Tesla Will Soon Be Able to Self-Drive from Home to Work and Obey Traffic Lights

Tesla’s self-driving autopilot is already testing driving with traffic lights, stop signs and roundabouts. Your Tesla will soon be able to go from your garage at home to parking at work with no driver input at all.

23 thoughts on “Tesla Will Soon Be Able to Self-Drive from Home to Work and Obey Traffic Lights”

  1. Well i’d think that if it comes down to plowing in to a vehicle or stopping that the self driving car should choose to stop. You know, fewer deaths that way and all that.

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  2. Whistleblower: Uber Could Have Prevented Self-Driving Fatality

    Uber execs reportedly ignored his emailed warnings.

    Fatal Mistake

    An email could have saved Elaine Herzberg’s life.

    On March 18, one of Uber’s self-driving cars struck and killed the 49-year-old Arizona woman — the first known example of a self-driving fatality.

    According to a disturbing report published by The Information on Monday, an Uber employee sent an email warning several of the company’s higher-ups that something was amiss with the self-driving vehicles and their human handlers — a warning those execs appeared to have ignored.

    Message Sent

    Robbie Miller used to be a manager in Uber’s testing-operations group. On March 13, he sent an email to seven of the company’s lawyers and executives, including Eric Meyhofer, the head of its autonomous vehicle unit.

    In that email, Miller warned that Uber’s self-driving cars were routinely involved in damage-causing accidents, usually due to either “poor behavior of the operator or the AV technology.”

    He also noted that others at the company seemed to either ignore these incidents or take unreasonably long to respond to them. “This is not how we should be operating,” Miller wrote.

    Full: https://futurism.com/self-driving-fatality-preventable-uber

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  3. No, because he is not only saying what you are pretending he is only saying. Your pretending that is a lie on your part — or delusion on your part.

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  4. Which is why I wrote –> ” that the driver acknowledges they are to be able to take control at any time and are legally responsible for where the vehicle goes and what it does, should remain policy from the carmaker and probably should be law. “

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  5. I’ll believe this after it’s been doing it safely in real world conditions for many thousands of hours. Personally, I don’t think this will happen for another 5 years at the very best.

    Differentiating between stopped cars and street signs, trees, etc. is still a big issue, and detecting motion alongside the road (pedestrians, pets, wild animals) is just as important. When can you ignore debris, like a blowing plastic bag, and when will it be likely to take out your tires? The real world is a messy place, and even if overall they can eventually make it safer than a human, people will be quick to criticize any basic errors.

    My wife just got a new car with lane detection, and it’s neat, but it loses track of the lanes when going straight thru a simple intersection. It needs good consistent paint at all times, it’s not going to guess based on grooves or paint remnants or distance from oncoming cars, etc. Presumably Tesla is ahead of that, but they’d have to be a long way ahead of that to just stay in the proper lane when going thru a varied city environment, forget about not hitting objects.

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  6. As far as I recall, the main problem with self driving in general and Tesla self drive in particular is that it performs badly in poor weather conditions . Rain, snow, etc. severely impair auto drive abilities to perform.
    I am wondering whether this problem is solved otherwise tech may work only or California where it is sunny for 350 days a year

    Luca Mazza

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  7. Teslas don’t use LIDARs so until Tesla decides to spend a few more bucks there is probably no way to avoid these kind of failures.

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  8. As far as I know, dubious lane marking can cause Teslas to swerve off the roas like what happened on the 101 not too long ago. God only knows what would happen when a Tesla had to guess where the road was in snowy conditions (I grew up in Colorado and that’s a real skill that you need when you drive in the snow.)

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  9. Somebody is going to take what he says seriously and get themselves or someone else killed. There is little evidence that his cars can do this safely and consistently regardless of the environment or road conditions.

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  10. Anyone can park in the shoulder of the fast lane. Most people will be risking a ticket, but that’s not going to make them any softer when you run into them.

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  11. For the next, next update the Tesla will monitor you and when you fall asleep will route the Police to you so that they can deliver you a ticket and impound your vehicle.

    The next, next, next update will feature advanced AI that puts you to sleep.

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  12. Slightly more important question: Will the Tesla not plow in to firetrucks at full speed? SO far that’s happened twice because Teslas don’t seem to understand that fire trucks can park in the shoulder of the fast lane.

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  13. And after a drunk guy was found sleeping in autopilot, and police had to chase him a long distance before the car got a clue and stopped, the auto-pilot will detect nearby police cars and auto-deliver you to the authorities.

    The next update will be better (for the cops) as there won’t be any need of being anywhere near you. Just send the electronic arrest warrant and the car will lock itself and abduct you whenever you board it.

    Ah, the joys of science and progress.

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  14. ” Your Tesla will soon be able to go from your garage at home to parking at work with no driver input at all. ” <– In routes exemplifying the theoretically perfect (or good enough) conditions it is tested for. That Tesla requires in writing when sold and when Autopilot is engaged, that the driver acknowledges they are to be able to take control at any time and are legally responsible for where the vehicle goes and what it does, should remain policy from the carmaker and probably should be law.

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