Mice given dasatinib-quercitin lived 36% longer and in better health

Mayo Clinic anti-aging researcher James Kirkland published about a drug combination that can slow and reverse senescent cells in mice.

A leukemia drug dasatinib and the dietary supplement quercetin reduced senescent cells’ numbers, tamped down the inflammation they cause, and reduced the level of disability that comes with age-related diseases.

The drugs delayed age-related diseases. And the anti-aging effects of a single five-day course of the cocktail lasted for months, the equivalent in humans of more than a decade.

Giving dasatinib-quercitin combo in mice at the age equivalent of 75 to 90 years in humans let them live 36% longer with better physical function.

That extra lifespan did not come with an extra dose of misery either: In their final two months of life, the physical function of the treated mice was at least as good as that period in the lives of normally aging mice that died earlier. That was seen in tests of walking speed, grip strength and hanging endurance given to the animals in their last weeks and months of life.

Nature Medicine -Senolytics improve physical function and increase lifespan in old age

Physical function declines in old age, portending disability, increased health expenditures, and mortality. Cellular senescence, leading to tissue dysfunction, may contribute to these consequences of aging, but whether senescence can directly drive age-related pathology and be therapeutically targeted is still unclear. Here we demonstrate that transplanting relatively small numbers of senescent cells into young mice is sufficient to cause persistent physical dysfunction, as well as to spread cellular senescence to host tissues. Transplanting even fewer senescent cells had the same effect in older recipients and was accom-panied by reduced survival, indicating the potency of senescent cells in shortening health- and lifespan. The senolytic cocktail, dasatinib plus quercetin, which causes selective elimination of senescent cells, decreased the number of naturally occurring senescent cells and their secretion of frailty-related proinflammatory cytokines in explants of human adipose tissue. Moreover, intermittent oral administration of senolytics to both senescent cell–transplanted young mice and naturally aged mice allevi-ated physical dysfunction and increased post-treatment survival by 36% while reducing mortality hazard to 65%. Our study provides proof-of-concept evidence that senescent cells can cause physical dysfunction and decreased survival even in young mice, while senolytics can enhance remaining health- and lifespan in old mice

69 thoughts on “Mice given dasatinib-quercitin lived 36% longer and in better health”

  1. An effective “mimic” for metformin is at LifeExtension as LONGEVITY. AI designed at Insilico AI lab at John Hopkins, using 3 natural substances.. Check Info on LONGEVITY at Life Ext. I am 87, Longevity lowered my AIc remarkably.

    Reply
  2. An effective mimic”” for metformin is at LifeExtension as LONGEVITY. AI designed at Insilico AI lab at John Hopkins”” using 3 natural substances.. Check Info on LONGEVITY at Life Ext. I am 87″” Longevity lowered my AIc remarkably.”””

    Reply
  3. An effective “mimic” for metformin is at LifeExtension as LONGEVITY. AI designed at Insilico AI lab at John Hopkins, using 3 natural substances.. Check Info on LONGEVITY at Life Ext. I am 87, Longevity lowered my AIc remarkably.

    Reply
  4. An effective mimic”” for metformin is at LifeExtension as LONGEVITY. AI designed at Insilico AI lab at John Hopkins”” using 3 natural substances.. Check Info on LONGEVITY at Life Ext. I am 87″” Longevity lowered my AIc remarkably.”””

    Reply
  5. An effective “mimic” for metformin is at LifeExtension as LONGEVITY. AI designed at Insilico AI lab at John Hopkins, using 3 natural substances.. Check Info on LONGEVITY at Life Ext. I am 87, Longevity lowered my AIc remarkably.

    Reply
  6. I think they’ll be positive, since the main effect will be curve squaring; People staying healthy and productive until they die of some sort of accident.

    Reply
  7. I think they’ll be positive since the main effect will be curve squaring; People staying healthy and productive until they die of some sort of accident.

