Gold and silver nanostructures claimed to have room temperature superconductivity

Arxiv – Evidence for Superconductivity at Ambient Temperature and Pressure in Nanostructures

Despite being a low temperature phenomenon till date, superconductivity has found numerous applications in diverse fields of medicine, science and engineering. The great scientific interest in the phenomenon as well as its practical utility has motivated extensive efforts to discover and understand new superconductors. We report the observation of superconductivity at ambient temperature and pressure conditions in films and pellets of a nanostructured material that is composed of silver particles embedded into a gold matrix. Specifically, we observe that upon cooling below 236 K at ambient pressures, the resistance of sample films drops below 10-4 Ohm, being limited by instrument sensitivity. Further, below the transition temperature, samples become strongly diamagnetic, with volume susceptibilities as low as -0.056. We further describe methods to tune the transition to temperatures higher than room temperature.

Superconductivity was observed -123°C for applied fields of three to five Tesla.

Given the extraordinary and exciting nature of this claim, it is worth examining the reported data closely. A researcher found an identical pattern of noise for two presumably independent measurements of the magnetic susceptibility as a function of temperature.

Brian Wang is a Futurist Thought Leader and a popular Science blogger with 1 million readers per month. His blog Nextbigfuture.com is ranked #1 Science News Blog. It covers many disruptive technology and trends including Space, Robotics, Artificial Intelligence, Medicine, Anti-aging Biotechnology, and Nanotechnology.

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57 thoughts on “Gold and silver nanostructures claimed to have room temperature superconductivity”

  1. Shows that progress is being made in better understanding Nature of Superconductivity in general and RT in particular!!!

  2. Finally might put gold to use outside of jewelry. I think I read that the phenomenon was observed in a microscopic film or quantity – so maybe it won’t play out in a macroscopic big wire sense?

  3. Shows that progress is being made in better understanding Nature of Superconductivity in general and RT in particular!!!

  4. Finally might put gold to use outside of jewelry.I think I read that the phenomenon was observed in a microscopic film or quantity – so maybe it won’t play out in a macroscopic big wire sense?

  5. Not terribly viable for the grid, but if this really does work, it could be great for audiophile stuff, sensors, military electronics, and more compact MRI machines (perhaps even handheld).

  6. Gold is the best tooth filling material, great for electrical contacts, good for space suit helmet visors. Too bad its number one use is as a paperweight in a steel box. It really should be used in tooth fillings more. Amalgam is about 55% mercury and shrinks over time. Composite expands and breaks teeth. Ceramic wears down the tooth it meets, if that one does not also have a ceramic surface.

  7. Even if it doesn’t occur in bulk though, one could make a layered structure with thin insulating / dopant layers. That might even be beneficial for some applications. E.g it would limit eddy currents. But need to find the right combination of materials, so that the interface wouldn’t mess things up.

  8. Gold actually does have industrial uses in electronics. It’s great for making good contacts that don’t oxidize. I see a lot of indications that higher temperature superconductivity might not be a bulk phenomenon. Not just limited to Joe Eck’s work. I suspect strained structures are involved.

  9. Repeatability will be the big thing here. We’ll see if others report it or it’s a ‘Gee, it’s a shame others aren’t getting the same results!’ (And maybe it’s time to seriously start looking at asteroid mining. IF TRUE then gold and silver will be wanted in real industrial quantities…) (BTW, this Vuukle commenting system? It’s garbage. Keeps telling me to refresh and hit Post again, but never accepts my comment.)

  10. Not terribly viable for the grid but if this really does work it could be great for audiophile stuff sensors military electronics and more compact MRI machines (perhaps even handheld).

  11. Gold is the best tooth filling material great for electrical contacts good for space suit helmet visors. Too bad its number one use is as a paperweight in a steel box. It really should be used in tooth fillings more. Amalgam is about 55{22800fc54956079738b58e74e4dcd846757aa319aad70fcf90c97a58f3119a12} mercury and shrinks over time. Composite expands and breaks teeth. Ceramic wears down the tooth it meets if that one does not also have a ceramic surface.

  12. Even if it doesn’t occur in bulk though one could make a layered structure with thin insulating / dopant layers. That might even be beneficial for some applications. E.g it would limit eddy currents. But need to find the right combination of materials so that the interface wouldn’t mess things up.

