Tesla makes by far the safest cars

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration rates the Model 3, Model S and Model X as the cars with the lowest probability of injury. The Tesla Model 3 has the lowest probability of injury of all cars the safety agency has ever tested.

The agency’s data shows that vehicle occupants are less likely to get seriously hurt in these types of crashes when in a Model 3 than in any other car. NHTSA’s previous tests of Model S and Model X still hold the record for the second and third lowest probabilities of injury, making Tesla vehicles the best ever rated by NHTSA.

Model 3 is the top-selling American car model

The Tesla Model 3 was the top-selling American car model in September. The only three cars that sold more than this American success story were the Toyota Camry, Honda Accord, and Honda Civic.

If the Model 3, increases it sales by 15-20% then it will become the top-selling passenger car model in the USA.

50 thoughts on “Tesla makes by far the safest cars”

  1. If you factor out the rollover risk” the Tesla isn’t more or less safer than cars of equal size and weight. “” “””

    Reply
  2. If you factor out the rollover risk” the Tesla isn’t more or less safer than cars of equal size and weight. “” “””

    Reply
  3. Nope on the first. Of course no one tries to have a crash, but you want a car where you are safe in one. Tesla is safe for the size and weight, no doubt. If you factor out the rollover risk, the Tesla isn’t more or less safer than cars of equal size and weight. But you can have safer car if you go heavier and bigger. A F150 is far safer than a Chevy Volt. The fire hazard? NHTSA doesn’t test for that specifically because the cars tested are prepared not to combust (except for the Volt that burned up after an impact test). The NHTSA so far hasn’t developed tests specifically for battery combustion (e.g., debris punctures) in EV’s. I can’t reconcile your statement that EV’s catch fire less often than ICE – where you compare apples to apples (same year manufactured, same number miles driven, same situation). Statistics which don’t seem to be available as far as I know other than that ICE experience more fires than EV – which doesn’t say much. Look, I own a Model S, so I’ve got skin the game. At the same time I don’t fall for tall tales from Tesla’s marketing department. I bought it because it’s fun and comfortable to drive and you other tax payers chipped in to help pay for it, made it more affordable. But I also own other vehicles that are much safer.

    Reply
  4. Nope on the first. Of course no one tries to have a crash but you want a car where you are safe in one. Tesla is safe for the size and weight no doubt. If you factor out the rollover risk the Tesla isn’t more or less safer than cars of equal size and weight. But you can have safer car if you go heavier and bigger. A F150 is far safer than a Chevy Volt. The fire hazard? NHTSA doesn’t test for that specifically because the cars tested are prepared not to combust (except for the Volt that burned up after an impact test). The NHTSA so far hasn’t developed tests specifically for battery combustion (e.g. debris punctures) in EV’s. I can’t reconcile your statement that EV’s catch fire less often than ICE – where you compare apples to apples (same year manufactured same number miles driven same situation). Statistics which don’t seem to be available as far as I know other than that ICE experience more fires than EV – which doesn’t say much. Look I own a Model S so I’ve got skin the game. At the same time I don’t fall for tall tales from Tesla’s marketing department. I bought it because it’s fun and comfortable to drive and you other tax payers chipped in to help pay for it made it more affordable. But I also own other vehicles that are much safer.

    Reply
  5. Nope on the first. Of course no one tries to have a crash, but you want a car where you are safe in one. Tesla is safe for the size and weight, no doubt. If you factor out the rollover risk, the Tesla isn’t more or less safer than cars of equal size and weight. But you can have safer car if you go heavier and bigger. A F150 is far safer than a Chevy Volt. The fire hazard? NHTSA doesn’t test for that specifically because the cars tested are prepared not to combust (except for the Volt that burned up after an impact test). The NHTSA so far hasn’t developed tests specifically for battery combustion (e.g., debris punctures) in EV’s. I can’t reconcile your statement that EV’s catch fire less often than ICE – where you compare apples to apples (same year manufactured, same number miles driven, same situation). Statistics which don’t seem to be available as far as I know other than that ICE experience more fires than EV – which doesn’t say much. Look, I own a Model S, so I’ve got skin the game. At the same time I don’t fall for tall tales from Tesla’s marketing department. I bought it because it’s fun and comfortable to drive and you other tax payers chipped in to help pay for it, made it more affordable. But I also own other vehicles that are much safer.