    Reply
  8. Fisetin is available as a food supplement even now. It is about twice as expensive as quercetine. So not really that expensive, unless you have to use it as food. Dasatinib is relatively expensive, but if it really works . The cost per dose is nothing compared to the savings from avoiding other medical treatments will dwarf the cost. For the OECED countries the price should be ok for almost everyone, considering the benefits. On top of that i am not really sure why it is so expensive. There are generic versions that are approved by FDA. Probably the economy of scale doesn’t work very well for it. It seems there are 4 US patents for dasatinib. 2 are on the application as medicine and expire in 2020 and there are 2 more about the production process. They expire in 2026. So, just by the time the fist 2 patents expire we might have more conclusive information on how well does it work for humans. And unless one has an immediate inflammatory condition then i would wait for the human trials to finish.

    Reply
  9. Fisetin is available as a food supplement even now. It is about twice as expensive as quercetine. So not really that expensive unless you have to use it as food. Dasatinib is relatively expensive but if it really works . The cost per dose is nothing compared to the savings from avoiding other medical treatments will dwarf the cost. For the OECED countries the price should be ok for almost everyone considering the benefits.On top of that i am not really sure why it is so expensive. There are generic versions that are approved by FDA. Probably the economy of scale doesn’t work very well for it. It seems there are 4 US patents for dasatinib. 2 are on the application as medicine and expire in 2020 and there are 2 more about the production process. They expire in 2026. So just by the time the fist 2 patents expire we might have more conclusive information on how well does it work for humans. And unless one has an immediate inflammatory condition then i would wait for the human trials to finish.

    Reply
  10. Creatures with a higher average mortality rate due to non-aging causes tend to have shorter lifespans, even if they avoid death from non age-related causes. Larger animals tend to die less often from non age-related causes (otherwise they go extinct due to the difficulties in replacing their numbers in a timely manner) so evolution favors them living longer because they can do more with it. But animals that live in trees can also benefit, as a species, from longer natural lifespans because they don’t die from non-aging causes as often as their ground-based equivalents. Humans are, believe it or not, one of the largest animals on this planet when considered in terms of numbers of species, and we have a very long lifespan for our size, very likely because we originally evolved in trees and, later on, developed things like tool use, fire, social structure, and even animal husbandry, that also probably made us less likely to pass away at an earlier age, thereby conferring a further evolutionary advantage in living longer.

    Reply
  11. Creatures with a higher average mortality rate due to non-aging causes tend to have shorter lifespans even if they avoid death from non age-related causes. Larger animals tend to die less often from non age-related causes (otherwise they go extinct due to the difficulties in replacing their numbers in a timely manner) so evolution favors them living longer because they can do more with it. But animals that live in trees can also benefit as a species from longer natural lifespans because they don’t die from non-aging causes as often as their ground-based equivalents. Humans are believe it or not one of the largest animals on this planet when considered in terms of numbers of species and we have a very long lifespan for our size very likely because we originally evolved in trees and later on developed things like tool use fire social structure and even animal husbandry that also probably made us less likely to pass away at an earlier age thereby conferring a further evolutionary advantage in living longer.

    Reply
  12. I wonder what would have happened if those mice had been given Telomerase to lengthen their Telomeres? I’m thinking they’d simply hit their Hayflick limits.

    Reply
  13. I wonder what would have happened if those mice had been given Telomerase to lengthen their Telomeres? I’m thinking they’d simply hit their Hayflick limits.

    Reply
  14. Do you want some metformin? Eat a big meal consisting of pasta, and not much else, particularly salad just before an annual checkup. Your blood glucose will be 200 mg/deciliter or so, you’ll be diagnosed diabetic, and the first drug they will try on you is metformin. Your insurance company will even pay for it.

    Reply
  15. Do you want some metformin? Eat a big meal consisting of pasta and not much else particularly salad just before an annual checkup. Your blood glucose will be 200 mg/deciliter or so you’ll be diagnosed diabetic and the first drug they will try on you is metformin. Your insurance company will even pay for it.

