July 15, 2016

US launches $400 million advanced wireless initiative and new spectrum policy

The US has launched a $400 million Advanced Wireless Research Initiative led by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

The new program will enable the deployment and use of four city-scale testing platforms for advanced wireless research over the next decade and builds upon the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) Spectrum Frontiers vote yesterday.

It will make vast quantities of high-frequency millimeter wave spectrum available for both licensed and unlicensed use. This spectrum, in combination with other spectrum already available, promises to enable faster speeds, quicker response times (“lower latency”), and increased capacity in future wireless networks.

The spectrum policy and research efforts will accelerate the deployment of a new generation of wireless networks that are up to 100 times faster than today. These super-fast, ultra-low latency, high-capacity networks will enable breakthrough applications for consumers, smart cities, and the Internet of Things that cannot even be imagined today. Possible advances in the next decade could bring:

  • Mobile phones and tablets that can download full length HD movies in less than 5 seconds, 100 times faster than 4G (6 minutes) and 25,000 times faster than 3G (26 hours).
  • First responders and emergency room doctors who get live, real-time video and sensor data from police vehicles, ambulances, and drones, along with patient vitals and medical records—all before the patient arrives at the hospital door.
  • Semi- or fully-autonomous vehicles that can communicate with the outside world and with each other to improve travel efficiency and safety.
  • Factories equipped with always-connected smart manufacturing equipment that self-diagnose and repair themselves before they break.
  • Gigabit-speed wireless broadband available in businesses, public transportation stations, stadiums, campuses, schools, malls, parks, and other public spaces.
  • Virtual reality training environments and simulators that allow entry-level workers to develop and demonstrate skills in high-demand fields like solar energy installation—anytime, from anywhere.



The initiative includes an $85 million investment in advanced wireless testing platforms that comes from the NSF and more than 20 technology companies, including Samsung, Intel and Verizon. The foundation also said that it will invest an additional $350 million over the next 7 years in academic research to test these platforms.



SOURCES - Whitehouse, CNET

Форма для связи

Name

Email *

Message *