    Reply
  6. Nope on the first. Of course no one tries to have a crash but you want a car where you are safe in one. Tesla is safe for the size and weight no doubt. If you factor out the rollover risk the Tesla isn’t more or less safer than cars of equal size and weight. But you can have safer car if you go heavier and bigger. A F150 is far safer than a Chevy Volt. The fire hazard? NHTSA doesn’t test for that specifically because the cars tested are prepared not to combust (except for the Volt that burned up after an impact test). The NHTSA so far hasn’t developed tests specifically for battery combustion (e.g. debris punctures) in EV’s. I can’t reconcile your statement that EV’s catch fire less often than ICE – where you compare apples to apples (same year manufactured same number miles driven same situation). Statistics which don’t seem to be available as far as I know other than that ICE experience more fires than EV – which doesn’t say much. Look I own a Model S so I’ve got skin the game. At the same time I don’t fall for tall tales from Tesla’s marketing department. I bought it because it’s fun and comfortable to drive and you other tax payers chipped in to help pay for it made it more affordable. But I also own other vehicles that are much safer.

    Reply
  7. BS. Even the NHTSA disputes. “NHTSA does not distinguish safety performance beyond that rating, thus there is no ‘safest’ vehicle among those vehicles achieving five-star ratings.” Reminds me of the early days when Tesla claimed they had a 5.3 star rating (that doesn’t exist). I was wondering because the NHTSA doesn’t do “probability of injury”, but uses a Vehicle Safety Score. So I did a little digging and downloaded the NHTSA’s latest scores for this year on all vehicles tested. I’ll spare you with the scoring system (VSS is the average of 6 Relative Risk Scores that has to do with whether the crash test dummy fared better or worse in crashes from side, rear etc than other vehicles). In the NHTSA datasheet, 92 cars were tested. The Tesla model 3 scored 0.38 (best) and the highest (of the 53 5-star cars) was 0.66 (GMC Terrain) with a mean of 0.59 and you have a whole bunch of cars in this 5-star category (from the Lincoln Navigator at 0.60 to the Honda Accord 0.47). Where the Tesla 3 really excelled is in the rollover RSS. There they scored 0.44, and the Chevy Camaro come close at 0.55. No one else came near this. This is a function of low center of gravity. In terms of front collision, Tesla scored 0.53 but the Ford Mustang was better 0.51 and most 5-star cars were pretty close. In the side barrier RSS (t-bone accident), Tesla scored 0.15, but quite a few cars where better (VW Atlas 0.13, and virtually all the big cars – the F150 scored 0.08 – physics works). So while the safety of the Tesla is very high, it does matter if you think rollover risk is what you are looking for, or whether you want to protect yourself from a 5,000lb vehicle hitting you from the side. Another scoring “issue” is the lack of the “spontaneous combustion” problem that EV’s seems to have when involved in an accident that haven’t been captured in NHTSA testing.

