Brillouin funded for $2 million and Acoustic Cavitation Fusion

1. PESN reports that low energy nuclear reaction company Brillouin was funded for $2 million. Brillouin is starting an SRI contract middle of June.

2. Impulse Devices’ Extreme Acoustic Cavitation™ from Impulse shows the potential to produce plasma at the super-concentrated cores of the collapsed bubbles, making this technology well-suited for producing acoustic inertial confinement fusion (Acoustic ICF). Acoustic ICF is a variety of “hot” fusion that, if successful, will require far less energy, cost, and resource use than other approaches—such as laser inertial confinement fusion—and solve a major challenge common to these other approaches: heat absorption. Using Acoustic ICF, heat is readily absorbed and transferred due to the fusion reaction occurring within a contained liquid medium.

Impulse’s current experimental data and computations support continued investigation into the possibility of achieving plasma temperatures capable of producing significant fusion yields. Based on current projections and experimental data, Impulse technology may ultimately be capable of creating usable energy at cost levels far lower than all known competing technologies currently available.

Under the $35-million Advanced Cavitation Power Technology (ACPT) contract, Impulse researched transformational new energy sources with military and civilian benefits.

The United States Department of Defense (DOD) required a potential power source that would require less energy, cost and resource use than other sources as well as reduce its reliance on fossil fuels. In 2007, the DOD initiated the Advanced Cavitation Power Technology (ACPT) program, a multi-year effort to investigate the use of Acoustic ICF as a potential power source and selected Impulse as the prime contractor. Acoustic ICF is the subject of an area of energy research and is most similar to laser inertial confinement fusion.

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Brillouin funded for $2 million and Acoustic Cavitation Fusion

1. PESN reports that low energy nuclear reaction company Brillouin was funded for $2 million. Brillouin is starting an SRI contract middle of June.

2. Impulse Devices’ Extreme Acoustic Cavitation™ from Impulse shows the potential to produce plasma at the super-concentrated cores of the collapsed bubbles, making this technology well-suited for producing acoustic inertial confinement fusion (Acoustic ICF). Acoustic ICF is a variety of “hot” fusion that, if successful, will require far less energy, cost, and resource use than other approaches—such as laser inertial confinement fusion—and solve a major challenge common to these other approaches: heat absorption. Using Acoustic ICF, heat is readily absorbed and transferred due to the fusion reaction occurring within a contained liquid medium.

Impulse’s current experimental data and computations support continued investigation into the possibility of achieving plasma temperatures capable of producing significant fusion yields. Based on current projections and experimental data, Impulse technology may ultimately be capable of creating usable energy at cost levels far lower than all known competing technologies currently available.

Under the $35-million Advanced Cavitation Power Technology (ACPT) contract, Impulse researched transformational new energy sources with military and civilian benefits.

The United States Department of Defense (DOD) required a potential power source that would require less energy, cost and resource use than other sources as well as reduce its reliance on fossil fuels. In 2007, the DOD initiated the Advanced Cavitation Power Technology (ACPT) program, a multi-year effort to investigate the use of Acoustic ICF as a potential power source and selected Impulse as the prime contractor. Acoustic ICF is the subject of an area of energy research and is most similar to laser inertial confinement fusion.

If you liked this article, please give it a quick review on ycombinator or StumbleUpon. Thanks

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