Microsoft Wins $10 Billion Military Cloud Computing Contract

Microsoft won the Department of Defense JEDI ten year cloud computing contract.

Amazon Web Services was believed to be the favorite to win the contract.

azon owns nearly half of the world’s public-cloud infrastructure market

Gardner reports the worldwide infrastructure as a service (IaaS) market -cloud computing/ grew 31.3% in 2018 reaching $32.4 billion, up from $24.7 billion in 2017 with Amazon Web Services (AWS) once again being the top vendor, owning nearly half of the overall public-cloud infrastructure market (47.8%), leading by a wide margin Microsoft (15.5%), Alibaba (7.7%), Google (4%), and IBM (1.8%). Microsoft and Google have faster growth in 2019.

The Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure program will replace the U.S. military’s poorly integrated, aged computer networks and clouds with a single cloud system that would encompass all networked assets, from soldiers on the ground to all of its combat aircraft and naval vessels.

10 thoughts on “Microsoft Wins $10 Billion Military Cloud Computing Contract”

  1. I really don’t see how this is bad, all industries in capitalism have downsides. Maybe just because it has ‘military’ it sets people such as yourself off.

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  2. 4800 baud with 2x compression (9600 baud effective) is about the limit of most average adults reading speed, so that’s still a very useful network.

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  3. This is something I’ve been involved with for work (do cost/benefit analysis for outsourcing “cloud” stuff) and if you were going to ask me which of the big three you should go with assuming you’re committed to that route (Google, Amazon, Microsoft) I’d recommend Microsoft as first choice.*

    So I’m not so sure.

    *we went with none of them; too expensive. We ended up making our own internal cloud.

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  4. There once was something called the Worldwide Military Command and Control System Intercomputer Network. Back to the future 1970s. It was this amazing collection of really big computers, full of data, that were connected by a dedicated telecommunication system that spanned the globe and even was available on airplanes.
    Nowadays we call this “the cloud” and “the internet” and “inflight internet”. Back in the day, WMCCS could transmit data at a blistering 4800 baud.

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  5. ”…program will replace the U.S. military’s poorly integrated, aged computer networks and clouds with a single cloud system that would encompass all networked assets, from soldiers on the ground to all of its combat aircraft and naval vessels…

    Terrible idea…

    Reply

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