    Reply
  16. Fisetin is available as a food supplement even now. It is about twice as expensive as quercetine. So not really that expensive, unless you have to use it as food. Dasatinib is relatively expensive, but if it really works . The cost per dose is nothing compared to the savings from avoiding other medical treatments will dwarf the cost. For the OECED countries the price should be ok for almost everyone, considering the benefits.

    On top of that i am not really sure why it is so expensive. There are generic versions that are approved by FDA. Probably the economy of scale doesn’t work very well for it. It seems there are 4 US patents for dasatinib. 2 are on the application as medicine and expire in 2020 and there are 2 more about the production process. They expire in 2026.

    So, just by the time the fist 2 patents expire we might have more conclusive information on how well does it work for humans. And unless one has an immediate inflammatory condition then i would wait for the human trials to finish.

    Reply
  17. I got this mixed up with the story about Fisetin. Fisetin, if it checks out, will likely be available through LEF by this time next year. The thing about D&Q is that the Q does not do much on its own. You need both, with the D being a prescription only cancer drug. D has to be taken carefully as too much can harm you. So you have to get the therapeutic window right. It is also expensive. The good news about both sets of compounds is that you take them as a course of treatment and then stop. In any case, I expect other, probably better senolytic compounds to show up in the next couple of years. Since I’m fine now, I am in no hurry to take them. I can wait for the better (and presumably cheaper and safer ones) to show up before I try to use them.

    Reply
  18. I got this mixed up with the story about Fisetin. Fisetin if it checks out will likely be available through LEF by this time next year. The thing about D&Q is that the Q does not do much on its own. You need both with the D being a prescription only cancer drug. D has to be taken carefully as too much can harm you. So you have to get the therapeutic window right. It is also expensive. The good news about both sets of compounds is that you take them as a course of treatment and then stop. In any case I expect other probably better senolytic compounds to show up in the next couple of years. Since I’m fine now I am in no hurry to take them. I can wait for the better (and presumably cheaper and safer ones) to show up before I try to use them.

    Reply
  19. Creatures with a higher average mortality rate due to non-aging causes tend to have shorter lifespans, even if they avoid death from non age-related causes. Larger animals tend to die less often from non age-related causes (otherwise they go extinct due to the difficulties in replacing their numbers in a timely manner) so evolution favors them living longer because they can do more with it. But animals that live in trees can also benefit, as a species, from longer natural lifespans because they don’t die from non-aging causes as often as their ground-based equivalents. Humans are, believe it or not, one of the largest animals on this planet when considered in terms of numbers of species, and we have a very long lifespan for our size, very likely because we originally evolved in trees and, later on, developed things like tool use, fire, social structure, and even animal husbandry, that also probably made us less likely to pass away at an earlier age, thereby conferring a further evolutionary advantage in living longer.

    Reply
  20. It’s not whether life extension treatments will happen, it’s rather when. I’m concerned about the effects of life extension on society and the economy.

    Reply
  21. It’s not whether life extension treatments will happen it’s rather when. I’m concerned about the effects of life extension on society and the economy.

    Reply
  22. Dasatinib should be a lot cheaper by 2020. I would expect to see generic versions for $6 per tablet. Eating just once a day would combat aging.

    Reply
  23. Dasatinib should be a lot cheaper by 2020. I would expect to see generic versions for $6 per tablet. Eating just once a day would combat aging.

    Reply
  24. Diet and exercise together are an important combo. Cinnamon before each meal reduces insulin spikes. Reduce carbohydrate intake, since that promotes glycation. At least 20 minutes of high-intensity cardio exercise at least every other day is a useful stressor which helps to promote autophagy and remove senescent cells. Taking a mild cyto-toxin like Curcumin/Turmeric before cardio exercise also promotes autophagy and is senolytic. Likewise, Trehalose sugar taken before exercise also promotes autophagy and is senolytic. Heat sauna taken after cardio exercise is a complementary stressor which extends the benefits of cardio exercise. Cold showers taken at other times of day away from exercise can also be a useful stressor by compelling rapid production of cold shock proteins, thus promoting autophagy.

