Philippines will be World Bank upper-middle income in 2019

The Philippines National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA) sees 7-8% GDP growth making the Philippines an upper middle-income country by 2019 which would be 3 years ahead of a 2022 target.

A World Bank definition for an upper middle-income economy is a country with a GNI per capita of between $4,036 and $12,475.

The Philippines, Indonesia, Vietnam, India, Laos and Myanmar are lower middle-income country with GNI per capita between $1,026 and $4,035.

The 2017 World Bank statistics on per capita GNI are:

Philippines $3660
Indonesia   $3540
Laos        $2270
Vietnam     $2170
India       $1820
Myanmar     $1190

The South Asian countries have 5 to 8% GDP growth.

Philippines having 7-8% growth should reach the upper middle-income level in 2019. Indonesia has a little slower growth at 5.5% and should reach it around 2022.

India, Vietnam and Laos will become upper middle-income around 2026-2030.

China became upper middle income around 2010 and will soon become high income according to the world bank definitions.

Regional 2017 per capita GNI

World                        $10,366	
Arab World                         $6,152	
Caribbean small states             $8,985	
Central Europe and the Baltics    $12,980	
East Asia & Pacific               $10,170	
Euro area                         $35,644	
Europe & Central Asia             $22,651	
Europe & Central Asia (excluding high income) $7,370	
European Union                    $32,778		
Latin America & Caribbean          $8,200	
Latin America & Caribbean (excluding high income) $7,413

40 thoughts on “Philippines will be World Bank upper-middle income in 2019”

  1. I think not. Manila has a long history of screwing economic progress up…usually via high inflation from printing too many pesos. The real progress I have seen is technological-based. Filipinos enjoy far better wireless internet at cheaper rates than their US counterparts do, for example. Even in the rural areas like my wife’s hometown in Mindanao.

    Reply
  2. Cool, that would please my wife. Not that it’s going to change the fact that, once you get out of the cities, they’re dirt poor. Tremendous income inequality there.

    Reply
  3. I think not. Manila has a long history of screwing economic progress up…usually via high inflation from printing too many pesos. The real progress I have seen is technological-based. Filipinos enjoy far better wireless internet at cheaper rates than their US counterparts do for example. Even in the rural areas like my wife’s hometown in Mindanao.

    Reply
  4. Cool that would please my wife. Not that it’s going to change the fact that once you get out of the cities they’re dirt poor. Tremendous income inequality there.

    Reply
  5. Heh, I recall when I flew there to meet my now wife; My brother, thanks to his job, gets intelligence briefings, and was scared spitless at the idea I was going there. “If I have to sell my house to ransom you, I’ll kill you myself when you get home!” But it’s not so bad around Cagayan. You couldn’t get me to visit Davao, though.

    Reply
  6. My wife was born in Cagayan. She grew up across the bay in Oroquieta City, where her family still lives. I couldn’t go visit a few years ago because of risk of kidnapping. I might go later this year/early next year tho. bit.ly/2phDkyb

    Reply
  7. Heh I recall when I flew there to meet my now wife; My brother thanks to his job gets intelligence briefings and was scared spitless at the idea I was going there. If I have to sell my house to ransom you”” I’ll kill you myself when you get home!””But it’s not so bad around Cagayan. You couldn’t get me to visit Davao”””” though.”””

    Reply
  8. My wife was born in Cagayan. She grew up across the bay in Oroquieta City where her family still lives. I couldn’t go visit a few years ago because of risk of kidnapping. I might go later this year/early next year tho.bit.ly/2phDkyb

    Reply
  9. This may eventually happen but it won’t be soon. I foresee a global recession happening within the next year or two, So this result be get push back five to ten years from now.

    Reply
  10. This may eventually happen but it won’t be soon. I foresee a global recession happening within the next year or two So this result be get push back five to ten years from now.

    Reply
  11. This may eventually happen but it won’t be soon. I foresee a global recession happening within the next year or two, So this result be get push back five to ten years from now.

    Reply
  12. This may eventually happen but it won’t be soon. I foresee a global recession happening within the next year or two So this result be get push back five to ten years from now.

    Reply
  13. Heh, I recall when I flew there to meet my now wife; My brother, thanks to his job, gets intelligence briefings, and was scared spitless at the idea I was going there. “If I have to sell my house to ransom you, I’ll kill you myself when you get home!” But it’s not so bad around Cagayan. You couldn’t get me to visit Davao, though.

    Reply
  14. Heh I recall when I flew there to meet my now wife; My brother thanks to his job gets intelligence briefings and was scared spitless at the idea I was going there. If I have to sell my house to ransom you”” I’ll kill you myself when you get home!””But it’s not so bad around Cagayan. You couldn’t get me to visit Davao”””” though.”””

    Reply
  15. My wife was born in Cagayan. She grew up across the bay in Oroquieta City, where her family still lives. I couldn’t go visit a few years ago because of risk of kidnapping. I might go later this year/early next year tho. bit.ly/2phDkyb

    Reply
  16. My wife was born in Cagayan. She grew up across the bay in Oroquieta City where her family still lives. I couldn’t go visit a few years ago because of risk of kidnapping. I might go later this year/early next year tho.bit.ly/2phDkyb

    Reply
  17. I think not. Manila has a long history of screwing economic progress up…usually via high inflation from printing too many pesos. The real progress I have seen is technological-based. Filipinos enjoy far better wireless internet at cheaper rates than their US counterparts do, for example. Even in the rural areas like my wife’s hometown in Mindanao.

    Reply
  18. I think not. Manila has a long history of screwing economic progress up…usually via high inflation from printing too many pesos. The real progress I have seen is technological-based. Filipinos enjoy far better wireless internet at cheaper rates than their US counterparts do for example. Even in the rural areas like my wife’s hometown in Mindanao.

    Reply
  19. Cool, that would please my wife. Not that it’s going to change the fact that, once you get out of the cities, they’re dirt poor. Tremendous income inequality there.

    Reply
  20. Cool that would please my wife. Not that it’s going to change the fact that once you get out of the cities they’re dirt poor. Tremendous income inequality there.

    Reply
  21. Heh, I recall when I flew there to meet my now wife; My brother, thanks to his job, gets intelligence briefings, and was scared spitless at the idea I was going there. “If I have to sell my house to ransom you, I’ll kill you myself when you get home!”

    But it’s not so bad around Cagayan. You couldn’t get me to visit Davao, though.

    Reply
  22. My wife was born in Cagayan. She grew up across the bay in Oroquieta City, where her family still lives. I couldn’t go visit a few years ago because of risk of kidnapping. I might go later this year/early next year tho.

    bit.ly/2phDkyb

    Reply
  23. I think not.

    Manila has a long history of screwing economic progress up…usually via high inflation from printing too many pesos.

    The real progress I have seen is technological-based. Filipinos enjoy far better wireless internet at cheaper rates than their US counterparts do, for example. Even in the rural areas like my wife’s hometown in Mindanao.

    Reply

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