Another Perfect SpaceX Starlink Launch

SpaceX launched 52 Starlink satellites, a Capella Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellite, and Tyvak-0130.

The Falcon 9 first stage booster that supported this mission previously launched NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley to the International Space Station, ANASIS-II, CRS-21, Transporter-1, and three Starlink missions. Following stage separation, SpaceX will land Falcon 9’s first stage on the “Of Course I Still Love You” droneship, which will be located in the Atlantic Ocean. One half of Falcon 9’s fairing previously supported the SXM-7 mission, and the other previously supported the NROL-108 mission.

There are now 1605 SpaceX Starlink satellites in orbit.

SpaceX is launching Starlink satellites about once a week in May, 2021. There have been 13 successful Starlink launches in 2021. This is the 19th week of the year.

SOURCES – SpaceX
Written by Brian Wang, Nextbigfuture.com

6 thoughts on “Another Perfect SpaceX Starlink Launch”

  1. I can't believe there are already 1605 Starlink satelites in orbit. The guy who figured that they should redesign satelites to rectangular dimensions and stack 60 of them on top of each other deserves a lot of credit.

    As amateur astronomer I can say it is funny to see all that satelites in orbit. You see a convoy – like a train of satelites passing the sky in a line.

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  2. Word is that starlink comes out of beta this summer. I know someone that it will make a world of difference to. Even if your neighborhood has "cable internet" a long cable run can be prohibitively costly. I thought about wi-fi repeaters, but didn't want to travel hundreds of miles to install them.

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  3. Twinkle twinkle little star
    You must be a small pulsar
    Out away from earth you drift
    This we know from your red shift
    Twinkle twinkle little star
    Degenerate matter is what you are

    Stolen from Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal

    Reply
  4. They make hard things look routine, but they aren't.

    As the recent incident with Rocket Lab electron shows.

    Reply

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