Cybertruck Beats Rivian and Ford on Price, Range and Other Specifications

The Cybertruck pickup bed is 2 feet longer than the Rivian and it is one foot longer overall.

230.9 inches long and sports a 149.9-inch wheelbase with a 6.5-foot-long, 57-inch-wide bed out back. The Rivian is 217.1 inches long overall and has a 135.8 in wheelbase with a 4.5 foot-long bed behind it.

The Cybertruck should be able to tow a maximum of 14,000 pounds and Rivian R1T will have a max tow capacity of 11,000 pounds. The Telsa Cybertruck (3,350 pounds) will almost double the Max payload capacities of the Rivian (1,760 pounds).

Rivian R1T 180 kW-hr battery will have 400 miles of range.
Rivian R1T 105 kW-hr battery will get 230 miles of range.
Ford Mustang Mach-e 210 miles to 300 miles of range on a full charge.
Ford Mustang Mach-e will start at $43,895 and the top-line model cost roughly $60,500 for the GT.
Tesla Cybertruck will get 250 to over 500 miles.
The entry-level Mustang Mach-E with a $7,500 tax credit starts at $36,395.

Rivian 160 Kw will charge the 180 kW-hr truck from five to 80 percent in about 50 minutes.
The V3 Supercharger 250kw charged a compatible Model 3 from 5 to 90 percent in 37 minutes.

The Cybertruck powertrain will make around 690 hp and 824 lb-ft of torque.
Ford Mustang Mach-e will have about 459 horsepower and 612 lb.-ft. of torque.

Rivian claims less than three seconds to 60 mph.
Tesla tri-motor Cybertruck will hit that speed in 2.9 seconds.
Ford Mustang Mach-e will be about 3.5 seconds for 0 to 60 mph.

The quickest truck MotorTrend has ever tested was the 2008 Toyota TRD Supercharged and got to 60 mph in 4.8 seconds.

The Rivian R1T is going to start at around $69,000. Tesla Cybertruck will start at $39,900 and go up to $69,900.

Ford F-150 2020

The Ford F-150 MSRP starts at $28,495
Towing capacity: 5,000 to 8,000 lbs.
MPG: Up to 22 city / 30 highway
Horsepower: 250 to 450 hp
Engine: 2.7 L V6, 3.0 L V6 diesel, 3.3 L V6, 3.5 L V6, 5.0 L V8

47 thoughts on “Cybertruck Beats Rivian and Ford on Price, Range and Other Specifications”

  1. That opportunity cost really matters. If you’re poor and only can get credit on a 20% credit card, buying the Corolla makes a lot more sense than if you can get 3% on a credit card rollover on your $20k limit card.

    Most people’s opportunity cost is return on S&P 500 minus top marginal tax rate. So like 5%.

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  2. Let be honest though, most of the preorders are by people who don’t actually need a truck the majority of the time. Those that do, will likely prefer the Rivian for the simple reason that existing truck bed accessories and shelving will fit unmodified. Cybertruck will likely require all new custom accessories, increasing the price of work cabinets and fittings to make it a work truck for working folk (independent contractors). While those contractors are certainly willing buy something expensive if it is worthwhile, the cost/performance of a Rivian with conventional accessories beats a Cybertruck on an subjective measure.

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  3. That’s true, the site really doesn’t go over it in great detail.

    Here’s a good Motortrend article that goes over the design a bit. it’s a publication so the article might be biased to some degree I would imagine and with the limited information from Tesla they might be making assumptions as well.

    https://www.motortrend.com/news/tesla-cybertruck-electric-pickup-engineering-manufacturing/

    I do hope more details come out from Tesla’s mouth on the design and all other specs soon since I’m interested myself in purchasing at some point.

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  4. What about the opportunity cost on the up front fuel money? If you just invest it in Tesla stock for those same three years, you should be a multi-millionaire!

