Tokyo creates 1200 Tesla for 100 microseconds

Physicists from the University of Tokyo have generated the strongest controllable magnetic field ever produced at 1200 Tesla. The field was sustained for longer than any previous field of a similar strength. At 1,200 teslas, the generated field dwarfs almost any artificial magnetic field ever recorded; however, it’s not the strongest overall. In 2001, physicists …

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33% improvement in superconducting magnets to 32 Tesla and 100+ Tesla magnets are on the horizon

The Florida State University-headquartered National High Magnetic Field Laboratory has shattered another world record with the testing of a 32-tesla magnet — 33 percent stronger than what had previously been the world’s strongest superconducting magnet used for research and more than 3,000 times stronger than a small refrigerator magnet. On Dec. 8, this new magnet …

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China multibillion space corporation announces 2500 mph vacuum train project

China Aerospace Science and Industry Corporation announced plans on Wednesday to research a futuristic train network that would first run at 1,000km per hour between cities, eventually developing to reach top speeds of 4,000km/h. That target is well over 10 times faster than the maximum speed of existing bullet trains. The idea was unveiled by …

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Strongest resistive magnet created with 41.4 tesla

National magnet lab reached a record of 41.4 teslas at 1:10 p.m. on Aug. 21 with a resistive magnet. It was the culmination of two and a half intense years of design and development. In so doing, the lab reclaimed the record for the world’s strongest resistive magnet, which it had held for 19 years …

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Duke creates new magnetic material atom by atom

Material scientists have predicted and built two new magnetic materials, atom-by-atom, using high-throughput computational models. The success marks a new era for the large-scale design of new magnetic materials at unprecedented speed. Although magnets abound in everyday life, they are actually rarities—only about five percent of known inorganic compounds show even a hint of magnetism. …

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Superconducting trapped field magnets at full magnetic strength that are 3.2 times stronger than before

University of Houston physicists report finding major theoretical flaws in the generally accepted understanding of how a superconductor traps and holds a magnetic field. More than 50 years ago, C.P. Bean, a scientist at General Electric, developed a theoretical explanation known as the “Bean Model” or “Critical State Model.” The basic property of superconductors is …

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Google cloud division head is correct that even if Kurzweil is right and Technological Singularity is 2045, the current odds are she will not live to see it

Diane Greene, head of Google’s cloud division, said in an interview at the Code Enterprise conference Tuesday in San Francisco, “Nobody expected some of the advances we are seeing as quickly as we’re seeing them,” she added. “I don’t expect to see the [Technological] Singularity in my sentient lifetime.” Diane Greene is 61 Ray Kurzweil …

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New device could improve cancer detection

A new University of British Columbia-developed method to isolate cancer cells that have escaped from a tumour could soon pave the way for improved diagnosis and treatment. The simple process involves a special device that squeezes cells in a blood sample through tiny funnels, which drive the cancer cells and blood cells into separate streams …

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Paramount Pictures has no honor and no right to copyright the Klingon language

The Language Creation Society submited a legal brief to defend the Axanar movie production against Paramount Pictures and CBS Paramount and CBS claim they have a copyright on the Klingon language as well as the look of many things used in the Star Trek TV show and movies. English translation: “we succeed together in a …

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Intelligence ‘networks’ discovered in brain for the first time

Scientists from Imperial College London have identified for the first time two clusters of genes linked to human intelligence. (H/T Futurepundit) Called M1 and M3, these so-called gene networks appear to influence cognitive function – which includes memory, attention, processing speed and reasoning. Crucially, the scientists have discovered that these two networks – which each …

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RB 2015: Jay Jerome

The first speaker on the Age-Related diseases Track at RB2015 is Jay Jerome, Associate Professor of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. In his talk titled Lysosomes, Lipids and Longevity he focused on cholesterol with respect to lysosome function, specifically in macrophages. Why cholesterol? It’s related to diseases of aging and specific …

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