Large Conservative Majority in UK Which Means Brexit By End of 2020 – Tories 368 Seats

Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Conservatives set to win an outright majority according to exit polls.

This will mean Johnson can deliver on his promise for a Brexit by the end of 2020.

The EU economy will shrink by $3 trillion. China (with Hong Kong and Macau) will become larger than the combined economies of EU members by the end of 2021.

The joint Sky/BBC/ITV poll gives the Tories 368 seats with Labour on 191, the SNP on 55 and LibDems 13. The Tory majority is projected to be 86.

SOURCES- Telegraph, Reuters
Written By Brian Wang, Nextbigfuture.com

73 thoughts on “Large Conservative Majority in UK Which Means Brexit By End of 2020 – Tories 368 Seats”

  1. Ai! Kilts are a modern invention by those lowlanders corrupted by the Englishers!

    True Scotsmen will fight naked and painted blue like nature intended.

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  2. Is that still in the right location?

    30 seconds on Google says that Hadrian’s wall is south of the current border, and the Antonine wall is north of the current border.

    They need a 3rd, Farrell’s wall at the current border.

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  3. The papal election has been (theo)logically demonstrated to always pick the right candidate. Which makes me wonder why the old b has been wandering around Japan and Korea, effectively telling them to turn their nukes off and burn coal.

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  4. Switzerland had a referendum to get rid of their nuclear reactors in the early seventies. It failed by less than half a percent, and since then nuclear has provided almost half their power, carbon free – but the opponents have still been pushing through more anti-nuke referenda every couple of years. Austria, under a social democratic government that wanted get half its power from nuclear, had a referendum about the same time that lost by about half a percent, and built coal plants instead. ( Now they get the power from over the border, and claim they’re ‘clean and green.’)
    Referenda in California are regularly gamed by lobby groups with big advertising budgets. They’ve crippled the city governments by blocking taxes, so basic services and infrastructure head for third world status.

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  5. I’ve always been fascinated by the fact that everyone that brings up the problem of a “leaking” border with respect to customs never try to quantify the problem. So, if GB could import, say, agricultural products cheaper form outside of the EU how much would then be funneled to Europe via Scotland? Would it be a torrent of just a fraction of a percent of the food market in the rest of Europe?

    My feeling is that the remainers are making a mountain of a molehill to bolster their arguments…

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  6. Interesting. You realize that if you weaken national governments and put the power in the hands of a global government, there will be very little meaningful self determination for anyone?

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  7. Switzerland works with lots of binding referendums, and it works just fine. It turns out, when you give the voters direct control of the levers of government it prohibits the power players to do things “below the radar” that are both stupid and irrational.

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  8. 95% of humanity lives on ten percent of the land, so they’re likely to call the tune. The last time I can think of that things went the other way was when Genghis Khan’s boys came off the steppe, and made pyramids of skulls out of any city that didn’t surrender.

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  9. I do approve, and I hope that you can realize the huge leap forward that it will be for humanity. If done right of course. I do see how some people see that in some ways the EU has not done it right, some mistakes can be learned from.

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  10. The EU is not about communism, it is a pioneering attempt together with the UN that at one point if humanity will stay on course for a higher level evolution will lead to a weak both national governments and a world government world.

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  11. Well shoot, it is almost as if Boris Johnson ran on finishing Brexit. Kind of like he made this election a referendum on Brexit. Kind of like Nigel Farage cleared the deck for the Tories so that Brexit could be finished.

    Being an erudite man you do know that the Tories are “Pro Brexit Now” while the Labour party is “Pro Brexit Sometime”. So how in the world could you have a second referendum when the two top parties are Pro Brexit?

    I mean you would have to secretly believe that one of the parties was lying to the entire electorate about their Brexit intentions in order to think that a second referendum would produce a different result than the first.

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  12. It is amazing to observe how some people think that any deviation from the path leading to Communism is “working against the interests of the people”.

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  13. I’m super looking forward to a future where the Scotland-England border is a hotbed of smuggling and tariff avoidance.

    But yes if all the SNP Socialists stay in the EU and cannot vote in UK elections then Labor will be in an electoral desert for half a century.

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  14. The UK hasn’t had any international trade negotiation teams for forty years, so they’re a bit out of practice. New Zealand has had to do its own deals since Ma Britain cut the apron strings back then, and has been giving them some advice.

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  15. The rationale for democracy is one man (other genders are available) one vote. First past the post provides that, but makes sure that some people’s votes are worth a lot more than others’. The Brexit referendum did actually value all votes equally, but I still think referendums are bad. They provide complex problems with simple, and wrong, solutions, and are fertile ground for liars, charlatans, and the self-deluded. Proportional representation usually leads to coalition governments, representing the diversity of views and interests in a country, and ensures that the people drafting the laws are responsible for putting them into effect.

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  16. When you graduate from school and look back on this time, you’ll notice that the USA is mere years away from collapsing in a death spiral… every couple of years.
    Indeed it seems to happen every time that a government with politics that big main stream media* disagree with.

    Somehow it never seems to actually happen. Well, once in 1860. But even that didn’t stick.

    *Assumes that the main stream media doesn’t collapse into a death spiral. Which is a lot more likely.

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  17. You just did, bub. 🙂

    This was a Brexit election with one major party ‘pro’, the other very much dragging their feet athwart it, while the remainder voted on tangential issues. The former smashed the latter.