    Reply
  25. Diet and exercise together are an important combo. Cinnamon before each meal reduces insulin spikes. Reduce carbohydrate intake since that promotes glycation. At least 20 minutes of high-intensity cardio exercise at least every other day is a useful stressor which helps to promote autophagy and remove senescent cells. Taking a mild cyto-toxin like Curcumin/Turmeric before cardio exercise also promotes autophagy and is senolytic. Likewise Trehalose sugar taken before exercise also promotes autophagy and is senolytic. Heat sauna taken after cardio exercise is a complementary stressor which extends the benefits of cardio exercise. Cold showers taken at other times of day away from exercise can also be a useful stressor by compelling rapid production of cold shock proteins thus promoting autophagy.

    Reply
  26. Further to that – reduction of insulin spike associated with digestion would mean reduced glucose intake by cells, and thus less likelihood of producing the glycation associated with age-related senescence. But likewise, there are a lot of Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs) in fermented food and even cooked food. So if you like low-temperature cooking like Sous-Vide, it can reduce all these chemical reactions associated with cooking, which can also promote aging.

    Reply
  27. Further to that – reduction of insulin spike associated with digestion would mean reduced glucose intake by cells and thus less likelihood of producing the glycation associated with age-related senescence. But likewise there are a lot of Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs) in fermented food and even cooked food. So if you like low-temperature cooking like Sous-Vide it can reduce all these chemical reactions associated with cooking which can also promote aging.

    Reply
  28. People have been taking large doses of antioxidants for decades. They don’t yielded the same effects. I still take them…better to have some increase than none…and I think they help quality of life somewhat. But I do not think they will make me live to 110 or anything crazy. The reality is that humans have powerful built-in antioxidants, where rodents make very little of these. That is one of the reasons we live linger. The other main reason is that we have a lower operating temperature. Temperature is major. It could in fact be the real reason fasting increases lifespan as fasting reduces temperature. Consider that if you reduce the mouse body temperature 1/2 degree C via genetic engineering, you extend mouse lives 20%. That is also why boehead whales and naked mole rats live a ling time.

    Reply
  29. People have been taking large doses of antioxidants for decades. They don’t yielded the same effects. I still take them…better to have some increase than none…and I think they help quality of life somewhat. But I do not think they will make me live to 110 or anything crazy.The reality is that humans have powerful built-in antioxidants where rodents make very little of these. That is one of the reasons we live linger. The other main reason is that we have a lower operating temperature. Temperature is major. It could in fact be the real reason fasting increases lifespan as fasting reduces temperature. Consider that if you reduce the mouse body temperature 1/2 degree C via genetic engineering you extend mouse lives 20{22800fc54956079738b58e74e4dcd846757aa319aad70fcf90c97a58f3119a12}.That is also why boehead whales and naked mole rats live a ling time.

    Reply
  30. Cinnamon is a natural substance which can have effects similar to Metformin. You should take the Sri Lankan / Ceylon variety of Cinnamon, because it contains less of the liver-toxic Coumarin found in the Western variety of Cinnamon. They say that a bit of Cinnamon before each meal will reduce the insulin spike that happens with each meal digestion.

    Reply
  31. Cinnamon is a natural substance which can have effects similar to Metformin. You should take the Sri Lankan / Ceylon variety of Cinnamon because it contains less of the liver-toxic Coumarin found in the Western variety of Cinnamon. They say that a bit of Cinnamon before each meal will reduce the insulin spike that happens with each meal digestion.