    Reply
  8. BS. Even the NHTSA disputes. NHTSA does not distinguish safety performance beyond that rating” thus there is no ‘safest’ vehicle among those vehicles achieving five-star ratings.”” Reminds me of the early days when Tesla claimed they had a 5.3 star rating (that doesn’t exist). I was wondering because the NHTSA doesn’t do “”””probability of injury”””””” but uses a Vehicle Safety Score. So I did a little digging and downloaded the NHTSA’s latest scores for this year on all vehicles tested. I’ll spare you with the scoring system (VSS is the average of 6 Relative Risk Scores that has to do with whether the crash test dummy fared better or worse in crashes from side rear etc than other vehicles).In the NHTSA datasheet 92 cars were tested. The Tesla model 3 scored 0.38 (best) and the highest (of the 53 5-star cars) was 0.66 (GMC Terrain) with a mean of 0.59 and you have a whole bunch of cars in this 5-star category (from the Lincoln Navigator at 0.60 to the Honda Accord 0.47).Where the Tesla 3 really excelled is in the rollover RSS. There they scored 0.44 and the Chevy Camaro come close at 0.55. No one else came near this. This is a function of low center of gravity. In terms of front collision Tesla scored 0.53 but the Ford Mustang was better 0.51 and most 5-star cars were pretty close. In the side barrier RSS (t-bone accident) Tesla scored 0.15 but quite a few cars where better (VW Atlas 0.13 and virtually all the big cars – the F150 scored 0.08 – physics works).So while the safety of the Tesla is very high it does matter if you think rollover risk is what you are looking for or whether you want to protect yourself from a 5″”000lb vehicle hitting you from the side.Another scoring “”””issue”””” is the lack of the “”””spontaneous combustion”””” problem that EV’s seems to have when involved in an accident that haven’t been captured in NHTSA testing.”””

    Reply
  9. BS. Even the NHTSA disputes. “NHTSA does not distinguish safety performance beyond that rating, thus there is no ‘safest’ vehicle among those vehicles achieving five-star ratings.” Reminds me of the early days when Tesla claimed they had a 5.3 star rating (that doesn’t exist). I was wondering because the NHTSA doesn’t do “probability of injury”, but uses a Vehicle Safety Score. So I did a little digging and downloaded the NHTSA’s latest scores for this year on all vehicles tested. I’ll spare you with the scoring system (VSS is the average of 6 Relative Risk Scores that has to do with whether the crash test dummy fared better or worse in crashes from side, rear etc than other vehicles). In the NHTSA datasheet, 92 cars were tested. The Tesla model 3 scored 0.38 (best) and the highest (of the 53 5-star cars) was 0.66 (GMC Terrain) with a mean of 0.59 and you have a whole bunch of cars in this 5-star category (from the Lincoln Navigator at 0.60 to the Honda Accord 0.47). Where the Tesla 3 really excelled is in the rollover RSS. There they scored 0.44, and the Chevy Camaro come close at 0.55. No one else came near this. This is a function of low center of gravity. In terms of front collision, Tesla scored 0.53 but the Ford Mustang was better 0.51 and most 5-star cars were pretty close. In the side barrier RSS (t-bone accident), Tesla scored 0.15, but quite a few cars where better (VW Atlas 0.13, and virtually all the big cars – the F150 scored 0.08 – physics works). So while the safety of the Tesla is very high, it does matter if you think rollover risk is what you are looking for, or whether you want to protect yourself from a 5,000lb vehicle hitting you from the side. Another scoring “issue” is the lack of the “spontaneous combustion” problem that EV’s seems to have when involved in an accident that haven’t been captured in NHTSA testing.

    Reply
  10. BS. Even the NHTSA disputes. NHTSA does not distinguish safety performance beyond that rating” thus there is no ‘safest’ vehicle among those vehicles achieving five-star ratings.”” Reminds me of the early days when Tesla claimed they had a 5.3 star rating (that doesn’t exist). I was wondering because the NHTSA doesn’t do “”””probability of injury”””””” but uses a Vehicle Safety Score. So I did a little digging and downloaded the NHTSA’s latest scores for this year on all vehicles tested. I’ll spare you with the scoring system (VSS is the average of 6 Relative Risk Scores that has to do with whether the crash test dummy fared better or worse in crashes from side rear etc than other vehicles).In the NHTSA datasheet 92 cars were tested. The Tesla model 3 scored 0.38 (best) and the highest (of the 53 5-star cars) was 0.66 (GMC Terrain) with a mean of 0.59 and you have a whole bunch of cars in this 5-star category (from the Lincoln Navigator at 0.60 to the Honda Accord 0.47).Where the Tesla 3 really excelled is in the rollover RSS. There they scored 0.44 and the Chevy Camaro come close at 0.55. No one else came near this. This is a function of low center of gravity. In terms of front collision Tesla scored 0.53 but the Ford Mustang was better 0.51 and most 5-star cars were pretty close. In the side barrier RSS (t-bone accident) Tesla scored 0.15 but quite a few cars where better (VW Atlas 0.13 and virtually all the big cars – the F150 scored 0.08 – physics works).So while the safety of the Tesla is very high it does matter if you think rollover risk is what you are looking for or whether you want to protect yourself from a 5″”000lb vehicle hitting you from the side.Another scoring “”””issue”””” is the lack of the “”””spontaneous combustion”””” problem that EV’s seems to have when involved in an accident that haven’t been captured in NHTSA testing.”””

