Korean Fusion Tokomak Project applies additional magnetic fields to prevent a type of instability

Korean Fusion tokamak fusion reactor scientists have determined additional magnetic field can avoid a difficult plasma instability.

Nature – 3D field phase-space control in tokamak plasmas

Abstract
A small relaxation of the axisymmetric magnetic field of a tokamak into a non-axisymmetric three-dimensional (3D) configuration can be effective to control magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, such as edge-localized modes. However, a major challenge to the concept of 3D tokamaks is that there are virtually unlimited possible choices for a 3D magnetic field, and most of them will only destabilize or degrade plasmas by symmetry breaking. Here, we demonstrate the phase-space visualization of the full 3D field-operating windows of a tokamak, which allows us to predict which configurations will maintain high confinement without magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in an entire region of plasmas. We test our approach at the Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) facility, whose 3D coils with many degrees of freedom in the coil space make it unique for this purpose. Our experiments show that only a small subset of coil configurations can accomplish edge-localized mode suppression without terminating the discharge with core magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, as predicted by the perturbative 3D expansion of plasma equilibrium and the optimizing principle of local resonance. The prediction provided excellent guidance, implying that our method can substantially improve the efficiency and fidelity of the 3D optimization process in tokamaks.

25 thoughts on “Korean Fusion Tokomak Project applies additional magnetic fields to prevent a type of instability”

  1. ITER looks to be barely big enough to become a reactor that actually generates power. You need something on the order of a meter of lithium metal or salt between the fusion reactions & delicate stuff like superconducting coils, to absorb the high energy neutrons & generate both tritium for keeping the reaction going & heat to run turbine generators. What would be the minor radius of the reaction region? Would a meter be enough?

    Reply
  2. ITER looks to be barely big enough to become a reactor that actually generates power. You need something on the order of a meter of lithium metal or salt between the fusion reactions & delicate stuff like superconducting coils to absorb the high energy neutrons & generate both tritium for keeping the reaction going & heat to run turbine generators.What would be the minor radius of the reaction region? Would a meter be enough?

    Reply
  3. Agreed. Have been following fusion for something like 30 years. Once it gets here we will all realize that it is too expensive and can’t compete. Gen IV fission is the better path forward (barring some breakthrough in alt-fusion).

    Reply
  4. Agreed. Have been following fusion for something like 30 years.Once it gets here we will all realize that it is too expensive and can’t compete.Gen IV fission is the better path forward (barring some breakthrough in alt-fusion).

    Reply
  5. Agreed. Have been following fusion for something like 30 years. Once it gets here we will all realize that it is too expensive and can’t compete. Gen IV fission is the better path forward (barring some breakthrough in alt-fusion).

    Reply
  6. Agreed. Have been following fusion for something like 30 years.Once it gets here we will all realize that it is too expensive and can’t compete.Gen IV fission is the better path forward (barring some breakthrough in alt-fusion).

    Reply
  7. Agreed. Have been following fusion for something like 30 years.

    Once it gets here we will all realize that it is too expensive and can’t compete.

    Gen IV fission is the better path forward (barring some breakthrough in alt-fusion).

    Reply
  8. ITER looks to be barely big enough to become a reactor that actually generates power. You need something on the order of a meter of lithium metal or salt between the fusion reactions & delicate stuff like superconducting coils, to absorb the high energy neutrons & generate both tritium for keeping the reaction going & heat to run turbine generators. What would be the minor radius of the reaction region? Would a meter be enough?

    Reply
  9. ITER looks to be barely big enough to become a reactor that actually generates power. You need something on the order of a meter of lithium metal or salt between the fusion reactions & delicate stuff like superconducting coils to absorb the high energy neutrons & generate both tritium for keeping the reaction going & heat to run turbine generators.What would be the minor radius of the reaction region? Would a meter be enough?

    Reply
  10. ITER looks to be barely big enough to become a reactor that actually generates power. You need something on the order of a meter of lithium metal or salt between the fusion reactions & delicate stuff like superconducting coils, to absorb the high energy neutrons & generate both tritium for keeping the reaction going & heat to run turbine generators.
    What would be the minor radius of the reaction region? Would a meter be enough?

    Reply

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