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  5. Old age does strange things to the mind. You should have her checked out. Totally kidding of course, but you should have her checked out if she likes this thing.

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  6. go read about the frame-less designs choices that are listed out on the Tesla website

    Can you provide a link? I can’t find more detail than 2 sentences, no more information than Brian has supplied here.

    Is there actually any more to “frameless design” than standard monocoque construction that has been used in sedans since the 1950s?

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  7. And that’s normal automotive glass. Ballistic glass is probably more difficult to curve, going on how armoured cars usually have flat sheets in their windows.

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  8. Aren’t you in the business of making and selling electricity? You should celebrate electric vehicles the way a Saudi oilman likes huge V8s

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  9. Think of an EV as buying a lot of the fuel up front (the battery) for a big overall savings over the years.

    So one that has a very depleted battery may sell for $2000 used, or one that uses a leased battery model.

    If an old EV saves me $1200 a year over the old Corolla in fuel and maintenance, pencil that out over 3 years…yeah the price of old EVs will hold their value dramatically better.

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  10. My wife and I are both 70 and neither of us have ever been interested in pickup trucks in our lives. However, just because it’s Tesla’s latest big thing, I’ve found myself listening to HyperChange and friends speculate about design and specs and all the comparisons with other trucks for weeks now. Totally fascinated. So both wife and I watched the big roll-out, me with bated breath. My first thought on seeing it was it’s such a masculine design that she’ll hate it. (She spends her time on very feminine little DIY craft projects, using doilies and ribbon and buttons and so on, and watching relationship movies.) But immediately she said, “I LIKE it!!” How’s that for an unexpected backing? So she’s definitely throwing her weight behind it. Not that there’s much to throw. Same here.

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  11. informal count before hand; confirmed 150k as of Sat afternoon. Extrapolate to market open on monday for Hedge funds to trade on the news.

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  12. I could be happy with the styling, and definitely with the performance. And I don’t mind the shape of the tray.
    But the tray is just too short. Much shorter than my current ute. 5 years ago that would be a showstopper, but these days I don’t carry the bigger stuff any more, so I could probably get over it.
    I’d still much prefer a single row of seats and much longer tray though.

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  13. But people will know what you are driving,

    Good point. There is a reason the Prius has kept the same dumpy shape for multiple redesigns: because you want everyone to know that you are driving a Prius.

    Same reason the Rolls Royce is still using the same radiator shape as the 1904 model.

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  14. I could see it just being more of a niche vehicle but who knows? I’m a 3rd gen Tacoma owner and the mod community and aftermarket products that are available would surprise you. I guess what I’m saying is that people will find a way to utilize this truck however they want if they like the truck enough to buy it.

    Are you implying Musk is high and mighty? I’m not sure I would agree but I also don’t know him personally. He seemed to take that surprise mishap in stride though. Hopefully that will make him think twice about performing on stage a demo like that the next time.

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  15. I’ve been thinking about evs. Despite the enormous progress we’ve seen in the last decade, will we ever see the day when we can pick up a second hand ev for 2k?

    3 years ago I bought a 2004 corolla for 2200. It had 140k miles on the clock. It has now done 160k and it keeps on going.

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  16. I buy trucks. I haul my sxs, atvs, camper, firewood, etc. with them. I would love to have an electric truck. But gosh that thing is ugly. Maybe they’ll change it or it will grow on me.

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  17. It depends on the trade. I can definitely see this being a supervisor’s vehicle for the last electrical contractor I worked for – useful for carrying employees, tools, and material to out of town jobs. Same for plumbing, HVAC, fire protection, and several others.

    But possibly not for carpenters or drywallers, unless with a trailer, and probably not for road crews or others that regularly haul gritty loads that could jam up that tail gate ramp.

    The integrated power outlets and air compressor will be selling points for some trades. Air powered tools, anyone? Auto mechanics will like that.

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  18. It’s obviously got it’s strong points but it also has some weak points. For instance this is never going to be a work truck for those in the building trades but for somebody that want to just tow stuff it looks quite viable.