    Reply
  11. ” If you factor out the rollover risk, the Tesla isn’t more or less safer than cars of equal size and weight. ” <-- And why factor out rollover risk? So you can falsely poormouth the car. " The fire hazard? NHTSA doesn't test for that specifically " <-- When did I claim they did? You brought up fire risk, and you did so without even looking to see the rate at which they catch fire and more importantly catch fire rapidly enough in a crash so as to prevent rescue of the occupants. They do so far less often than gasoline cars. " which doesn't say much " <- Says a hell of lot. You get a ruptured gas tank and it goes up in a crash, you're flat dead. A battery pack starts to brew up, and you have seconds to minutes to get out of the car. Simply put, they are not seen to explode. " A F150 is far safer than a Chevy Volt." <-- And the Volt is more safe than a Big Wheel. So what? " At the same time I don't fall for tall tales from Tesla's marketing department. " <-- Uhuh. You just lie about them telling tall tales.

    Reply
  12. Nope on the first. Of course no one tries to have a crash, but you want a car where you are safe in one. Tesla is safe for the size and weight, no doubt. If you factor out the rollover risk, the Tesla isn’t more or less safer than cars of equal size and weight. But you can have safer car if you go heavier and bigger. A F150 is far safer than a Chevy Volt.

    The fire hazard? NHTSA doesn’t test for that specifically because the cars tested are prepared not to combust (except for the Volt that burned up after an impact test). The NHTSA so far hasn’t developed tests specifically for battery combustion (e.g., debris punctures) in EV’s. I can’t reconcile your statement that EV’s catch fire less often than ICE – where you compare apples to apples (same year manufactured, same number miles driven, same situation). Statistics which don’t seem to be available as far as I know other than that ICE experience more fires than EV – which doesn’t say much.

    Look, I own a Model S, so I’ve got skin the game. At the same time I don’t fall for tall tales from Tesla’s marketing department. I bought it because it’s fun and comfortable to drive and you other tax payers chipped in to help pay for it, made it more affordable. But I also own other vehicles that are much safer.

    Reply
  13. ” it does matter if you think rollover risk is what you are looking for ” <-- No, it doesn't, because no one is trying to have a crash. " Another scoring "issue" is the lack of the "spontaneous combustion" problem that EV's seems to have when involved in an accident that haven't been captured in NHTSA testing " <-- Except they already catch fire less often than do gasoline vehicles, and when they do they release energy far more slowly. You're here spreading BS.

    Reply
  14. Safety is enabled by the electric drive train. The skateboard architecture gives low centre of gravity and makes for better crumple zones and structural integrity of the passenger cabin.

    Reply
  15. Safety is enabled by the electric drive train. The skateboard architecture gives low centre of gravity and makes for better crumple zones and structural integrity of the passenger cabin.

    Reply
  16. Safety is enabled by the electric drive train. The skateboard architecture gives low centre of gravity and makes for better crumple zones and structural integrity of the passenger cabin.

    Reply
  17. Safety is enabled by the electric drive train. The skateboard architecture gives low centre of gravity and makes for better crumple zones and structural integrity of the passenger cabin.

    Reply
  18. My neighbor just got a Model 3 and I got to take it for a test drive this morning. I tried the “Autopilot” feature twice: once on a country road with a 55mph speed limit and once in bumper to bumper stop and go traffic coming back into town. Personally, I’m not sure I would ever trust it at speed (just me, just personal preference, it worked well). However, in stop and go traffic going 5mph I could see it being a luxury I’d quickly become addicted to.

