Early US 2020 Census Shows Strong Growth in Texas

Texas has 6 of the top 15 fastest growing cities. Since the 2010 Census, the populations of large southern cities increased by an average of 11.8%. In contrast, large cities in the West grew by 9.1%, whereas large cities in the Northeast and Midwest grew by 1.5% and 3.1%, respectively.

On June 25, 2020, the Census Bureau will release estimates of the July 1, 2019, population for the nation, states and counties by age, sex, race and Hispanic origin.

The Census Bureau real-time population clock has the US population at just short of 330 million.

Texas population grew from 25 million in 2010 to nearly 29 million in mid-2019. Texas population is increasing by about 1.2 million each year. Texas should be passing 30 million people now and by July 2020 should be 30.2 million and should be nearly 31 million by the end of 2020.

Top 10 states growth rates from 2018 to 2019

‒ Idaho: 2.1 pct.
‒ Nevada: 1.7 pct.
‒ Arizona: 1.7 pct.
‒ Utah: 1.7 pct.
‒ Texas: 1.3 pct.
‒ South Carolina: 1.3 pct.
‒ Washington: 1.2 pct.
‒ Colorado: 1.2 pct.
‒ Florida: 1.1 pct.
‒ North Carolina: 1 pct.

On average from 2010-2020, small cities and towns — those with fewer than 5,000 people — have seen uneven growth across U.S. regions:

Western small towns saw the largest growth with an increase of 13.3%.
Southern small towns grew by 6.7%.
Northeastern small towns declined by 3.0%.
Midwest small towns declined by 1.7%.

[Source: U.S. Census Bureau]

SOURCES- US Census
Written By Brian Wang, Nextbigfuture.com

33 thoughts on “Early US 2020 Census Shows Strong Growth in Texas”

  1. Also we have snakes, spiders, scorpions, we don’t brush our teeth, and it’s six thousand degrees every day in the summer. Stay in CA, folks. 😉

  2. I am an atheist moderate, and I have many like-minded friends. Houston is literally one of the most diverse cities in the nation (race, ethnicity, religion). I would tell anyone who projects intolerance onto Texans to get out and explore! There are many social circles to jump into if you look.

  3. Wait are you saying the modelers aren’t batting a thousand? How would that happen given the power of science? Gosh I must find a way to be less subtle with my sarcasm.

  4. On the basis of property CA is 2x more expensive than TX. (TX property is half the price but taxes are one quarter CA taxes)

    Also TX has no income tax… I pay plenty there in CA. In no universe is the tax burden between TX anywhere near the tax burden in CA.

  5. The Wuhan lab virus models predicted up to 2.2 million deaths in the US alone. Right now the death toll is at 333,000 globally and the number of new cases and deaths are dropping. Is it really unfairly dumping on the Covid-19 modelers if they were way off on their estimates?

  6. You’re paying on value of property, right? Compare two equal pieces of property. If the value of the Texas property was equivalent to the California property, it would be in unaffordable at Texas rates. Ive done an apples to apples square foot comparison with a friends’ home in north Dallas. He would be paying just over 3X the amount for the same sized house if it was valued the same.

  7. My property tax on 1,600 sq ft in SoCal is roughly equal to my Mother’s 4×1,600 Texas townhomes. So on a sqft basis CA property taxes are four times TX and she is paying for surrounding land where I don’t even get a yard.

    In the meantime it seems that every CA election will have some cleverly worded ballot initiative that will eliminate Prop 13 so that CA can raise property taxes even more.

    CA residents pay for roads that we aren’t driving, Police that let criminals go loose up to three times a day (hello Glendora), schools that are going to be doing distance learning probably in to 2021… not a good value proposition.

  8. Not even close to being true. Firearm ownership and a love for BBQ are just as good as belonging to a church.

  9. I for one can’t stand people who dump on Cov-19 modelers- I mean those people are batting a thousand.

  10. Likely true. I may have to try asking for a liquor store or a porn shop just for the reaction. Oh evil, damned for eternity me.

  11. You gotta hang out with other people. There are assholes everywhere. The south is just traditionally a couple generations behind the north in mannerisms, religion, politics, etc…, but I think the internet has sped up the catch-up. The younger folks in Texas are just like the young folks up north now. My experience only, married into family from TX and LA, YMMV. Now Mormon rich areas on the other hand, those people look down on you if you just ask where the local liquor store is, or nearest porn shop, or don’t have kids by the time you’re 20, or swear too much, etc…

  12. Spot on. The recent dumping on scientists over Covid is a prime example. They’d rather be ignorant than believe a know it all.

  13. Personally, I avoid those self-righteous hypocritical morons. I place many of the country’s problems on their narrow ideas. I’d rather hang out with atheists.

  14. Gerard Kitchen O’Neill, “The High Frontier”. Bezos Blue Origin HQ is the “O’Neill” Bldg.

  15. I posit the migration to these supposedly cheaper places to live are the result of jobs in the larger employment parts of the country requiring an ever increasing amount of education and specialization, something which is generally in decline across the United States. It doesn’t help matters much when being educated is looked down upon by certain ideological population groups who look upon it with distrust and cries of indoctrination.

  16. I would say the flyover part is the issue. You refuse to move forward with the times. The 1950s are never coming back, and you may just have to extend some balance and fairness to minorities and others unlike you.

  17. California is fine thanks. After removing Republicans from the local level to the state level, we got back in the black (corona virus withstanding). The damage done to the state’s retirement fund is going to take a few more years of repair after the damage the Republicans did to it.

  18. Have you been to Texas? Unless you belong to the ‘right’ church, you are socially shunned and will not make anything past an acquaintance. My experience and others in my family. Why live somewhere we’re you’re miserable and not accepted?

  19. And them not changing their voting habits is a good thing. We’re trying to bring the restless natives back into the light. Austin? That’s a shining beacon of light, surrounded by a cesspool of backwards medocrity.

  20. Happy socially? Texas is full of evangelical christians. Those people are assholes, and nuts. Lower regulations? That means local companies can pollute more, and there’s no one there to stop them. Taxes? OK, no state income tax, but you’re property tax could be defined as a sexual bodily assault charge.

  21. Blue flight has been responsible for flipping several states including Colorado and North Carolina. Their voting habits are a testament to the arrogance of these people who fled their home state after wrecking it and then throwing their weight around telling the so-called redneck hicks in “flyover country” how to run literally everything. Not just their government, but their lives, how they run their economy, etc.

    BTW: that sounds exactly like  Shelia Broflovsk, Kyle’s mother from South Park – originally from New York, looks like on everyone else in South Park, and is insufferable busybody whose has a “my way or the highway” attitude.

  22. No. This is bad news because a large part of this growth we see is from leftists moving from Democrat-run states[mostly Cali] to Texas. The problem is they don’t change their voting habits so they will try and flip Texas into the disaster they left behind.
    I’ve noticed a difference in Austin’s demographics from 7 years ago to now. And I don’t mean racial; it’s just a completely different type of people and I don’t like it, nevermind that they have jacked up the cost of living here by flooding the place and the infrastructure was barely getting by at that time, much less now.

  23. Glad to hear! As a Texan (in Houston), I am not surprised. No state income tax, high wages, low housing costs (compared to similar population-sized cities in other states), diverse business opportunities (no longer strictly oil & gas), less regulation, and many other factors are bringing people (and money) in droves. I expect this trend to continue. We have our issues, sure, but I am very happy here economically & socially.

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