    Reply
  32. Indeed. Fighting aging is a choice, impacting how well or bad you will pass your elder years, but so far maximum life span for humans isn’t. In my view, the first anti-aging treatment to show significant improvements and actual aging reductions and life span changes will be a very data oriented one, with a myriad of factors monitored at once across a long period of time. Kind of like having a full map of an individual’s DNA and his/her epigenetic indicators measuring aging and the actual impact of treatments on each. With a gradually growing number of treatments, many customized to that individual’s DNA and epigenetic makeup. Including big interventions like organ replacement and/or tissue rejuvenation. Aging is not a problem with a single cause, so there isn’t a single silver bullet fixing it all. This will make it expensive at first, only allowing rich people to get the full spectrum and gains. But as market demand and technology grow, it will become simpler and cheaper, until taking the form a regular checkup of those multiple aspects and the application of multiple treatments in smaller doses.

    Reply
  33. Indeed. Fighting aging is a choice impacting how well or bad you will pass your elder years but so far maximum life span for humans isn’t. In my view the first anti-aging treatment to show significant improvements and actual aging reductions and life span changes will be a very data oriented one with a myriad of factors monitored at once across a long period of time.Kind of like having a full map of an individual’s DNA and his/her epigenetic indicators measuring aging and the actual impact of treatments on each.With a gradually growing number of treatments many customized to that individual’s DNA and epigenetic makeup. Including big interventions like organ replacement and/or tissue rejuvenation.Aging is not a problem with a single cause so there isn’t a single silver bullet fixing it all.This will make it expensive at first only allowing rich people to get the full spectrum and gains. But as market demand and technology grow it will become simpler and cheaper until taking the form a regular checkup of those multiple aspects and the application of multiple treatments in smaller doses.

    Reply
  34. I wonder what would have happened if those mice had been given Telomerase to lengthen their Telomeres? I’m thinking they’d simply hit their Hayflick limits.

    Reply
  35. I suspect that if this compound works out, that it will be available from LEF as a supplement by this time next year. It would most certainly be safer than using D & Q, given that the D, being a cancer drug, can cause significant harm if taken too much or improperly. I think the best approach is to do both, as to get the benefit of both synoletic mechanisms.

    Reply
  36. I suspect that if this compound works out that it will be available from LEF as a supplement by this time next year. It would most certainly be safer than using D & Q given that the D being a cancer drug can cause significant harm if taken too much or improperly. I think the best approach is to do both as to get the benefit of both synoletic mechanisms.

    Reply
  37. Do you want some metformin? Eat a big meal consisting of pasta, and not much else, particularly salad just before an annual checkup. Your blood glucose will be 200 mg/deciliter or so, you’ll be diagnosed diabetic, and the first drug they will try on you is metformin. Your insurance company will even pay for it.

    Reply
  38. Yea there are still a lot of aging vectors that need to be addressed before we have mastery over aging. In addition to cross-linking and other waste accumulation, you have mitochondrial and DNA degradation, inflammation damage , endocrine issues etc. They are all sort of interrelated and all contribute towards the aging process. We are so incredibly complex, and as you mentioned, what works on mice and worms in the lab doesn’t necessarily translate to us. But I think we can all significantly improve our healthspan/lifespan in the here and now by focusing on frequent fasting (both intermittent and extended autophagy targeting protocols), weight resistance and cardio exercise, controlling stress via hobbies and meditation, pursuing a rewarding purpose in life (whatever that may be to each of us), maintaining a strong bond with friends and family , reasonable dietary intake such as limting processed foods and excessive animal protein in later years, avoiding excessive alcohol and never smoking, broad spectrum supplementation with vitamin D/certain multivitamins, SOD, K2, Glutathione, anti-inflammatories like tumeric and ginger, NAD+, CoQ10, Sulforophane etc , hormone augmentation etc. No single one of those things will automatically prevent aging, but when all combined, I’m convinced they can add up to extra decades of health and happiness for most people. The point is to limit damage to our bodies until the day comes when serious rejuvenation technology is available. We don’t know when that will be, so we just have to control the variables we can influence for now. I’ve seen this protocol work on my 72 year old mother. She fasts 36 hours every week + eats only 2 meals a day . She lifts weights and has the grip strength of untrained man . No joke her strength is unreal for a women, irregardless of age. She free squats her own bodyweight, and has the blood markers and bone density of a 40 year old woman. Her mental alertness is great – no struggling