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  18. It’s a good day for the UK. I voted to Remain in the EU but democracy demands we accept the result and leave. The UK has wasted the past 3 years arguing about Brexit in political stalemate with an essentially hung Parliament. Now we have a government with a strong mandate to finish Brexit and get on with other important policies. I celebrated, as did many who voted Labour their entire lives.

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  19. I live and work with african americans and latino’s and others. Hell my neighbors is black.

    The truth? Things have never been less tense. Its only in the big cities where things get horrible.

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  20. Does that include jeremy corbyn and his support for Anarchist, Communist, Islamist And…..oh wait no he hates Jews and so do much of Labour….Huh funny that.

    But hey if you want to be the whipping boy of Europe for having the balls to fight for yourselves go ahead vote Labour.

    Funny thing. The people voting against Progressives around the world all seem to be the people getting screwed by it funny that…the people for it?? Funny also the middle and upper class in big cities or the poor in big cities who are brainwashed from grade 1.

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  21. Because of the first past the post voting system, they can have a ‘landslide victory’ in Parliament with less than fifty percent of the vote – just as Trump won the US presidency with three million fewer votes than Clinton. It just took a split vote for remain, and a single party for leave ( Farage’s Brexit Party withdrew from all Tory held seats, effectively handing their support to Johnson.)

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  22. Yes, because nobody in the UK has the talent or ability to negotiate on behalf of their country. Just a bunch of ignoramuses! Only nanny state politics give the people their just due. Wake up!

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  23. That democracy worked against the interest of the people is your opinion. To the best of my understanding, you are neither a native, nor do I think you live there, and so what do you understand about the interest of these people ?
    We tend to know perfectly well what other people should do, but we mostly are not very good to decide as to what is best for ourselves.
    PS.: I do know a lot of Germans, and nearly all of them express gripes about “European” overreach and of course immigration. So while the European leaders sing from the same hymn sheet, the people in the street, changed the lyrics to ribald and sarcastic.
    Notice the rise of the right leaning parties in different countries? Their support comes from opposition to the bureaucrats in Brussels

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  24. Pity really the end of the union – Boris will be the last PM of GB the scots and Irish will rejoin the EU and prosper the US in its death throes will drag England and Wales into poverty- to be followed by the final collapse of the US consuming itself in inequality racism and greed

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  25. I doubt that very much, the UK has very little of the national power they had when the EU’s progenitor first formed – thus negotiation will probably favor America if a new agreement is made with them, goodbye what public NHS remained, hello US favorable patent terms and other laws that favor US companies selling in the UK.

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  26. Most likely you are right, but everything is a matter of perception: agreeing on a core set of principles for trade, people movement and governance it’s not the same as visibly taking orders and foreign-defined policies.

    At least not as voters see it.

    And if people perceive their treatment is unfair, they will vote against it.

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  27. Seems the UK now wants to follow Switzerland’s path

    You sure?

    Most EU law applies universally throughout the EU, the EEA and Switzerland, providing most of the conditions of the free movement of people, goods, services and capital that apply to the member states.

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  28. Voting in favor of less centralized government and more local control is not necessarily “work against the interest of the people”. To a big government advocate who believes the people should have less say in policy, I can see your point. However, to those of a more “power to the people” POV, this is definitely in the people’s best interest.

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  29. I hope the EU will start fortifying their western borders now, because I really don’t feel like paying for those British refugees 😛

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  30. Me thinks that’s the gist of it: people feeling as if they are getting policies from people they didn’t vote for, imposing things that aren’t in their best interest.

    Seems the UK now wants to follow Switzerland’s path and remain a friendly but independent actor in Europe.

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  31. The left has spent so much time domesticating “the right” into a lighter version of themselves, that when an untamed alternative arises they can’t process it anymore.

    But yeah, democracy is not only about people voting for those I like or agree with.

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  32. You have no understanding of what is going on. When you don’t agree with something it must be because of the stupidity of the people, thus revealing your prejudice. Democracy, which the U.K. is not, isn’t working against the people. The people want to decide what happens within their own borders and not allow non-elected officials to dictate what they can and can’t do. Watch the U.K. over the next decade and how much better it does than the EU.

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  33. Another reason Corbyn lost so badly is he is deeply toxic to many UK voters, even if Labour’s policies overall are not.
    Lib-Dems were onto a loser as soon as they stated their policy would be to cancel the referendum result. Whichever side of the fence you fall on, that’s fundamentally undemocratic.

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  34. Of course is “good” for the UK. There is a reason for why so many commentators called this results a “masochist” move

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  35. As far as I can tell, there was demagoguery on both sides of the issue, so who is to say which was the more untruthful?

    Besides, even if you could – and I’m not saying it’s so – argue that GB will loose economically because of Brexit, not everything is about money. A lot of people will think that a slight decrease in growth rate is a price worth paying to obtain control of immigration and making their own laws and policies. Do you think that these aspects are worth nothing, or do you think that the projected price is too high?

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  36. The popups seem much worse on some browser software than others. Try a few alternative browsers?

    But yes, I agree. Brian, don’t push us into getting add blockers because the ads got too greedy.

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  37. It is amazing to observe how a democracy can work against the interests of the people. The first time it was for a lack of understanding and demagoguery, This time it is because voting for Johnson is the easiest way to get over with this saga.

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  38. Good for the UK. Communists loose (Corbyn) and UK get’s its opportunity to guide its own future. Hopefully, they get away from the nanny state while they are at it. Make the UK great again. They have spent the last 100 years pissing away a once great empire.

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  39. At least this time the UK electorate had an chance to understand the alternatives. It seems like a foolish choice but it was legitimately Democratic.

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