAME will consist of 3,000 patients between 65 – 79 years old and have a composite primary endpoint of myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, cancer, dementia and death. The trial could detect 22.5% reduced incidences of those diseases.
SOURCES- AFAR, New York Times, FDA, Nature Written By Brian Wang, Nextbigfuture

5 thoughts on “Aging Expert Heading FDA Could be Good for Antiaging Projects”

  1. I do think this guy is a nice departure from Trump’s anti-whatever agency people he chose for just about everything. It is extremely demoralizing to the entire agency have an agency leader who is against the whole concept and role of the agency, or has absolutely no justification for being there.

    I consider the selection of these people to be the most important role of the President. Totally serious. A President can’t do everything he/she has to delegate to get things done. That was the one thing I held out hope for when Trump was elected. He was not really beholding to anyone. He could have selected the very best people for these jobs…but sadly he chose worse than anyone…ever. If he was building a hotel, would he choose the leader of the local NIMBY organization to run the operation?

    If we are to get value rather than waste from government, these agencies need good leadership.

    This guy looks legitimate. Still, I would not really count on him funding the study. Not everyone is onboard with this new angle…even though the science is ready for this. Would be great.

    The math does not really add up in the article. $55m-$35m is $20m…so why do they need another $40 million? Someone need a new Roadster? And why would you need all of it up front? If the whole thing will run $55m, and this will take years, why isn’t $35m enough to get this thing rolling?

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  2. I think my recovery from muscle strain/fatigue is improved. That is probably from the nicotinamide riboside. That is consistent with things some other people have said.

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  3. Been taking the Metformin for a year. Can’t say I really noticed anything. Maybe I am a little less grouchy at times.

    The fasting mimicking though I think is really doing something. And I don’t know if it is just more of the same, but second time around on this fasting mimicking thing now combining the fisetin seems to be clearly making continued progress.

    I plan to do this twice a month for maybe 2-3 months twice a year or until I see very little improvement from doing it. I am assuming there are diminishing returns at some point.

    I think my eyes are working better too.

    I have been taking antioxidants for years. I think they have helped me look younger. But I also never drank or smoked.

    Some things it does not seem to help. I am as absentminded as ever. In fact, I looked at health forums, and no one seems to be anywhere near as absentminded as me. I think it is like that Far Side cartoon…full brain: http://grig3.org/377c6968d3b5e951.html I read enormous numbers of scientific articles. And I took hundreds of college classes. Lots of chess. Lots of music. I was starved for information. Went wild. Love the Internet.

    And even though I feel less fatigue and such when loosing sleep…I still can’t multitask worth a darn when I haven’t had enough sleep.

    Still, have trouble trying to learn to spell words. I go over them over and over, but my brain stubbornly refuses to learn them. Unlearning can be very hard for me. If I have been spelling wrong for years…

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  4. I asked for it when the doc said I was prediabetic because I knew it had a chance to help aging. But I think I was just barely prediabetic. Probably just about anyone overweight will have elevated A1C. Pretty easy to get that tested and get the prescription. 1/3 of US adults would meet that standard.

    I am also doing periodic fasting mimicking diets. Along with that I am taking fisetin. I figured if they were having more luck removing senescent cells with a combination of treatments, that combining fisetin with fasting mimicking and quercetin might stand a better chance of removing more of these cells.

    I am also taking nicotinamide riboside. Took it before when it was a lower dose…it had no noticeable effects. Now…maybe. It is helping my mom. She has a ton more energy and is getting more done rather than just watching Youtube. I invested in the company (CDXC). With so many studies on the thing and some good results, I think they are going to be selling a lot more of this stuff.

    I think at least the senescent cell clearance is working. My bullet chess has gained about 40 Elo. And that has been fairly static for 8 years. I play about 10,000 games a year and track my stats. I am not any faster. I just seem to have better intuition when things get chaotic. I also noticed that I recover much better from having a lousy night’s sleep. I used to feel the effects for about 3 days. Now, just a little the next day. More like when I was in my teens or twenties.

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  5. I take metformin twice a day. I am 72. When I told my doctor about it he was skeptical but now he takes it twice a day also. 🙂

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