    Reply
  39. Yea there are still a lot of aging vectors that need to be addressed before we have mastery over aging. In addition to cross-linking and other waste accumulation you have mitochondrial and DNA degradation inflammation damage endocrine issues etc. They are all sort of interrelated and all contribute towards the aging process. We are so incredibly complex and as you mentioned what works on mice and worms in the lab doesn’t necessarily translate to us.But I think we can all significantly improve our healthspan/lifespan in the here and now by focusing on frequent fasting (both intermittent and extended autophagy targeting protocols) weight resistance and cardio exercise controlling stress via hobbies and meditation pursuing a rewarding purpose in life (whatever that may be to each of us) maintaining a strong bond with friends and family reasonable dietary intake such as limting processed foods and excessive animal protein in later years avoiding excessive alcohol and never smoking broad spectrum supplementation with vitamin D/certain multivitamins SOD K2 Glutathione anti-inflammatories like tumeric and ginger NAD+ CoQ10 Sulforophane etc hormone augmentation etc.No single one of those things will automatically prevent aging but when all combined I’m convinced they can add up to extra decades of health and happiness for most people. The point is to limit damage to our bodies until the day comes when serious rejuvenation technology is available. We don’t know when that will be so we just have to control the variables we can influence for now.I’ve seen this protocol work on my 72 year old mother. She fasts 36 hours every week + eats only 2 meals a day . She lifts weights and has the grip strength of untrained man . No joke her strength is unreal for a women irregardless of age. She free squats her own bodyweight and has the blood markers and bone density of a 40 year old woman. Her mental alertness is great – no struggling for words

    Reply
  40. I got this mixed up with the story about Fisetin. Fisetin, if it checks out, will likely be available through LEF by this time next year. The thing about D&Q is that the Q does not do much on its own. You need both, with the D being a prescription only cancer drug. D has to be taken carefully as too much can harm you. So you have to get the therapeutic window right. It is also expensive. The good news about both sets of compounds is that you take them as a course of treatment and then stop. In any case, I expect other, probably better senolytic compounds to show up in the next couple of years. Since I’m fine now, I am in no hurry to take them. I can wait for the better (and presumably cheaper and safer ones) to show up before I try to use them.

    Reply
  41. Along with the recent announcement on fisetin, this is certainly interesting. I’ve been taken fisetin and quercitin (it may help and it hasn’t hurt, that I can tell) for years but, unfortunately, it’s a bit harder to come by prescription things like dasatinib and metformin (although supposedly Goat’s Rue is a suitable sub for the latter).

    Reply
  42. Along with the recent announcement on fisetin this is certainly interesting. I’ve been taken fisetin and quercitin (it may help and it hasn’t hurt that I can tell) for years but unfortunately it’s a bit harder to come by prescription things like dasatinib and metformin (although supposedly Goat’s Rue is a suitable sub for the latter).

    Reply
  43. And therein lies the problem with using mice as your test subjects. You get dramatic improvements in longevity because mice simply aren’t designed to be long lived animals. So anti-oxidants and senolytics produce dramatic gains in life expectancy in mice that may or may not translate to humans. This is why I think George Church’s approach of using dogs as his test subjects will likely bear more fruit more quickly. Each treated dog is a stand alone paying customer (via their owner of course) & also a test subject for the tech as well as free advertising to the public. Another added bonus is that it is much faster and cheaper to get approval for new pet treatment than for humans.

    Reply
  44. And therein lies the problem with using mice as your test subjects. You get dramatic improvements in longevity because mice simply aren’t designed to be long lived animals. So anti-oxidants and senolytics produce dramatic gains in life expectancy in mice that may or may not translate to humans. This is why I think George Church’s approach of using dogs as his test subjects will likely bear more fruit more quickly. Each treated dog is a stand alone paying customer (via their owner of course) & also a test subject for the tech as well as free advertising to the public. Another added bonus is that it is much faster and cheaper to get approval for new pet treatment than for humans.

