US Military Will Use Big Brother Monitoring Technology to Track All Movement in the USA

The US Military will conduct high altitude MESH networking radar tests over South Dakota to provide a persistent surveillance system to locate and deter narcotic trafficking and homeland security threats.

High altitude balloons will fly at twice the altitude of passenger jets and use radar to simultaneously track many individual vehicles day or night, through any kind of weather.

Interferometric synthetic aperture radar is a radar technique used in geodesy and remote sensing. This geodetic method uses two or more synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images to generate maps of surface deformation or digital elevation, using differences in the phase of the waves returning to the satellite or aircraft. The technique can potentially measure millimeter-scale changes in deformation over spans of days to years.

Synthetic aperture radar placed 20 times farther away than the militaries high altitude balloons can scan for features at 30 centimeters (one foot or less). Synthetic aperture radar from balloons would likely be able to create 3D surface images with one-centimeter accuracy. The balloons would be able to update several times a minute.

Simple high-resolution optical cameras were already used in Iraq, Afghanistan and Dayton, Ohio to monitor the movement of all people and vehicles. About ten years ago in Dayton a Cessna flew for everyday for weeks and created video that could be used to Tivo all movement. When murdered bodies were found they were able to rewind and find the house where the murderer lived. They were able to solve 75 murders over the period of the monitoring.

The technology for this monitoring is trivial. The radar monitoring can see through buildings and any other obstruction.


Dayton monitoring from about ten years ago

Not Shield Helicarriers But High Altitude Balloons

In the recent movie Captain America Winters Soldier there was a debate about this surveillance between Captain America and Nick Fury.


Hydra-Shield Monitoring from Helicarrier in fictional Winter’s Soldier Movie

46 thoughts on “US Military Will Use Big Brother Monitoring Technology to Track All Movement in the USA”

  1. Uhhhh. you still have to stop them. I highly doubt they are going to shoot them or stifle with some sort of ultra sonic pulse. (I am not a scientist so not using words that may best apply but best I can do) When 5 thousand are rushing the border that type of surveillance to me sounds just like an alert If the goal is to stop them this doesn't make sense for that purpose.

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  2. Unfortunately, in a world of over 7 billion people it may already be 6 billion people too late for that.

    Regardless, there are any number of technologies, especially some likely to be available in the next few decades, for which the entire planet would be a concentrated target, and human dispersal upon that planet won’t make a hill of beans difference.

    This is reportedly one of the reasons Elon Musk is pushing for off-planet settlement. That kind of dispersal and de-collectivization of our gene pool might make all the difference . . . in some scenarios.

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  3. Dizzyingly stupid? How so? I have seen comments I disagree with expressing world views I don’t share, but none have been dizzyingly stupid.

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  4. Removing the word “slave” from the dictionary some time in the near future will not have satisfactorily addressed its underlying evils, except to those working in the Ministry of Truth (and those dominated by said ministry).

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  5. Indeed, machines will do much, possibly most, of what we now call work. As work becomes obsolete we will start to receive MBIs and exist at the sufferance of our rulers, machine or animal. I disagree that all traditional work will become obsolete, certainly not not until we are ruled by AI. Moreover, even given that scenario there is no sign that the human mind, which created philosophy, mathematics and AI, will become obsolete. That view betokens an extreme Marxist weltanschauung which in my view goes overboard. There will always be beneficial activities that need to be performed by a human being. Not ALL of them will involve sex. (Humans have other values to add, don’t you think?) Anyway, my point is that physical metrics for living well are completely inadequate as they do not tell the whole story. Captive animals have their equivalent of three hots and a cot. The salient thing about slavery is not physicality but rather that slaves are held to exist solely for the benefit of their masters and this relationship is not governed by any concept of reciprocity towards fellow human beings. What happens when natural restraints against the will to dominate others are removed? I recommend the movie “The First Circle” as a work (particularly apropos here) that will suggest some possibilities as to how the higher human faculties may be enslaved and Andrew Lobaczewski’s book “Political Ponerology” for some ideas as to the motives.

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  6. Slaves? They are obsolete or close to it. A machine works better, faster, cheaper. Unless of course you are talking about sex slaves but that’s another story.
    Soon machines will do ALL the work. Then the word slave will virtually disappear from our language.