    Reply
  19. My neighbor just got a Model 3 and I got to take it for a test drive this morning. I tried the Autopilot”” feature twice: once on a country road with a 55mph speed limit and once in bumper to bumper stop and go traffic coming back into town. Personally”” I’m not sure I would ever trust it at speed (just me just personal preference it worked well). However”” in stop and go traffic going 5mph I could see it being a luxury I’d quickly become addicted to.”””

    Reply
  20. My neighbor just got a Model 3 and I got to take it for a test drive this morning. I tried the “Autopilot” feature twice: once on a country road with a 55mph speed limit and once in bumper to bumper stop and go traffic coming back into town. Personally, I’m not sure I would ever trust it at speed (just me, just personal preference, it worked well). However, in stop and go traffic going 5mph I could see it being a luxury I’d quickly become addicted to.

    Reply
  21. My neighbor just got a Model 3 and I got to take it for a test drive this morning. I tried the Autopilot”” feature twice: once on a country road with a 55mph speed limit and once in bumper to bumper stop and go traffic coming back into town. Personally”” I’m not sure I would ever trust it at speed (just me just personal preference it worked well). However”” in stop and go traffic going 5mph I could see it being a luxury I’d quickly become addicted to.”””

    Reply
  22. BS. Even the NHTSA disputes. “NHTSA does not distinguish safety performance beyond that rating, thus there is no ‘safest’ vehicle among those vehicles achieving five-star ratings.” Reminds me of the early days when Tesla claimed they had a 5.3 star rating (that doesn’t exist).

    I was wondering because the NHTSA doesn’t do “probability of injury”, but uses a Vehicle Safety Score. So I did a little digging and downloaded the NHTSA’s latest scores for this year on all vehicles tested. I’ll spare you with the scoring system (VSS is the average of 6 Relative Risk Scores that has to do with whether the crash test dummy fared better or worse in crashes from side, rear etc than other vehicles).

    In the NHTSA datasheet, 92 cars were tested. The Tesla model 3 scored 0.38 (best) and the highest (of the 53 5-star cars) was 0.66 (GMC Terrain) with a mean of 0.59 and you have a whole bunch of cars in this 5-star category (from the Lincoln Navigator at 0.60 to the Honda Accord 0.47).

    Where the Tesla 3 really excelled is in the rollover RSS. There they scored 0.44, and the Chevy Camaro come close at 0.55. No one else came near this. This is a function of low center of gravity. In terms of front collision, Tesla scored 0.53 but the Ford Mustang was better 0.51 and most 5-star cars were pretty close. In the side barrier RSS (t-bone accident), Tesla scored 0.15, but quite a few cars where better (VW Atlas 0.13, and virtually all the big cars – the F150 scored 0.08 – physics works).

    So while the safety of the Tesla is very high, it does matter if you think rollover risk is what you are looking for, or whether you want to protect yourself from a 5,000lb vehicle hitting you from the side.

    Another scoring “issue” is the lack of the “spontaneous combustion” problem that EV’s seems to have when involved in an accident that haven’t been captured in NHTSA testing.

    Reply
  23. OK, I don’t give a fig about it being electric, actually consider it a minus. And I’ve got no use for ludicrous mode. But, safety? I’m now interested.

    Reply
  24. OK I don’t give a fig about it being electric actually consider it a minus. And I’ve got no use for ludicrous mode. But safety? I’m now interested.

    Reply
  25. OK, I don’t give a fig about it being electric, actually consider it a minus. And I’ve got no use for ludicrous mode. But, safety? I’m now interested.

    Reply
  26. OK I don’t give a fig about it being electric actually consider it a minus. And I’ve got no use for ludicrous mode. But safety? I’m now interested.

    Reply
  27. My neighbor just got a Model 3 and I got to take it for a test drive this morning. I tried the “Autopilot” feature twice: once on a country road with a 55mph speed limit and once in bumper to bumper stop and go traffic coming back into town. Personally, I’m not sure I would ever trust it at speed (just me, just personal preference, it worked well). However, in stop and go traffic going 5mph I could see it being a luxury I’d quickly become addicted to.

    Reply

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