Ovzon fourth client SpaceX Falcon Heavy launches

Swedish company, Ovzon, has entered into an agreement with SpaceX for launch of Ovzon’s first GEO satellite. The launch is expected to take place no earlier than Q4 2020. The next step for the company is to finalize the procurement of the satellites.

Per Wahlberg, CEO Ovzon said:

Contracting the launch supplier of the first Ovzon satellite is an important and exciting step for our company. SpaceX offered a very competitive solution with the Falcon Heavy launch vehicle which will gain us access to space in a timely and reliable manner. The satellite is expected to be launched no earlier than Q4 2020. The procurement of the satellites is now also in the final stage. Earlier this month we ordered and started the manufacturing of the first Ovzon On-Board-Processor (OBP), one of the most advanced of its type. They continue to work towards the goal of revolutionizing mobile broadband via satellite by offering the highest data-rates through the smallest terminals.

Ovzon’s commitment is the fourth commercial contract secured by Falcon Heavy in 2019 and 2020.

“We are honored that Ovzon has chosen SpaceX to launch the first of its satellites,” said SpaceX’s President and COO, Gwynne Shotwell. “We look forward to working closely on the execution of this important direct-to-GEO mission.”

The Ovzon solution offers speeds up to 80 times faster than competing offerings.

The next generation Ovzon service is based on complete end-to-end proprietary components and patented technology. Ovzon-3 will significantly increase service performance.

The company has offices in Stockholm, Sweden and Bethesda, Maryland and Tampa, Florida in the United States.

25 thoughts on “Ovzon fourth client SpaceX Falcon Heavy launches”

  1. And Musk is launching his own satellite network that will most likely reduce profitability for competitors like Ovzon. The SpaceX Starlink constellation is planned to start limited operation in 2020 and be built out by 2025-ish. Being in LEO, it has a latency advantage that can’t be worked around by GEO operators.

    Reply
  2. And Musk is launching his own satellite network that will most likely reduce profitability for competitors like Ovzon. The SpaceX Starlink constellation is planned to start limited operation in 2020 and be built out by 2025-ish. Being in LEO it has a latency advantage that can’t be worked around by GEO operators.

    Reply
  3. The logistics of this will be interesting to behold, to say the least. Launching that many satellites surely needs to reflect on their launch manifest. For F9 and Falcon Heavy. But does it? are they scheduling the launches yet?

    Reply
  4. The logistics of this will be interesting to behold to say the least.Launching that many satellites surely needs to reflect on their launch manifest. For F9 and Falcon Heavy.But does it? are they scheduling the launches yet?

    Reply
  5. The interesting thing is that it gives SpaceX a money making, or at least break even, way to guarantee they’re launching on a regular basis. This means they’re accumulating data on a regular basis, they can risk refurbished rockets without pissing off paying customers, and see how they do, they can tweak control algorithms, test heat protection systems. This gives them a huge advantage over the competition in testing and improving their tech. Actual rocket tests are a rare event for their competitors. For SpaceX, they’ll be getting test results on a weekly basis.

    Reply
  6. The interesting thing is that it gives SpaceX a money making or at least break even way to guarantee they’re launching on a regular basis. This means they’re accumulating data on a regular basis they can risk refurbished rockets without pissing off paying customers and see how they do they can tweak control algorithms test heat protection systems.This gives them a huge advantage over the competition in testing and improving their tech. Actual rocket tests are a rare event for their competitors. For SpaceX they’ll be getting test results on a weekly basis.

    Reply
  7. The first three missions booked for Falcon Heavy: U.S. Air Force STP-2 Arabsat 6A U.S. Air Force AFSPC-52 (classified payload) Ovzon is the fourth firm contract for FH, and just a couple weeks later, FH signed its fifth firm contract for Viasat-3.

