Microsoft Can Control 50,000 Qubits But Large Qubit System Still Must be Made

Microsoft’s Quantum Lab located at the University of Sydney made breakthroughs in qubit control technology that allow us to scale beyond the physical limitations of current conventional systems. They now have the ability to control up to 50,000 qubits through simply three wires, a cryogenic CMOS design, and a 1cm2 chip computing at near absolute zero temperatures.

Leading cryptographers at Microsoft Research are developing quantum-resistant public-key cryptographic algorithms and protocols to prepare customers and data centers around the world for a quantum future.

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Today in Orlando, Florida, Microsoft chief executive officer Satya Nadella said that the technology company had developed a “full-stack, open cloud ecosystem” to bring the benefits of quantum computing to developers and organizations around the world.

Behind this announcement is an engineering development at the Microsoft Quantum Lab Sydney, led by Scientific Director and Professor at the University of Sydney, David Reilly.

Professor Reilly is available to explain what is behind the announcement.

Microsoft said that it had made breakthroughs in qubit control technology at its Quantum Laboratory at the University of Sydney. Qubits are the building blocks of quantum computers.

These breakthroughs in quantum engineering “allow us to scale beyond the physical limitations of current systems. We now have the ability to control up to 50,000 qubits through simply three wires, a cryogenic CMOS design, and a 1cm2 chip computing near absolute zero temperatures”, according to a statement by Microsoft.

The device developed at Sydney is ‘hardware agnostic’, meaning it is built to work with any type of quantum computing hardware.

Professor Reilly said: “It’s fair to say the chip we have developed is one of the most sophisticated micro-devices ever made. It has miniaturized the complex support networks that are making early-stage quantum computers possible. This means the next step, which is to scale-up to devices that actually solve real-world problems, enters the realm of possibility.”

SOURCES- University of Sydney, Microsoft
Written By Brian Wang, Nextbigfuture.com

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