    PS, it was a hoot that the glass broke and it never bores me to see the high and mighty get egg on their face. 😉

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  19. Conspiracy theory time: Maybe shaping the stainless steel with complex curves would cost too much, so that no matter what they showed, if it was affordable to make, people were going to criticise the looks. So Tesla deliberately made this truck so ugly that when they later improve it somewhat everyone will say how great it looks.

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  20. A long wheelbase is not good (for several reasons) for going off-road. Give me an EUV designed by Jeep with that 500 mile range battery and I’ll show something that is.

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  21. Man, so many opinions. Some legitimate and some ridiculous and ignorant.

    I for one, like the truck. I’ve found many other folks are starting to like it as well. It sorta grows on you once you get past the unusual design.

    I would suggest all of you that don’t understand why they chose this design, go read about the frame-less designs choices that are listed out on the Tesla website.

    The stats are very impressive. Hopefully they stay and don’t change much for the production model. Also, a video was released of them testing the glass right before the show. The video shows that the ball bearing didn’t break the glass. I assume that after the multiple successful tests, the glass developed micro fractures and that last throw was the last straw before it broke. Oh well, it was still a good demonstration of the tech.

    It’s fine to not like it and it’s also fine to love it. Life is subjective and everyone has their own tastes. I would suggest that some of the “Not like” people tone down their opinions a notch or two. They’re starting to look childish and misinformed.

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  22. Come on quit picking on Little Caesars, in a pinch is Ok pizza. But you are right, that is one ugly truck. But people will know what you are driving,

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  23. I think that’s partly why they went with this styling. If it were a pretty truck, those people would think of it as a play truck for wimpy treehuggers. It’s going to be hard to feel that way about this raw steel post-apocalyptic nightmare of a vehicle.

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  24. Fugly pickup. Never thought an electric pickup would appeal to people who buy pickups. They are against anything that’s green. The kind of people who turn their pickups into smokers. A pickup with electric engines would have a lot of traction and pulling power. Would be great if you needed a heavy duty pickup.

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  25. This is the future. It is an amazing vehicle and going by Tesla’s record it will be amazing to drive. The radical design is a hit on other car makers who have just followed the heard and not thought of anything different. This is no doubt the best I have seen in my lifetime.

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  26. The incorporation of the new battery technology they just bought will allow a 20% reduction in current battery tech. That assumes they do not improve the cost and capabilities over the next 1 1/2 years.

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  27. Little Caesar’s pizza beats other pizza in terms of size, cost, and toppings. It still sucks. TSLA being down 6% after the Fuglymobile launch is what investors think of it. Oh, and I don’t have to give Ford an interest free loan to pump up their operating capital while I wait for a truck that will be delayed like every other car Tesla launches. And, all those specs will inevitable change. Just like the “bullet-proof” glass was until it wasn’t.

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  28. That is styling extremism bordering on terrorism. I would like to see what happens in a frontal collision with an F-Series. Let the games begin.

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  29. Huh, I guess I was looking at a higher version of the f150..I remember the base price being like…$50k. oh well, I’d still say the electric is worth its weight from the ease of self-driving alone. I do wonder how the machine learning will learn control for trailer steering which adds significant PID dampening challenge.

    Let us also remember the original model X reveal was fairly radical as well ( not as radical as this), no rear view mirrors etc.. I think the final tweaks may make for a slightly more svelte profile design.

    I personally like the rearview mirror delete, I think regulation probably prevents this and maybe Tesla is fighting to get an exception.

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  30. I love it, too.

    That doesn’t mean they can build it. Still waiting for the $35k model 3. The cheapest 3 you can actually buy is $40k. The truck is a lot bigger and has more battery. It is hard to imagine they can build them for $40k.

    It will make Ford and Chevy look silly when they announce their $60k trucks with less than 250 miles of range.

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