NASA Reveals a Moon Plan That Relies on the Terrible SLS Rocket

NASA has selected 11 companies to conduct studies and produce prototypes of human landers for its Artemis lunar exploration program. This effort will help put American astronauts — the first woman and next man — on the Moon’s south pole by 2024 and establish sustainable missions by 2028.

NASA has asked for an extra $1.6 billion in funding for 2020 to support the moon by 2024 program.

NASA has shown a plan for 37 launches of private and NASA rockets, robotic and human landers and starting a moon base long-duration crew stays in 2028.

15 Years, $30 Billion and No Good Test of a Big Rocket Based on Shuttle Technology

The plan still relies on the crappy Space Launch System (SLS). SLS has NOT flown its first test flight. There was a test flight in the Constellation program which was before SLS. The Constellation test was terrible.

Space Launch System (SLS) spent about $17 billion from 2011 to 2019. It will spend another $4 billion from 2020 to 2021. There is about $2.3 billion per year being spent on SLS. From 2005 to 2010, there was about $11.9 billion spent on the Constellation program. This was paid to mainly the same companies working on Space Launch System. The whole thinking was let make a big rocket out of Space Shuttle Technology.

NASA Spreading $45 Million Around to Get Start Making a New Lunar Lander

Selected companies for Lunar Lander hardware development are:

Aerojet Rocketdyne – Canoga Park, California
One transfer vehicle study

Blue Origin – Kent, Washington
One descent element study, one transfer vehicle study, and one transfer vehicle prototype

Boeing – Houston
One descent element study, two descent element prototypes, one transfer vehicle study, one transfer vehicle prototype, one refueling element study, and one refueling element prototype

Dynetics – Huntsville, Alabama
One descent element study and five descent element prototypes

Lockheed Martin – Littleton, Colorado
One descent element study, four descent element prototypes, one transfer vehicle study, and one refueling element study

Masten Space Systems – Mojave, California
One descent element prototype

Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems – Dulles, Virginia
One descent element study, four descent element prototypes, one refueling element study, and one refueling element prototype

OrbitBeyond – Edison, New Jersey

Two refueling element prototypes
Sierra Nevada Corporation, Louisville, Colorado, and Madison, Wisconsin
One descent element study, one descent element prototype, one transfer vehicle study, one transfer vehicle prototype, and one refueling element study
SpaceX – Hawthorne, California
One descent element study
SSL – Palo Alto, California
One refueling element study and one refueling element prototype

SOURCES- NASA, Wikipedia

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