    Reply
  8. The first three missions booked for Falcon Heavy:U.S. Air Force STP-2Arabsat 6AU.S. Air Force AFSPC-52 (classified payload)Ovzon is the fourth firm contract for FH and just a couple weeks later FH signed its fifth firm contract for Viasat-3.

    Reply
  9. The first three missions booked for Falcon Heavy: U.S. Air Force STP-2 Arabsat 6A U.S. Air Force AFSPC-52 (classified payload) Ovzon is the fourth firm contract for FH, and just a couple weeks later, FH signed its fifth firm contract for Viasat-3.

    Reply
  10. The first three missions booked for Falcon Heavy:U.S. Air Force STP-2Arabsat 6AU.S. Air Force AFSPC-52 (classified payload)Ovzon is the fourth firm contract for FH and just a couple weeks later FH signed its fifth firm contract for Viasat-3.

    Reply
  11. The first three missions booked for Falcon Heavy:

    U.S. Air Force STP-2

    Arabsat 6A

    U.S. Air Force AFSPC-52 (classified payload)

    Ovzon is the fourth firm contract for FH, and just a couple weeks later, FH signed its fifth firm contract for Viasat-3.

    Reply
  12. The interesting thing is that it gives SpaceX a money making, or at least break even, way to guarantee they’re launching on a regular basis. This means they’re accumulating data on a regular basis, they can risk refurbished rockets without pissing off paying customers, and see how they do, they can tweak control algorithms, test heat protection systems. This gives them a huge advantage over the competition in testing and improving their tech. Actual rocket tests are a rare event for their competitors. For SpaceX, they’ll be getting test results on a weekly basis.

    Reply
  13. The interesting thing is that it gives SpaceX a money making or at least break even way to guarantee they’re launching on a regular basis. This means they’re accumulating data on a regular basis they can risk refurbished rockets without pissing off paying customers and see how they do they can tweak control algorithms test heat protection systems.This gives them a huge advantage over the competition in testing and improving their tech. Actual rocket tests are a rare event for their competitors. For SpaceX they’ll be getting test results on a weekly basis.

    Reply
  14. The logistics of this will be interesting to behold, to say the least. Launching that many satellites surely needs to reflect on their launch manifest. For F9 and Falcon Heavy. But does it? are they scheduling the launches yet?

    Reply
  15. The logistics of this will be interesting to behold to say the least.Launching that many satellites surely needs to reflect on their launch manifest. For F9 and Falcon Heavy.But does it? are they scheduling the launches yet?

    Reply
  16. And Musk is launching his own satellite network that will most likely reduce profitability for competitors like Ovzon. The SpaceX Starlink constellation is planned to start limited operation in 2020 and be built out by 2025-ish. Being in LEO, it has a latency advantage that can’t be worked around by GEO operators.

    Reply
  17. And Musk is launching his own satellite network that will most likely reduce profitability for competitors like Ovzon. The SpaceX Starlink constellation is planned to start limited operation in 2020 and be built out by 2025-ish. Being in LEO it has a latency advantage that can’t be worked around by GEO operators.

    Reply
  18. The interesting thing is that it gives SpaceX a money making, or at least break even, way to guarantee they’re launching on a regular basis. This means they’re accumulating data on a regular basis, they can risk refurbished rockets without pissing off paying customers, and see how they do, they can tweak control algorithms, test heat protection systems.

    This gives them a huge advantage over the competition in testing and improving their tech. Actual rocket tests are a rare event for their competitors. For SpaceX, they’ll be getting test results on a weekly basis.

    Reply
  19. The logistics of this will be interesting to behold, to say the least.

    Launching that many satellites surely needs to reflect on their launch manifest. For F9 and Falcon Heavy.

    But does it? are they scheduling the launches yet?

    Reply
  20. And Musk is launching his own satellite network that will most likely reduce profitability for competitors like Ovzon. The SpaceX Starlink constellation is planned to start limited operation in 2020 and be built out by 2025-ish. Being in LEO, it has a latency advantage that can’t be worked around by GEO operators.

    Reply

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