    Of course, soon so will the word privacy. We lose and give away more of that everyday.

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  7. I did misunderstand. You misunderstand me if you think I’m a standard-menu ideologue. I would not say that I have no requirements as to what constitutes an acceptable government but they do not hew to the templates used today by by both left and right. Rather, they are based on non-aggression and the discouragement of exploiting government in a differentially advantageous way by some power elite. I think this latter requirement of fairness is being increasingly violated. The existence of a stable middle class is desirable but does not, by itself, imply that it is built on good foundations. Slaves can and do coexist with a stable middle class.

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  8. You misunderstand me, probably it’s my fault. I do not care which system of government I live under, as long as it is the best one. I feel the best one is the system with the largest longest lasting middle class and how that middle class compares with the living standards of the rest of the world.
    Right now that is the United States. Stalin, Hitler, Mussolini and other notorious dictators and socialists etc. are/were more concerned like you with ideologically then the living standards of their people. Nationalism is great if you are bragging about the high living standards of your people but not so great if you are bragging about their freedom, privacy etc, while they are barefoot and living in mud huts.

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  9. Hmm … same “Creator” who zaps new limbs onto amputees who live pious lives and pray earnestly in their local place of worship. The idea of an interventionist Deity who cares if I eat pork, or have sex with my girlfriend, or if I die in an earthquake It could have prevented, that is a sackful of delusion.

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  10. We apparently can’t see the forest for the trees. The main reason evil doers can “unleash intense badness” has far more to do with the targets than the weapons, IMO. I also don’t think it’s a matter of the intensity of the badness but rather that the badness can be inflicted on many with no more effort than it would take to inflict it on one. A herd can be wiped out as easily as an individual if you can herd it into a place with no exit and where all members are highly and equally vulnerable. Sometimes it seems to me that this is exactly what our entire society is becoming. We need to de-collectivize and return to true, human sized organic communities; the kind our social instincts and cognitive abilities evolved to prosper and protect. For us, there is no real protection in the herd, only the illusion.

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  11. One mistake you are making is that you peg how well a person lives to availability of the physical requirements of life. This is only a necessary but not sufficient part of the picture. Even as far as these go, government is not responsible for them but rather the individuals with industry and talent who are motivated to create a good life for themselves and their families. Although my physical needs are met I am uncomfortable with many trends in our society which IMO detract from living well because they detract from human freedom and dignity. I think many of these negatives are exacerbated by our way of government, which has been tugged far away from its core principles. One can’t live well unless one can live free. I think this system of total, panopticon surveillance is only appropriate in two places, the first being a prison and the second a battlefield. IMO it has near zero utility when turned on a civilian population who are engaged in peaceful activities of life. There are no movements of tactical units that persist over time and distance in a terrorist attack. If there were, the conclusion would be that the attack was planned by sleepers and it would be then too late. In case of a lone terrorist or small cell, traditional security methods would be far more effective. I think this is a boondoggle as far as protecting the population goes. Keep it on the battlefield, where it would be obviously of great value.

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  12. You credit “our way of government” for our high living standard. Would that be our way of government “of the people, by the people, for the people?

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  13. Are you an adult? Did your parents neglect to tell you magic isn’t real, and it’s never a solution to non-fantasy problems?

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  14. Because the developer of the system several years ago found that local politicians were averse to what their constituents would think of the recording of one pixel, time-lapse images of themselves moving around.

    I think that might have been a little overboard, but where’s the line?

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  15. The number of people who, by themselves or in a small deranged and/or misguided group, will have the power to unleash intense badness will only increase over time. Read the latest theory about Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 in the June issue of Atlantic for a chilling example on a much smaller scale.

    Security and survival concerns always overwhelm concerns about freedom when it comes down to it. And the proponents don’t have to win all at once. Notice how Barr keeps trying to get us all to buy into allowing backdoor encryption “for our own safety.” He and people like him won’t stop trying, and occasionally, inch by inch, they will get their small victories, especially whenever a current news disaster tilts a quick reaction decision towards them.

    Personally, I am not thrilled about the seeming inevitability of a surveillance state. Already there are fewer and fewer chances of you going out to the store, buying gas, or just taking a drive or a walk, and not being captured on someone’s camera.

