Microsoft Surging Over $1 Trillion to Number One

Microsoft stock surging over $1 trillion in market value in after hours trading with a strong earnings report.

Microsoft announced financials for 2019 Q3:

· Revenue was $30.6 billion and increased 14%
· Operating income was $10.3 billion and increased 25%
· Net income was $8.8 billion and increased 19%
· Diluted earnings per share was $1.14 and increased 20%

Microsoft returned $7.4 billion to shareholders in the form of share repurchases and dividends in the third quarter of fiscal year 2019.

Demand for cloud services grew 41% for a year ago and Office products were solid.

Apple is at $980 billion in value.
Amazon is at $935 billion.
Google is at $874 billion in value.

SOURCES : Microsoft

21 thoughts on “Microsoft Surging Over $1 Trillion to Number One”

  1. Win7 was the best. I love that OS and hated when they moved on to 10. Give me a PC over a Mac any day, you can fix them, and don’ need to buy proprietary software. I have only used Linux a little, too much stuff I need is not supported on it.

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  2. My master’s work was all done on Macintosh and I even bought one for at home (a necessity). None of the machines I used at work were Macintosh (they really bobbled it when they 1) didn’t license third party manufacture, and 2) didn’t do whatever it took to win the Desktop III contract–if they had then every government office would have been using Macs, rather than PCs, and probably would be still).

    Recall when someone came into the computer lab and told us that Microsoft was going to port Word and Excel over to work on IBM clones. We laughed. Sure, they were great on the Mac, but the PC side already had WordPerfect and WordStar, as well as Lotus 123. How would Microsoft get even a toehold in at that late date?

    Once bought a Beta VCR over VHS (it was the far superior product, but it was the wrong choice). Ever since I’ve constantly watched and frequently reassessed to make sure I was never going all in on the wrong horse, or staying in the saddle when it was time to change mounts.

    A few years later my Mac went to the closet and I bought a 386. Then I went full bore on a career in computing that was all Microsoft, all the way. Saying that worked well would be an understatement.

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  3. It will be used for file storage, a mail server and a host of other things that will help replace Google. There are other options for search as well.

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  4. You clearly don’t know what you’re talking about. Microsoft is not just Windows. Their cloud solution is amazing, they have arguably the best development tools on the market, and their hardware is not bad either.

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  5. NAS? I assume you mean a Network Attached Storage which would replace Google Drive but isn’t really going to help with search.

    Unless it’s a REALLY BIG NAS, you download the entire internet to it, and then map it at your leisure.

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  6. “Cloud and other business are linked to Office and Windows”

    From the Press release discussing Azure:

    “Server products and cloud services revenue increased 27% (up 29% in constant currency) driven by Azure revenue growth of 73% (up 75% in constant currency)”

    Reading. Powerful stuff.

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  7. Hey I warned them about the .com bubble burst and that 2016 was going to be uhh… interesting.

    I remember reading a story of some day trader whose stock portfolio consisted of $250 million in .com stocks. He lost it all. Also 2008 really was only bad if you bought a house near the height of the bubble or if you owned Lehman.

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  8. Sane internet poster (me): “Wow MS is on track to bring in $120 billion in revenue this year and their stock is going up!”

    (you): “I blame hyperinflation”

    No seriously $120 billion in revenue.

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  9. It isn’t 1998. MS has much more than Office and Windows.

    Or maybe for you it is 1998. Quick- sell all your .com stocks! Also 2016 is gonna be lit AF.

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  10. I’m using it at home right now, Arch with Compiz. I may have to use Windows and Windows products at work for now but I am working on excising the big data players from my life: Google, Microsoft, Facebook. I am busy building a NAS to replace Google and I won’t miss Windows.

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  11. The problem has never been the gap between the “haves and the have nots”.
    Worry a little less about how high the ceiling is and a little more about how low the floor is.

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  12. You are mistaking strength in product as the only determiner of market success. Business model, market position, capital position, and team level execution are critical components and can beat a solid product.

    Microsoft is excelling in all of these elements right now on the B2B level.

    I am close to Microsoft’s cloud execution with Azure and the ecosystem of players supporting cloud execution. Amazon has great product but hyperscaling their org has weakened their ability to execute in the market on the other elements and they lack deep enterprise experience and relationships.

    They are also competing against many key enterprises, which are doing their best to move their business into a non AWS ecosystem, including demanding the same of their key suppliers.

    Microsoft is positioned much better to leverage the ecosystem of partners and system integrators to drive enterprise towards Azure. Expect to see an acceleration of momentum towards Azure over AWS because Microsoft is building excellence in their business execution that AWS seems unable to competently match.

    The other shift is that the clouds are moving towards specialized capacities to keep from being commodified and the future is multicloud for any general compute capacity. Orchestration tools, along with containerization of applications, are coming online to return power to the buyers of cloud capacity by making operating a hybrid cloud and buying spot capacity to support application needs seamless.

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  13. I finally took the plunge to Linux a few years ago. I love it. Many different distributions, you can easily find one that works for you.

    However, I recently had to install Win7 on a machine to use a non-Linux product.

    Having the opportunity to experience Windows again revealed the best thing about Linux: it’s updates don’t break your OS and force you to spend hours fixing it.

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  14. Amazing what “click of a mouse” money creation and subsequent favored recipient lending can achieve, isn’t it?

    The USD continues to hyperinflate, but the rigging of the system pushes it into asset prices, further exacerbating the gap between the “haves and the have nots”. If history is any guide at all, this won’t end well.

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  15. Their products by most part are inferior. Their power is them having a legacy hold on the marker, but one by one it is being taken away from them, the browser, the phone operating system and soon the crown that holds them and let them continue moving forward, windows operating system and office.

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