Many Coronavirus Clinical Trials in China

There is reports of 77 different Coronavirus clinical trial applications filed have been China. Other sources talking about 19 clinical trials registered in China. Two weeks ago there were an estimated 30 anti-coronavirus therapies in the pipeline.

Researchers in China are launching more systematic tests of these repurposed medicines. Since January 28, scientists have registered 19 clinical trials in China, and at least a few have already begun dosing patients. With initial results expected as early as April.

Companies such as Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Moderna, and Novavax have been reported to be developing coronavirus vaccines. Two weeks ago there were a total of 30 anti-coronavirus therapies there were to be tested.

Clinical-stage biotech company GeoVax signed a letter of intent with BravoVax, a vaccine developer based in Wuhan, China, to jointly develop a coronavirus vaccine using genetic sequences of the 2019-nCoV.

Clover Biopharmaceuticals is developing a recombinant subunit vaccine using its patented Trimer-Tag© technology. The company is developing the vaccine based on the trimeric S protein (S-Trimer) of the 2019-nCoV virus, which is responsible for binding with the host cell and causing a viral infection.

Using Trimer-Tag© technology, Clover successfully produced the subunit vaccine in a mammalian cell-culture based expression system on 10 February. The company also identified antigen-specific antibody in the serum of fully recovered patients who were previously infected by the virus.

NanoViricides, a clinical-stage company, is working on developing a treatment for nCoV-2019 using its nanoviricide® technology. The company’s technology is used to develop ligands that can bind to the virus in the same way as a cognate receptor and attack various points of the virus.

Vir Biotechnology, a clinical-stage immunology company, announced on 12 February that it has identified two monoclonal antibodies that can bind to the virus that causes COVID-19. The antibodies target the spike (S) protein of the virus by entering through the cellular receptor ACE2.

Two trials began recruiting patients last week. They will test the efficacy of remdesivir, an experimental antiviral produced by American drugmaker Gilead. It works by blocking the enzyme that many viruses use to replicate inside human cells.

Dr. Marie-Paule Kieny, a former WHO virologist, co-chaired a two-day, closed-door research forum in Geneva of more than 300 scientists and researchers, including some who took part virtually from China and Taiwan.

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