  13. Gold actually does have industrial uses in electronics. It’s great for making good contacts that don’t oxidize.I see a lot of indications that higher temperature superconductivity might not be a bulk phenomenon. Not just limited to Joe Eck’s work. I suspect strained structures are involved.

  14. Repeatability will be the big thing here. We’ll see if others report it or it’s a ‘Gee it’s a shame others aren’t getting the same results!'(And maybe it’s time to seriously start looking at asteroid mining. IF TRUE then gold and silver will be wanted in real industrial quantities…)(BTW this Vuukle commenting system? It’s garbage. Keeps telling me to refresh and hit Post again but never accepts my comment.)

  15. Yup got stripped. Go to ars technica . com (remove the spaces) and scroll down for a nice write-up on the questions being asked about the research.

  16. Yup got stripped.Go to ars technica . com (remove the spaces) and scroll down for a nice write-up on the questions being asked about the research.

  17. Many materials properties change profoundly at submicron scales. Gold for instance changes from being inert to having catalytic effects similar to that of platinum.

  18. Many materials properties change profoundly at submicron scales. Gold, for instance, changes from being inert to having catalytic effects similar to that of platinum.

  19. I had posted links in the original comment, and did not realize they had been stripped out until now. Great commenting system we have, here. This finally (and appropriately) has a higher status entry of its own on this site. The basic allegation is a cut-and-paste of data followed by algebraic manipulation, with evidence from the reported data itself.

  20. I had posted links in the original comment and did not realize they had been stripped out until now. Great commenting system we have here. This finally (and appropriately) has a higher status entry of its own on this site.The basic allegation is a cut-and-paste of data followed by algebraic manipulation with evidence from the reported data itself.

  21. I’ve invented a room-temperature superconductor. It is very reproducible. Just fill a room with liquid nitrogen. Then superconductivity happens at room temperature.

  22. I’ve invented a room-temperature superconductor. It is very reproducible. Just fill a room with liquid nitrogen. Then superconductivity happens at room temperature.

  23. I’ve invented a room-temperature superconductor. It is very reproducible. Just fill a room with liquid nitrogen. Then superconductivity happens at room temperature.

  24. I’ve invented a room-temperature superconductor. It is very reproducible. Just fill a room with liquid nitrogen. Then superconductivity happens at room temperature.

  25. I’ve invented a room-temperature superconductor. It is very reproducible. Just fill a room with liquid nitrogen. Then superconductivity happens at room temperature.

  26. I had posted links in the original comment, and did not realize they had been stripped out until now. Great commenting system we have, here. This finally (and appropriately) has a higher status entry of its own on this site.

    The basic allegation is a cut-and-paste of data followed by algebraic manipulation, with evidence from the reported data itself.

  27. Many materials properties change profoundly at submicron scales. Gold, for instance, changes from being inert to having catalytic effects similar to that of platinum.

  28. Not terribly viable for the grid, but if this really does work, it could be great for audiophile stuff, sensors, military electronics, and more compact MRI machines (perhaps even handheld).

  29. Gold is the best tooth filling material, great for electrical contacts, good for space suit helmet visors. Too bad its number one use is as a paperweight in a steel box. It really should be used in tooth fillings more. Amalgam is about 55% mercury and shrinks over time. Composite expands and breaks teeth. Ceramic wears down the tooth it meets, if that one does not also have a ceramic surface.

  30. Even if it doesn’t occur in bulk though, one could make a layered structure with thin insulating / dopant layers. That might even be beneficial for some applications. E.g it would limit eddy currents. But need to find the right combination of materials, so that the interface wouldn’t mess things up.

  31. Gold actually does have industrial uses in electronics. It’s great for making good contacts that don’t oxidize.

    I see a lot of indications that higher temperature superconductivity might not be a bulk phenomenon. Not just limited to Joe Eck’s work. I suspect strained structures are involved.

  32. Repeatability will be the big thing here. We’ll see if others report it or it’s a ‘Gee, it’s a shame others aren’t getting the same results!’

    (And maybe it’s time to seriously start looking at asteroid mining. IF TRUE then gold and silver will be wanted in real industrial quantities…)

    (BTW, this Vuukle commenting system? It’s garbage. Keeps telling me to refresh and hit Post again, but never accepts my comment.)

  33. Finally might put gold to use outside of jewelry.

    I think I read that the phenomenon was observed in a microscopic film or quantity – so maybe it won’t play out in a macroscopic big wire sense?

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