Search Results for: label/printable electronics

carsCarbon 60, fullerene, thin film electronics closer to electronic billboards

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Using room-temperature processing, researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have fabricated high-performance field effect transistors with thin films of Carbon 60, also known as fullerene. The ability to produce devices with such performance with an organic semiconductor represents another …

nuclearIEEE Spectrum : The Singularity a Special Report

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IEEE Spectrum has a special report on the Singularity with contributions from several authors. Vernor Vinge first postulated the concept of a technological Singularity and he has an essay “Signs of the Singularity” and a video “How to Prepare for …

albertaReviewing my predictions on the future and recent Gartner predictions

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Here is another update to my March 2006 technology predictions. Prediction: Real-time biomarker tracking and monitoring 2008-2012 Progress: Cheap less than $100 USB gene testerOld mockup of the cheap gene tester. The device is now much smaller than size of …

diseaseSingularity lite: one to two levels of faster technological change

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The technological singularity is a hypothesized point in the future variously characterized by the technological creation of self-improving intelligence, unprecedentedly rapid technological progress, or some combination of the two. I would want to focus on the aspect of “unprecendentedly rapid …

bootstrapping nanotechnologyGlasses with displays projected into your retina ? Old school. Now contact lens with displays

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Engineers at the University of Washington have for the first time used manufacturing techniques at microscopic scales to combine a flexible, biologically safe contact lens with an imprinted electronic circuit and lights. Previously the Virtual Retina display (VRD) was invented …

futureCarbon nanotubes on plastic 312 megahertz instead of kilohertz for current plastic circuits

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Scientists from the University of Massachusetts Lowell and Brewer Science, Inc. have used carbon nanotubes as the basis for a high-speed (312 megahertz) thin-film transistors printed onto sheets of flexible plastic. Their method may allow large-area electronic circuits to be …