Dwave Systems and Google are trying to find Quantum Supremacy

Dwave Systems has known for about three years that is substantial quantum entanglement in their systems. They have been able to show this entanglement on much larger systems [than a recently publish 8 qubit result] and obtained similar results. So Dwave Systems knows there is substantial entanglement in these types of systems. Right now they are trying to characterize how to use it to gain what Google calls ‘quantum supremacy’. Geordie Rose has commented that there has been very good progress on that [finding quantum supremacy]…

Not even the people who built the 512 qubit and 1024 qubit Dwave Quantum computing systems know exactly how it works and what it can do. That’s what Google’s Hartmut Neven is trying to figure out, sitting in his lab, week in, week out, patiently learning to talk to the D-Wave. If he can figure out the puzzle—what this box can do that nothing else can, and how—then boom. “It’s what we call ‘quantum supremacy,’” he says. “Essentially, something that cannot be matched anymore by classical machines.” It would be, in short, a new computer age.

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Dwave Systems and Google are trying to find Quantum Supremacy

Dwave Systems has known for about three years that is substantial quantum entanglement in their systems. They have been able to show this entanglement on much larger systems [than a recently publish 8 qubit result] and obtained similar results. So Dwave Systems knows there is substantial entanglement in these types of systems. Right now they are trying to characterize how to use it to gain what Google calls ‘quantum supremacy’. Geordie Rose has commented that there has been very good progress on that [finding quantum supremacy]…

Not even the people who built the 512 qubit and 1024 qubit Dwave Quantum computing systems know exactly how it works and what it can do. That’s what Google’s Hartmut Neven is trying to figure out, sitting in his lab, week in, week out, patiently learning to talk to the D-Wave. If he can figure out the puzzle—what this box can do that nothing else can, and how—then boom. “It’s what we call ‘quantum supremacy,’” he says. “Essentially, something that cannot be matched anymore by classical machines.” It would be, in short, a new computer age.

If you liked this article, please give it a quick review on ycombinator or StumbleUpon. Thanks

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Subscribe and get a FREE Ebook