    I expect if it gets omnipresent in my lifetime (which would likely involve indefinite life extension becoming a reality) I would seek to avoid it by whatever means necessary, possibly even interstellar travel. Of course, a habitat in space would have a hard time resisting the temptation to install it all at the outset. Talk about contra-survival!

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  16. BTW, tOM C. how well do you live? Have you had any of your loved ones starving to death in your arms or perhaps dieing of a easily treatable disease?
    I have been to several 3rd world countries and have seen that kind of poverty for myself.
    Tom here even if your a homeless (and not on drugs) you are wearing shoes and have a coat. Statistically speaking you are probably even overweight.

    Ton, you need to realize how well you have it and asking me that question kind of tells me you don’t realize your good fortune.

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  17. Quote Tom C. “BTW, in what way do you think our employees are doing such a great job?”

    U.S. Citizens live better than 93% of the rest of the world. I credit our way of government and the people who run that government with achieving that. Not the conspiracy theorists, nor the naysayers with doing anything but trying to rock the boat, because they don’t realize what they have.

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  18. GP radar gets absorbed or reflected by anything conductive – metal or damp soil. With dry sandy soil or solid stone they might get 50′ (civilian equipment in direct contact with the ground). Normal soil maybe 10′.

    Maybe military grade equipment, even operating from the air, could do 5x to 10x better (at least without frying people in the streets)?

    A wood frame residence – easily penetrated. Probably a warehouse with a concrete and re-bar roof. An old warehouse with sheet metal roofing – maybe.

    But a 10-20 floor office building with lots of re-bar and many air to concrete interfaces to absorb and scatter the radar? Still seems doubtful to me.

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  19. Way I hear it there is only one American Indian worth worrying about, and that’s because she’s running for president.

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  20. What you describe is right out of the classics of “dystopian fiction,” which I believe were actually intended to be the manuals they have apparently become. Contra survival to stop it? Where is this stuff coming from? Somebodies garage? This and all the technology that can threaten human existence, is of a piece and is a direct product of the inorganic and anti-human way in which we have become organized. What all this junk has in common is that none of it came from some genius’ brain, nor from some inventors garage. All of this stuff required a work-gang to rival the ones that built the pyramids. Quit thinking of it as something that just tends to happen, for better or worse. This is some pervert’s wet dream that we have and will be paying for. We obviously need to take back the lion’s share of responsibility for our own security. We need to do a 180 on stuff like this. While Atlas should have been shrugging he was playing with himself.

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  21. Don’t be so sure. Ground penetrating radar has long been used in archeology to find the buried ruins of cities. State-of-the-art tech is probably orders of magnitude better. Take-away is: put your towel on immediately upon leaving the shower.

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  22. The classical 1776 Revolutionary take would be that it’s the duty of every human being who wants to be free to restrain governmental overreach and limit government itself. Without that tension, government would expand to fill the vacuum of abdicated freedoms, ironically like a high altitude balloon. BTW, in what way do you think our employees are doing such a great job? I always welcome the opinions of an optimist, and as optimists go you are apparently, in the phrasing of the eponymous song from “South Pacific,” a highly cockeyed one. I do think there is some reason to be a teeny tiny tad bit optimistic because at least we’ve been told about this. Hopefully the motive for doing so is to reassure us that Ike’s “Cross of Iron” speech was paranoid and that our trillions are being well spent, and to share the sheer techno-coolness of it all. How cool would a job in the control room be! OTOH, it could be to let us slowly figure out that we’re well and truly effed. I, for one, am going to take your lead and remain optimistic because the alternative is simply too terrifying. Besides, our impishly Hegelian employees have a great track record on drugs and illegal migration, so I’m sure all this info will be well used. BTW, great job, employees! Make a note to give yourselves a raise, if you haven’t already.

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  23. New barriers have been built. Under Trump, Obama, Bush, Clinton, Bush, Reagan, etc. But no ADDITIONAL fencing has been built by Trump.
    Trump knows his odds of winning a second term rely heavily on not just replacing run down fencing, but also adding NEW fencing. He got a big win late last month when the Supreme court allowed $2.5 billion to come from the DoD, to build additional fencing. You can bet a year from now, it will be in full swing, and he will have loads of video/pictures to prove to his voters that he’s a man of his word.

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  24. Ah the people of the cities and the suburbs shall demand SAFETY! and thus render unto the government the powers all authoritarians need.

