NASA funds improvement of Miralon to double CNT composite strength

NASA awarded a potential $8.1 million dollar contract to Nanocomp Technologies, now part of Huntsman, for the “continued improvement of manufacturing high-strength CNT yarn/tape for use in developing CNT composites with strength properties at least double that of carbon fiber composites in use today.

Successful improvement of this nanotechnology that could enable lighter spacecraft and launch vehicles, making spaceflight and exploration more affordable.

October 29, 2018, will have technology demonstrations of:

* Next-generation yarn production
* Miralon as a heat shield for space, aircraft and automotive applications
* Furnaces producing sheet and yarn product
* Miralon heated furniture and fixtures
* Miralon yarn as a wire for lighting

MiralonĀ® is a continuous interconnected network of extremely long carbon tubes that does not require cross-linking or use of binders. Miralon is produced as sheets, yarn, and dispersed products. It is on the scale of millimeters (1mm-10mm) versus micrometers and classified by the EPA as an article, not a particle, which makes for safe handling. Miralon exploits many of the remarkable properties of individual CNTs spanning the electrical, mechanical, and thermal domains successfully at application scale.

35 thoughts on “NASA funds improvement of Miralon to double CNT composite strength”

  1. The much longer CNTs have the benefit of Van Der Waals forces to hold them together, without necessarily having to functionalize them through something like fluorochemistry. But corkscrew helical conformations are still better in preventing them from slipping through a matrix.

  2. The much longer CNTs have the benefit of Van Der Waals forces to hold them together without necessarily having to functionalize them through something like fluorochemistry. But corkscrew helical conformations are still better in preventing them from slipping through a matrix.

  3. It would be interesting to see a chart with tensile strength / weight by year. Just to check if Kurzweil Law is respected here too.

  4. It would be interesting to see a chart with tensile strength / weight by year.Just to check if Kurzweil Law is respected here too.

  5. Heatshield? Or something more like a heatpipe due to conductivity, similar in concept to carbon fiber thread radiators?

  6. Heatshield? Or something more like a heatpipe due to conductivity similar in concept to carbon fiber thread radiators?

  7. The actual strength numbers are mentioned nowhere on their website or in any of their press releases. But some scientific papers reference 0.8 to 1.0 GPa, which isn’t any better than off the shelf Kevlar. Of course they are dealing with a technology that could potentially end up much, much stronger than that.

  8. Their product is available as sheeting and one demonstration they like to do is apply a gas torch to the sheet and show how it is unaffected. So they could well mean heat shield.

  9. The actual strength numbers are mentioned nowhere on their website or in any of their press releases. But some scientific papers reference 0.8 to 1.0 GPa which isn’t any better than off the shelf Kevlar.Of course they are dealing with a technology that could potentially end up much much stronger than that.

  10. Their product is available as sheeting and one demonstration they like to do is apply a gas torch to the sheet and show how it is unaffected. So they could well mean heat shield.

  11. The actual strength numbers are mentioned nowhere on their website or in any of their press releases. But some scientific papers reference 0.8 to 1.0 GPa, which isn’t any better than off the shelf Kevlar. Of course they are dealing with a technology that could potentially end up much, much stronger than that.

  12. The actual strength numbers are mentioned nowhere on their website or in any of their press releases. But some scientific papers reference 0.8 to 1.0 GPa which isn’t any better than off the shelf Kevlar.Of course they are dealing with a technology that could potentially end up much much stronger than that.

  13. Their product is available as sheeting and one demonstration they like to do is apply a gas torch to the sheet and show how it is unaffected. So they could well mean heat shield.

  14. Their product is available as sheeting and one demonstration they like to do is apply a gas torch to the sheet and show how it is unaffected. So they could well mean heat shield.

  15. Heatshield? Or something more like a heatpipe due to conductivity, similar in concept to carbon fiber thread radiators?

  16. Heatshield? Or something more like a heatpipe due to conductivity similar in concept to carbon fiber thread radiators?

  17. It would be interesting to see a chart with tensile strength / weight by year. Just to check if Kurzweil Law is respected here too.

  18. It would be interesting to see a chart with tensile strength / weight by year.Just to check if Kurzweil Law is respected here too.

  19. The actual strength numbers are mentioned nowhere on their website or in any of their press releases. But some scientific papers reference 0.8 to 1.0 GPa, which isn’t any better than off the shelf Kevlar.

    Of course they are dealing with a technology that could potentially end up much, much stronger than that.

  20. Their product is available as sheeting and one demonstration they like to do is apply a gas torch to the sheet and show how it is unaffected. So they could well mean heat shield.

  21. The much longer CNTs have the benefit of Van Der Waals forces to hold them together, without necessarily having to functionalize them through something like fluorochemistry. But corkscrew helical conformations are still better in preventing them from slipping through a matrix.

  22. The much longer CNTs have the benefit of Van Der Waals forces to hold them together without necessarily having to functionalize them through something like fluorochemistry. But corkscrew helical conformations are still better in preventing them from slipping through a matrix.

  23. The much longer CNTs have the benefit of Van Der Waals forces to hold them together, without necessarily having to functionalize them through something like fluorochemistry. But corkscrew helical conformations are still better in preventing them from slipping through a matrix.

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