CDC Tells States to Prepare to Distribute Vaccines By November 1, 2020 and Maybe End of October

A letter from Robert Redfield, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is telling states they will soon be receiving permit applications from McKesson Corp to distribute vaccines to places including state and local health departments and hospitals.

The CDC is urgently requesting state governor assistance in expediting applications for vaccine distribution facilities and, if necessary, asks that you consider waiving requirements that would prevent these facilities from becoming fully operational by November 1, 2020.

McKesson is the largest seasonal flu vaccine distributor in the U.S. and distributes up to 150 million doses of all vaccines annually to public health clinics, hospitals, physician offices, nursing homes, pharmacies and other care facilities.

The CDC also sent three planning documents to some health departments that included possible timelines for when vaccines would be available. The documents are to be used to develop plans for early vaccination when the supply might be constrained, according to one of the documents, which outlined a scenario in which a vaccine could be available as soon as the end of October.

One of the CDC documents says that limited COVID-19 vaccine doses may be available by early November and that supply will increase substantially in 2021.

SOURCES -CDC, ABC News
Written By Brian Wang, Nextbigfuture.com

16 thoughts on “CDC Tells States to Prepare to Distribute Vaccines By November 1, 2020 and Maybe End of October”

  1. This was noted at an Infectious Disease conference a couple of years ago.
    An immediate question was, "Should we give ourselves 4 shots?"
    There were enough of us in the meeting for whom this was a relevant query, and most of us had access to good supplies of various trivalent flu vaccines.
    Sadly, the expert reply was that the vaccine needed to be four times more potent to help those of us past age 65!

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  2. Notice how every proposed vaccine requires a booster and might have 6-12 month immunity?

    Welcome to the new flu shot. Though, it's a more deadly variety.

    In other News, lets congratulate The Plague and it's return; specifically, in Lake Tahoe, CA.

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  3. Many vaccines have a reduced effectiveness in the elderly, meaning that they rely on other people getting vaccinated to reduce their likelihood of infection.

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  4. Only 17% of the USA population is at very high risk of dying and/or a hospital visit, and if 1/3 refuse vaccination, that's only like 33 million doses needed.

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  5. A covid-19 vaccine won't cure/prevent the "common cold" though. If you get a covid-19 vaccine you'll still be able to catch it; that's just the way those viruses work. The difference is you'll shake it off after 3-5 days (or not notice the symptoms at all) and it will never leave the surface mucosa of your nasal cavity. No death; no hospital.
    The reason there was never a real demand for a coronavirus vaccine for currently circulating ones (before covid-2019) in humans was that is was a very difficult sell – you're asking people to pay for and take a vaccine so they won't die of a "chest cold" which frankly very few people did before this novel coronavirus came onto the scene. Pretty much the only people you heard of dying of "viral pneumonia" aka a coronavirus were like 85 years and older.
    It was very shortsighted and bad risk management because it didn't count in future pandemic risk – dozens of coronavirus experts were trying to get a vaccine funded by the US legislature for many years without success.

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  6. key word "probably". You first. I'm immune so no skin in the game for me…..
    IF companies like Pfizer can make a proven and effective vaccine against a coronavirus (which has never been close to being accomplished) in under 6 months, then we have 2 big problems.

    One, the entire pharma industry has been lying to us for the past 100 years on why they can't cure the common cold and why it takes hundreds of billions (that we all pay for) over decades to develop drugs which may have poor outcomes, and "unusual" side-effects.

    Two, the pharmaceutical control system (FDA, MHRA etc) has lied to us about their primary concern about patient safety in that they've prevented many other life-saving drugs from entering the market in a timely manner.

    I don't buy their story. Then let's just "fast track" cures for cancer and other problems that are "slow" tracked.

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  7. The Chinese also have a vaccine which they are so far only distributing to military. There are vaccines in expedited stage 3 trials in the US and Britain. Most of the vaccines are probably fine. Moderna and Pfizer are probably the 2 vaccines the FDA is going to distribute. They have developed capacity to rapidly produce tens of millions of doses within months.

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  8. kinda misleading. The only vaccine that is remotely near to be be distributed is the Russian Sputnik, which I assume readers and contributors here wouldn't take even for a million rubles. CDC might be getting ready to distribute, but what exactly would they distribute? Looks to me like a end-of-2021 topic.

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