    Reply
  45. The quality of life sounds legit and has been seen before with senolytics or senoletic effects, but the life extension could just be because quercitin is an antioxidant. Antioxidants work very well in rodents, but only give small improvements in humans beyond nutritional need. Still, I am very optimistic about senolytics. Who wouldn’t want their final decades to be good ones? Though what we really need is something to effectively remove Glucosepane. That is responsible for a lot of the negative aspects of aging in humans.

    Reply
  46. The quality of life sounds legit and has been seen before with senolytics or senoletic effects but the life extension could just be because quercitin is an antioxidant. Antioxidants work very well in rodents but only give small improvements in humans beyond nutritional need.Still I am very optimistic about senolytics. Who wouldn’t want their final decades to be good ones? Though what we really need is something to effectively remove Glucosepane. That is responsible for a lot of the negative aspects of aging in humans.

    Reply
  47. Diet and exercise together are an important combo. Cinnamon before each meal reduces insulin spikes. Reduce carbohydrate intake, since that promotes glycation. At least 20 minutes of high-intensity cardio exercise at least every other day is a useful stressor which helps to promote autophagy and remove senescent cells. Taking a mild cyto-toxin like Curcumin/Turmeric before cardio exercise also promotes autophagy and is senolytic. Likewise, Trehalose sugar taken before exercise also promotes autophagy and is senolytic. Heat sauna taken after cardio exercise is a complementary stressor which extends the benefits of cardio exercise. Cold showers taken at other times of day away from exercise can also be a useful stressor by compelling rapid production of cold shock proteins, thus promoting autophagy.

    Reply
  48. Further to that – reduction of insulin spike associated with digestion would mean reduced glucose intake by cells, and thus less likelihood of producing the glycation associated with age-related senescence. But likewise, there are a lot of Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs) in fermented food and even cooked food. So if you like low-temperature cooking like Sous-Vide, it can reduce all these chemical reactions associated with cooking, which can also promote aging.

    Reply
  49. People have been taking large doses of antioxidants for decades. They don’t yielded the same effects. I still take them…better to have some increase than none…and I think they help quality of life somewhat. But I do not think they will make me live to 110 or anything crazy.

    The reality is that humans have powerful built-in antioxidants, where rodents make very little of these. That is one of the reasons we live linger. The other main reason is that we have a lower operating temperature. Temperature is major. It could in fact be the real reason fasting increases lifespan as fasting reduces temperature. Consider that if you reduce the mouse body temperature 1/2 degree C via genetic engineering, you extend mouse lives 20%.

    That is also why boehead whales and naked mole rats live a ling time.

    Reply
  50. Cinnamon is a natural substance which can have effects similar to Metformin. You should take the Sri Lankan / Ceylon variety of Cinnamon, because it contains less of the liver-toxic Coumarin found in the Western variety of Cinnamon. They say that a bit of Cinnamon before each meal will reduce the insulin spike that happens with each meal digestion.

    Reply
  51. Indeed. Fighting aging is a choice, impacting how well or bad you will pass your elder years, but so far maximum life span for humans isn’t.

    In my view, the first anti-aging treatment to show significant improvements and actual aging reductions and life span changes will be a very data oriented one, with a myriad of factors monitored at once across a long period of time.

    Kind of like having a full map of an individual’s DNA and his/her epigenetic indicators measuring aging and the actual impact of treatments on each.

    With a gradually growing number of treatments, many customized to that individual’s DNA and epigenetic makeup. Including big interventions like organ replacement and/or tissue rejuvenation.

    Aging is not a problem with a single cause, so there isn’t a single silver bullet fixing it all.