    The face of the new authority or at least its enablers seems to have less to do with evil white men from the country waving American flags and more to do with single mothers from the middle class demanding everything look nice and safe.

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  25. This kind of technology would be great for the battle field. I am kind of iffy on it for a civilian role. Maybe OK for very high crime areas.

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  26. When Big Brother is providing the solution for the issues he is creating or helping create, then we have lost our freedoms. That is, those within the governmental entities that are promoting open borders and facilitating illegal immigration. And those within the government that are bringing in illegal drugs through sanctioned cartels to support their illegal activities. Or any number of other illegal activities and false flags. Then they provide the solution for the problems they have themselves created. Except their solution was all along for the purpose of surveilling and controlling the populace but had to make it palatable to them through these and other contrived means along with the beating of the drums by media brainwashing.

    The solution is not more government (Big Brother) control. The solution is a moral people. The way people become moral is by acknowledging and revering their Creator. The Creator brings form and order out of chaos. Conversely when man is in control without acknowledging and revering the Creator, chaos results as form and order deteriorate.

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  27. 1) If they were testing it on the southern border it would raise even more controversy, earlier.

    2) If the military is doing the testing, they have designs on using it outside of the country (would be great for interdicting traffic between Iran and Iraq.

    3) If the same technology is used within the country on an operational basis it will almost certainly be a technology transfer to the FBI, Homeland Security, the border patrol, or whoever else.

    4) Technology is only going to increase the number of individuals that can pose huge or even existential threats to humanity. Given this, a while back, Stephen Hawking posed a question as to how human beings could survive the next century. He went with off-world colonies but that doesn’t help Earth survive.

    Here on Earth it seems highly likely that every man, woman, and child will have multiple AI systems monitoring us at all times.
     
    They will note you just bought a bag of fertilizer, your third this month, while your only plants are in a couple of pots on your balcony and not looking any greener. Then the warning.
     
    Some will argue privacy is not a concern since only machines are watching until they find probable cause. Others will say that, regardless, security concerns trump privacy. This technology is right in line with all of that. Is it contra-survival to stop it? I don’t know, but I expect China will leap on it with both feet, regardless.

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  28. “The radar monitoring can see through buildings and any other obstruction.”

    Um… really? They can see through multi-level parking garages under office buildings? I doubt that.

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  29. First off, no new barrier is being built. Second, a wall would funnel all illegal migrants through a port entry regardless of the political will. Even if you would know every border crossing (which you could with surveilance), you would still have to intercept every migrant.

    The latter would only happen as much as the political will to do so, and we both know that all democrat politicians and most conservative ones don’t have any real intention of stopping the flow. New voters and cheap labour for the donors…

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  30. Even though I can’t disagree with your sentiment. Where does the constitution or the bill of rights say “patriotic duty to question all forms of information gathering”?

    I would say it is our patriotic duty not to tie the hands of our government employees. Especially since they are most assuredly doing such a great job.

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  31. So why introduce this in South Dakota?
    I didn’t think you guys had any threats to national security there. At least not since the Battle of Wounded Knee.

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  32. So how come we cannot close the Southern border with Mexico to illegal aliens? No one should be able to “waltz” across our borders even with low tech eyeballs on the border let alone centimeter resolution SAR. As for garden variety crime all the high tech in the world cannot prevent crime if judges subscribe to ridiculous doctrines such as “Criminal Justice Reform” which is nothing more than a revisit to the revolving door of the 1970’s. We cam as a country “arrest our way out of a crime epidemic“. People who murder, rape, commit armed robbery and traffic in drugs belong in prison. They do not belong on our streets to become a third, fourth, fifth, etc. offenders. High tech should make convictions easy but it’s the “convictions” of the body politic that will make the most difference in the end!

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  33. Yoy may be correct. However, it is your patriotic duty to question all forms of information gathering of the individual by the federal government. It’s not the information, it’s the use of it that abuses the constitution…..low hanging fruit would be unlawful search and seizure if it sees through my roof with my curtains closed.

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  34. Great!
    We pay them good money to keep us safe. Besides they are one of the reasons we Americans live better than 93% of the rest of the world.
    They must be doing a whole lot right.
    Perhaps, if some of you could rock the boat hard enough your kids would not be as safe or well off.

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