    This will make it expensive at first, only allowing rich people to get the full spectrum and gains. But as market demand and technology grow, it will become simpler and cheaper, until taking the form a regular checkup of those multiple aspects and the application of multiple treatments in smaller doses.

    Reply
  52. I suspect that if this compound works out, that it will be available from LEF as a supplement by this time next year. It would most certainly be safer than using D & Q, given that the D, being a cancer drug, can cause significant harm if taken too much or improperly. I think the best approach is to do both, as to get the benefit of both synoletic mechanisms.

    Reply
  53. Yea there are still a lot of aging vectors that need to be addressed before we have mastery over aging.
    In addition to cross-linking and other waste accumulation, you have mitochondrial and DNA degradation, inflammation damage , endocrine issues etc. They are all sort of interrelated and all contribute towards the aging process.

    We are so incredibly complex, and as you mentioned, what works on mice and worms in the lab doesn’t necessarily translate to us.

    But I think we can all significantly improve our healthspan/lifespan in the here and now by focusing on frequent fasting (both intermittent and extended autophagy targeting protocols), weight resistance and cardio exercise, controlling stress via hobbies and meditation, pursuing a rewarding purpose in life (whatever that may be to each of us), maintaining a strong bond with friends and family , reasonable dietary intake such as limting processed foods and excessive animal protein in later years, avoiding excessive alcohol and never smoking, broad spectrum supplementation with vitamin D/certain multivitamins, SOD, K2, Glutathione, anti-inflammatories like tumeric and ginger, NAD+, CoQ10, Sulforophane etc , hormone augmentation etc.

    No single one of those things will automatically prevent aging, but when all combined, I’m convinced they can add up to extra decades of health and happiness for most people. The point is to limit damage to our bodies until the day comes when serious rejuvenation technology is available. We don’t know when that will be, so we just have to control the variables we can influence for now.

    I’ve seen this protocol work on my 72 year old mother. She fasts 36 hours every week + eats only 2 meals a day . She lifts weights and has the grip strength of untrained man . No joke her strength is unreal for a women, irregardless of age. She free squats her own bodyweight, and has the blood markers and bone density of a 40 year old woman.

    Her mental alertness is great – no struggling for words or forgetfulness. Compared to her sister, who does nothing, the difference between the two is incredible. In fact the only thing that tips off her age is her thin skin, because she has declined HGH supplementation due to its possible cancer promoting actions. She has perfect blood pressure, non existent C Reactive Protein, and a low A1C. The only meds she takes is an estrogen/testosterone blend and a small dose of Armour. No blood pressure drugs or anything like that. She should glide along until her 90s at this point.

    We are not helpless victims to aging and decline. But most people simply do not want put in the sustained effort over a lifetime to do anything about it.

    Reply
  54. Along with the recent announcement on fisetin, this is certainly interesting. I’ve been taken fisetin and quercitin (it may help and it hasn’t hurt, that I can tell) for years but, unfortunately, it’s a bit harder to come by prescription things like dasatinib and metformin (although supposedly Goat’s Rue is a suitable sub for the latter).

    Reply
  55. And therein lies the problem with using mice as your test subjects. You get dramatic improvements in longevity because mice simply aren’t designed to be long lived animals. So anti-oxidants and senolytics produce dramatic gains in life expectancy in mice that may or may not translate to humans. This is why I think George Church’s approach of using dogs as his test subjects will likely bear more fruit more quickly. Each treated dog is a stand alone paying customer (via their owner of course) & also a test subject for the tech as well as free advertising to the public. Another added bonus is that it is much faster and cheaper to get approval for new pet treatment than for humans.

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  56. The quality of life sounds legit and has been seen before with senolytics or senoletic effects, but the life extension could just be because quercitin is an antioxidant. Antioxidants work very well in rodents, but only give small improvements in humans beyond nutritional need.

    Still, I am very optimistic about senolytics. Who wouldn’t want their final decades to be good ones? Though what we really need is something to effectively remove Glucosepane. That is responsible for a lot of the negative aspects of aging in humans.

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